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  • About
  • The Global ETD Search service is a free service for researchers to find electronic theses and dissertations. This service is provided by the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations.
    Our metadata is collected from universities around the world. If you manage a university/consortium/country archive and want to be added, details can be found on the NDLTD website.
1

Geology of the Killala Lake igneous complex, district of Thunder Bay, Ontario, Canada.

Coates, Maurice Eugene. January 1967 (has links)
No description available.
2

Geology of the Killala Lake igneous complex, district of Thunder Bay, Ontario, Canada.

Coates, Maurice Eugene. January 1967 (has links)
No description available.
3

Reacquaint the waters of history: the Kaministiquia River

Mitchell, Sarah C.R. 13 January 2014 (has links)
The modern interaction we have with the natural environment surrounding our cities is often limited to designated areas that usually contain manicured trails. When information is very limited or absent we often avoid exploring such areas and instead opt for others both familiar and easily accessible. Mapping as a means to engage a community is a method that encourages exploration and discovery. Often there are hidden treasures of our communities’ backyards that have nearly been lost to time and memory. This practicum is an attempt to reconnect and engage residents and visitors of Thunder Bay, Ontario, with the historically significant Kaministiquia River. It focuses on the Kaministiquia from Kakabeka Falls to Lake Superior. By providing the public with information on the river’s attractions and how to access the river, it is hoped that families and individuals will utilitize the information to get outside and explore their surrounding environment.
4

"It's a workin' man's town" : class and culture in Northwestern Ontario

Dunk, Thomas W. (Thomas William) January 1988 (has links)
No description available.
5

"It's a workin' man's town" : class and culture in Northwestern Ontario / It is a working man's town.

Dunk, Thomas W. (Thomas William) January 1988 (has links)
No description available.
6

unplanned wanderings: and the discovery of a pier

Williamson, Micheal 15 September 2008 (has links)
My question here revolves around my orientation with my own work; my own frustrations and inability to so often answer the question “can a meaningful place be designed?” This journey examines the theory of semiotics. Through this, three strategies have been developed to explore the branches of semiotic research in Landscape Architecture. The first strategy allows meaning to develop through time, and it is with the repeated usage of people that meaning will accrue. The second strategy shows how meaning can be determined before the design through mapping current and desired locations of meaning in space. And, the third strategy reflects on how meaning emerges from the earth when no interference from designers or users occurs. The result of the three individual strategies is a combination of solutions, illustrating how to create places of true richness. This new space will engage visitors, pull in new visitors, and help create something memorable for those engaging in a space. / October 2008
7

unplanned wanderings: and the discovery of a pier

Williamson, Micheal 15 September 2008 (has links)
My question here revolves around my orientation with my own work; my own frustrations and inability to so often answer the question “can a meaningful place be designed?” This journey examines the theory of semiotics. Through this, three strategies have been developed to explore the branches of semiotic research in Landscape Architecture. The first strategy allows meaning to develop through time, and it is with the repeated usage of people that meaning will accrue. The second strategy shows how meaning can be determined before the design through mapping current and desired locations of meaning in space. And, the third strategy reflects on how meaning emerges from the earth when no interference from designers or users occurs. The result of the three individual strategies is a combination of solutions, illustrating how to create places of true richness. This new space will engage visitors, pull in new visitors, and help create something memorable for those engaging in a space.
8

unplanned wanderings: and the discovery of a pier

Williamson, Micheal 15 September 2008 (has links)
My question here revolves around my orientation with my own work; my own frustrations and inability to so often answer the question “can a meaningful place be designed?” This journey examines the theory of semiotics. Through this, three strategies have been developed to explore the branches of semiotic research in Landscape Architecture. The first strategy allows meaning to develop through time, and it is with the repeated usage of people that meaning will accrue. The second strategy shows how meaning can be determined before the design through mapping current and desired locations of meaning in space. And, the third strategy reflects on how meaning emerges from the earth when no interference from designers or users occurs. The result of the three individual strategies is a combination of solutions, illustrating how to create places of true richness. This new space will engage visitors, pull in new visitors, and help create something memorable for those engaging in a space.
9

Deglacial chronology and glacial stratigraphy of the western Thunder Bay lowland, northwest Ontario, Canada

Loope, Henry Munro January 2006 (has links)
No description available.
10

Fallen feathers in Thunder Bay: How Canada's newspapers implicate Indigenous youth

Gabriele, Chelsea Brianne 06 1900 (has links)
This study asks how the media perpetuates the cycle of racism, colonialism and stereotyping of Indigenous youth in Thunder Bay, and how Indigenous news sources participate in giving voice to Indigenous peoples. The research methodology is a discourse analysis examining both mainstream and Indigenous newspaper articles on the subject of the First Nations youth deaths in Thunder Bay. The methodology is also influenced by critical and decolonizing theories. Findings show that Indigenous newspaper articles are overall more inclusive of Indigenous voice, therefore providing an Indigenous perspective on the issue of First Nations youth dying in Thunder Bay and leaving out racist portrayals. On the other hand, non-Indigenous newspaper articles include less Indigenous voice and use the opinion of individuals in powerful positions. They also tend to portray Indigenous people in a negative light when compared to Indigenous newspapers. Outcomes from this research include implications for social workers such as: developing an understanding of how the media perpetuates racism, colonialism and stereotyping against Indigenous youth, advocating for and empowering Indigenous youth so they can come together and fight for change in First Nations education, and improving education within schools of social work regarding advocacy in the media. / Thesis / Master of Social Work (MSW)

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