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  • About
  • The Global ETD Search service is a free service for researchers to find electronic theses and dissertations. This service is provided by the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations.
    Our metadata is collected from universities around the world. If you manage a university/consortium/country archive and want to be added, details can be found on the NDLTD website.
41

When corporations leave home : global corporate social responsibility and varieties of capitalism

Thissen-Smits, Marianne January 2013 (has links)
Today, multinational corporations demonstrate commitment to Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) by adopting global voluntary initiatives and codes of conduct and by publishing annual reports on their social behaviour. This research examines how the cross-­‐ country variation of CSR behaviour of firms can be explained by the ‘Varieties of Capitalism' theory, and explores whether the CSR behaviour of firms changes when operating across borders. A large-­‐N sample of the Fortune global 500 firms and a small-­‐N sample of five multinational oil companies operating in Nigeria were taken to test the research hypotheses, using quantitative and qualitative research methods. Some support was found for the Varieties of Capitalism theory. In particular, firms from the United States, a liberal market economy, are less likely to adopt global voluntary initiatives compared with firms from coordinated market economies or Mediterranean-­‐type economies. State-­‐owned firms, which are mainly headquartered in non-­‐OECD countries, are also less likely to adopt global initiatives, but the ones that do have high levels of adherence. External actors, such as international organisations, civil society organisations and philanthropic organisations are important in influencing a firm's commitment to CSR. Content analysis reveals that, in general, all corporations report on the same topics, with emphasis placed on what is perceived to be important to the stakeholders. This research found that the adoption of global initiatives and the reporting on social behaviour are headquarters-­‐orientated activities, and that there is often a disconnection in corporate social behaviour between the headquarters and the subsidiary. Because the CSR behaviour of firms clearly changes when operating across borders, the participation in voluntary initiatives should be done at a local and at headquarter level. Furthermore, the lack of participation in global initiatives by US firms and subsidiaries raises questions about the effectiveness and purpose of these initiatives.
42

Exploring corporate social responsibilty initiatives in Western Cape: the case of Sanlam Foundation

Rao, Shubhra January 2016 (has links)
A research report presented to The Department of Social Work School of Human and Community Development Faculty of Humanities University of the Witwatersrand In partial fulfilment of the requirement for the degree Master of Arts in Social Development March, 2016 / Corporate social responsibility (CSR) is now moving beyond being peripheral to business to becoming an integral part of it. Although there is a sizeable amount of literature on CSR, there is still no standard and agreed definition of CSR. The way CSR must be implemented and evaluated also remains a topic of debate. This gap is problematic as increasingly governments are involving corporations to address the inequalities that exist in society. At the same time several studies suggest that organizations struggle to have robust and effective CSR practices within their organizations. In South Africa, several legislations have been put in place to indirectly involve the private sector to address the inequalities arising out of the Apartheid and the BBBEE Act of 2003 has been instrumental in shaping the developmental path of post-apartheid South Africa, thus making implementation and reporting of CSI initiatives more important than ever before. The study sought to explore the nature of corporate social responsibility (CSR) practices of the Sanlam Foundation in the Western Cape, South Africa. The study adopted a qualitative case study design and the study population consisted of officials drawn from Sanlam Foundation and its implementing organizations. Participants were drawn from Sanlam Foundation’s implementing partners and key informants who are senior officials of the Sanlam Foundation also participated in the study. A sample of eight participants and two key informants and were drawn using purposive sampling. Semi structured interview schedules were used to collect data using face to face interviews with both participants and key informants. The findings revealed that monitoring, evaluation and reporting of CSR initiatives remain the biggest challenge in implementing of CSR initiatives. The findings also establish that there remains a gap in the NGOs’ and funder’s understanding of the reporting content. Measuring and expressing qualitative impact is a challenge for NGOs. The report recommends that both funders and partners must understand the implications of monitoring and evaluation of programmes. It also emphasizes the need to have simplified discussions with partners at inception to understand their views and develop project specific reporting templates that justify project specific impact. It is anticipated that the research findings will enable Sanlam Foundation and other companies to strengthen their CSR activities.
43

Blood money a grounded theory of corporate citizenship : Myanmar (Burma) as a case in point /

Black, Nicola M. January 2009 (has links)
Thesis (Ph.D. Strategic Management)--University of Waikato, 2010. / Title from PDF cover (viewed Apr. 22, 2010). Includes bibliographical references (p. 460-497)
44

Exchange as a determinant in corporate citizenship : Exploratory action research into the social construction of corporate citizenship.

Glazebrook, Mark, mikewood@deakin.edu.au January 2004 (has links)
This study attempts to achieve two things. Firstly it contextualizes corporate citizenship drawing on scholarly, government, media, legal and business discourses which when viewed as a whole, reveals the importance of exchange as a central determinant in how all the major themes or subfields of corporate citizenship function and subsequently become valued within public discourse. Secondly, it reports on exploratory action research where I as a researcher occupied a central role in understanding and contributing towards how organizational settings socially construct and evolve corporate citizenship in real time through various exchange behaviour, drawing from four years field research within BP and its interactions with the external world. This research contributes to new knowledge by building a rare contextual understanding into how cultural change evolves over time within an organization, from its public face, through policy, down into employee and stakeholder reactions, including identifying the crucial role played by Cultural bridges’ in shifting entrenched organizational culture towards embracing new, more sustainable ways of doing business, and additionally how practitioners can legitimately act as a researcher in facilitating this process by assisting an organization to move from simple, transactional relationships to more sustainable integrated social, financial and environmental exchange between business and its broader context. Importantly, this research develops entirely new theoretical models for understanding the social application and commercial value of corporate citizenship to both business and society.
45

Corporate social responsibility and consumer purchase intention

Dodd, Melissa D. January 2009 (has links)
Problem: Because an organizations’ profits are generally derived from product sales, it is important to recognize the relationship between consumers’ purchase intentions and organizational involvement in socially responsible practices. A gap exists in the research and studies conducted on consumer social responsibility as it relates to purchase intentions from a consumer perspective. H1: A positive association exists between an organization’s involvement in CSR programs and consumers’ purchase intentions. Thus, consumers are more likely to purchase an organization’s product if that organization is involved in socially responsible practices. RQ1: Are consumers aware of specific organizational involvement in socially responsible programs? RQ2: Are consumers aware of a lack of specific organizational involvement in socially responsible programs? Significance of Problem: Despite evidence that consumers appear to feel strongly about organizational involvement in socially responsible programs, research has shown that social responsibility was not a dominant goal in a majority of companies studied. Value: The relationship between CSR and consumers’ purchase intentions is important to understand because often CSR is dismissed as merely another public relations’ tool. However, understanding the underlying reasons consumers make purchases in relation to CSR would contribute to the understanding of CSR as a strategic management function overall. Methodology: Using a combination of interviews and emailed surveys, consumers were asked questions to determine the association between organizational involvement in socially responsible programs and consumers’ purchase intentions. Additionally, consumers were asked to identify their awareness of specific organizational involvement in socially responsible programs / Department of Journalism
46

The Link Management Limited : a socially responsible corporate?

Choy, Yuk-wa, 蔡玉澕 January 2014 (has links)
The Link REITs is the most renowned, world-wide real estate investment trust in Hong Kong since 25 November 2005. Yet, the performance of The Link REIT is controversial under the management of The Link Management Limited (“The Link”). The excellence financial performance of The Link is well known, but the non-financial performance is uncertain. While The Link has adopted a sustainability framework for sustainability management, the three key concepts including i) CSR, ii) sustainability and iii) the building of reputational capital will be integrated into one as a prism for analysis. “Corporate Social Responsibility (“CSR”) is simply part of the scope under the concept of sustainability and the notion of building reputational capital is ingrained in various theories in relations to CSR and sustainability. Business that operates to comply with economic and legal responsibilities can be asserted to survive. Together with its compliance with the ethical and philanthropic responsibilities, a company could enjoy increasing competitiveness by gaining consumer confidence over a long term. The Link has been experiencing changes in its moral system prior to its personnel change upon these years. Start from the individual level, CEO of The Link disseminated his espoused ethical values to the organizational and then to the societal level. The moral system will be examined; barriers against the dissemination of ethical practice will be addressed. Upon The Link’s behavioural change in its ethical practice, a reputation audit which is also known as perception test will be used to test if there are perception gaps exists in between levels of the dissemination. Contrasting the existing state of The Link’s ethical performance with the desired state wanted by The Link’s key constituencies, this would help to address the perception gaps. Whether these perception gaps are opportunities to improve or challenges to overcome, it is important information for The Link to further develop and to gauge its sustainability management strategy. / published_or_final_version / Housing Management / Master / Master of Housing Management
47

Perceptions of senior managers on corporate social responsibility in the petrochemical industry in Malaysia

Yam, Lee Hong January 2007 (has links)
The collapse of WorldCom (USA 2002), Enron (USA 2001), Exxon Valdez (USA 1989) and Union Carbide (India 1984) has inevitably invited tighter scrutiny from the public on unethical business practices. In order to be competitive in today's market economy, businesses need to be socially responsible and sensitive to the interests of various stakeholders, including the environment and society in general. / A study of senior managers' perceptions of CSR is vital as they are the most influential people in an organization, possessing the requisite power and resources to achieve its expectations. The petrochemical industry is chosen in this study due to its highly environmentally sensitive nature. In this research project, the CSR perceptions of senior managers in the petrochemical industry in Malaysia are examined from the perspectives of their demographic attributes, specific organizational characteristics and organizational culture. The main objectives are to study the CSR perceptions of senior of senior managers in the Malaysian petrochemical industry, to analyse the complex relationships among the moderating variables and CSR perceptions, as well as study the relationships among the four types of responsibilities of Carroll's (1979) CSR construct. Multivariate analysis, namely MANOVER, is used to analyse the complex relationships among senior managers' CSR perceptions, their demographic attributes, organizational characteristics and organizational culture. / The research findings indicate that there are simultaneous relationships among the variables correlated with the CSR perceptions of senior managers. These findings can provide useful guidelines in formulating organisational CSR policies, and human resource recruitment policy, as well as in designing training programs to increase CSR awareness among the employees. The CSR perceptions of the senior managers surveyed support Carroll's (1979) CSR model that the economic and legal responsibilities are viewed as more important than ethical and discretionary responsibilities. The relationships among the four types of responsibilities are also found to be consistent with the literature. Content analysis is used to supplement the quantitative analysis to give an overview of CSR in the Malaysian petrochemical industry by understanding the organisational culture pertaining to CSR. It is important to note that all participating companies are committed to being socially responsible in protecting the environment, despite the different levels of emphasis given in their organisational documents. / Thesis (DBA(DoctorateofBusinessAdministration))--University of South Australia, 2007
48

Perceptions of senior managers on corporate social responsibility in the petrochemical industry in Malaysia

Yam, Lee Hong January 2007 (has links)
The collapse of WorldCom (USA 2002), Enron (USA 2001), Exxon Valdez (USA 1989) and Union Carbide (India 1984) has inevitably invited tighter scrutiny from the public on unethical business practices. In order to be competitive in today's market economy, businesses need to be socially responsible and sensitive to the interests of various stakeholders, including the environment and society in general. / A study of senior managers' perceptions of CSR is vital as they are the most influential people in an organization, possessing the requisite power and resources to achieve its expectations. The petrochemical industry is chosen in this study due to its highly environmentally sensitive nature. In this research project, the CSR perceptions of senior managers in the petrochemical industry in Malaysia are examined from the perspectives of their demographic attributes, specific organizational characteristics and organizational culture. The main objectives are to study the CSR perceptions of senior of senior managers in the Malaysian petrochemical industry, to analyse the complex relationships among the moderating variables and CSR perceptions, as well as study the relationships among the four types of responsibilities of Carroll's (1979) CSR construct. Multivariate analysis, namely MANOVER, is used to analyse the complex relationships among senior managers' CSR perceptions, their demographic attributes, organizational characteristics and organizational culture. / The research findings indicate that there are simultaneous relationships among the variables correlated with the CSR perceptions of senior managers. These findings can provide useful guidelines in formulating organisational CSR policies, and human resource recruitment policy, as well as in designing training programs to increase CSR awareness among the employees. The CSR perceptions of the senior managers surveyed support Carroll's (1979) CSR model that the economic and legal responsibilities are viewed as more important than ethical and discretionary responsibilities. The relationships among the four types of responsibilities are also found to be consistent with the literature. Content analysis is used to supplement the quantitative analysis to give an overview of CSR in the Malaysian petrochemical industry by understanding the organisational culture pertaining to CSR. It is important to note that all participating companies are committed to being socially responsible in protecting the environment, despite the different levels of emphasis given in their organisational documents. / Thesis (DBA(DoctorateofBusinessAdministration))--University of South Australia, 2007
49

Corporate social responsibility and its implementation : a study of companies in the global forest sector /

Han, Xiaoou. January 1900 (has links)
Thesis (M.S.)--Oregon State University, 2010. / Printout. Includes bibliographical references (leaves 89-96). Also available on the World Wide Web.
50

Touching the heart : an exploration of business involvement with young people in recovery from substance abuse /

Harley, Margaret Pauline. January 2005 (has links) (PDF)
Thesis (D.Soc.Sc.) - University of Queensland, / Includes bibliography.

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