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  • About
  • The Global ETD Search service is a free service for researchers to find electronic theses and dissertations. This service is provided by the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations.
    Our metadata is collected from universities around the world. If you manage a university/consortium/country archive and want to be added, details can be found on the NDLTD website.
1

A Study of Commercialization on different kinds of Non-Profit Organizations.

Huang, Yu-Fen 18 July 2006 (has links)
With great change of the environment, nonprofit organizations can¡¦t get enough subsidies by the national government's budget. On the other hand, the depression of the environment makes people's income reduce, and also increases the degree of difficulty that nonprofit organization raises money. It is obvious that commercialization is more popular on nonprofit organization abroad, and in Taiwan, some organizations have already operated their commercialized behaviors too. This research¡¦s topic is how should NPO do so that the commercialized behaviors will make the source of the funds sufficient and not violate the goal of organizations? After study, we can find the following conclusions: The motives that nonprofit organizations have the commercialized behaviors are increasing the source of the funds and enforcing government¡¦s policies. Most commercialized activities are correlating with organizations¡¦ missions. Commercialized operation needs full-time department or the professional person to plan. The leader's philosophy and staff's ability have huge influence on the commercialized behaviors. By the way, the formulation of the government policy often brings great impact of nonprofit organizations. Finally, this research offers four suggestions: Set up a specific department or qualify professional persons; catch on government¡¦s policies actively; learn from successful organizations; commercialization and mission are both important.
2

The entrepreneur's technology commercialization framework

Haldeman, Andrew Paul 03 October 2011 (has links)
The goal of this thesis is to develop a framework for technology commercialization specifically geared towards the capabilities of an entrepreneur. The entrepreneur in this case is typified by limited capital assets and minimal visibility to mainstream consumers. This affects many aspects of business including manufacturing, marketing, advertising and customer recognition. This thesis defines the entrepreneur’s technology commercialization framework in discrete steps based on existing and widely accepted technology commercialization models. The developed framework is specialized for the entrepreneur by proposing methods that leverage existing infrastructures to maximize the effectiveness of the entrepreneur. Two existing technology commercialization models were used as a foundation for the proposed framework. By combining the product-centric model developed by Vijay Jolly with the market-centric model developed by Everett Rogers and further refined by Geoffrey Moore, a foundation for the entrepreneur’s technology commercialization framework exists. The entrepreneur’s technology commercialization framework consists of four phases and four links that can be associated with the combined commercialization model described earlier. Further research examining processes and rules that so-called successful entrepreneurs follow was also required. Key activities successful entrepreneurs perform were identified. These activities were integrated into the entrepreneur’s technology commercialization framework. Following development of the entrepreneur’s technology commercialization framework, the application of the framework is described. The application focuses on the introduction of new products in the golf equipment industry, specifically golf club iron sets. The application of the framework is prefaced by two case studies specific to the golf equipment industry that reinforce the utility of the proposed entrepreneur’s technology commercialization framework. The application describes in detail the plan for developing and introducing an innovative golf club iron set. / text
3

Investigation of Research Commercialization at a University: A Case Study

Zhou, Yu 06 May 2015 (has links)
With the increase of awareness and focus on university research commercialization, much research had been conducted to investigate this subject. It was revealed that because universities were not traditionally built to serve the purpose of commercialization, many obstacles existed in the path of university research commercialization. Historically, research had largely focused on identifying critical factors that impacted the performance of commercialization. However, it was not clear how those findings could be systematically incorporated into the commercialization improvement plan of individual cases. This research intended to fill this gap and provide a framework that could be used by most universities to access and improve their research commercialization process. A case study of a U.S. land-grant university was conducted and a narrative approach was mainly used as the method of data analysis. Under the scope of a single-case study, four sub-studies were conducted to address the goals of this research. First, a framework was developed that incorporated theories of existing research and the value stream map of lean management. Interviews with the intellectual property office and faculty were conducted to determine if the theoretical framework was applicable. It was found that the framework fitted well with the current process of university research commercialization. After that, a survey that covered a sample size of 1110 researchers at the targeted university was conducted to investigate the importance of different resources at different stages of the process. Resources that were under investigation were grouped into four categories: technical, human, social, and financial resources. This research identified the most important resources for research commercialization were industrial connections (social resource) and assistance from the intellectual property (IP) office (human resource), with industrial connections playing a more importance role at the beginning of the process and the IP office from the stage of patent application. To assess organizational characteristics of the targeted university, interviews were conducted with 22 faculty, three representatives from the administration, one representative from the intellectual property office, and one representative from an external organization. Six criteria derived from previous research were used to guide the assessment: (1) expenditures on research and development (RandD), (2) intellectual property policy, (3) research field, (4) key individuals, (5) commitment to innovation, and (6) networking with external relations. It was found that the targeted university had strong evidence of the advantages of expenditures on RandD and research field, however, it was relatively weak in the other four characteristics. The last part of the research involved interviews with two companies for the purpose of developing a best practice for research commercialization with the examples from the industry. Recommendations to improve targeted university's research commercialization were developed based on findings of the research. / Ph. D.
4

Commercialization for Innovative Products in the Residential Construction Industry

McCoy, Andrew P. 09 September 2008 (has links)
This work presents the development of a new framework for the commercialization of innovative products in the residential construction industry. It is the aim of this work to identify commercialization decisions, actions, risks, barriers and accelerators specific to the residential construction industry market that will increase the acceptance of product innovations for those developing them. Commercialization is broadly defined as the process of developing a business enterprise from an idea, through feasibility and implementation, to its acceptance into a market (USDOE 1999, Goldsmith 2003). Commercialization frameworks describe the concurrent decisions and actions along the innovation development process, optimizing all of the technical and business decisions required for a successful introduction to the marketplace. Successful commercialization frameworks serve as a form of development plan, promoting solutions to questions and problems that arise along the development path. This research derives such a framework for the commercialization of innovative products and makes it specific to residential construction through the following tasks: 1. Understanding standard terminology: defining innovation and commercialization as they relate to this work. 2. Creating a lens for the unique nature of commercialization in this industry: deriving a commercialization framework (matrix) from the research literature in business, construction, and concurrent engineering, capable of accepting later alterations. 3. Understanding the manufacturer's role and risks: conducting case study interviews for fifteen innovative residential construction products that specify important tasks, risks and benefits for commercialization. 4. Understanding the role, risks and benefits of builders, as users of innovation: comparing case studies and workshop surveys of many residential construction industry players that focus on the builder to establish parameters for the innovation commercialization matrix. 5. Linking both manufacturer and builder: comparing manufacturer commercialization best-practices with builder adoption patterns for innovative products over time. / Ph. D.
5

Factors affecting commercialization of newly developed products : a study of selected small and medium enterprises in South Africa

Manaczynski, Michael 20 August 2012 (has links)
The research was conducted to determine what the success factors for new product development and commercialization were for a selected sample of SMEs in South Africa. Academic literature on success factors for New Product Development and commercialization, as well as small and medium businesseswere reviewed. The review of the literature provided the theoretical framework for 21 success factors relevant to the study. These success factors were further extrapolated to 36 success factors and used as a basis for determining South African SME relevance. The findings were consistent with the literature review and point to several success factors that South African SMEs deem critical to success of new product development. In conclusion, South African SMEs confirm the importance of the success factors as presented in the literature. The ranking by importance of these success factors highlight the specific value that South African SMEs place on these success factors. These need further in-depth research.
6

How do Intellectual Property Rights help commercializing inventions in Europe? The case of the introduction of the European community patent system

Nordkvist, Anna Maria Kalo and Leif January 2010 (has links)
This thesis will show how patents policies can help the commercialization of inventions in Europe. Our study is mainly based on statistical material contained in the European Patent Office’s (EPO) database of published granted patents. Our study covers 407 granted patents in the field of chemistry and handling & processing in a one period year starting on 2007-12-24 and ending on 2008-12-26.Given the scope of data analysis, we found a tendency to limit the patents post (after) grant to a few states in Europe, mainly to Germany (DE), France (FR), Great Britain (GB), Italy (IT), Spain (ES), The Netherlands (NL) and Sweden (SE). This limitation in time and designated states is an indication that the markets in these states are the most important ones in Europe concerning the fields of chemistry and handling & processing for the applicant of the patent (e.g. the proprietor). In more than 70% of the number of granted patents post grant in our empirical study DE, FR and GB are the designated states. But we also found that in several of the granted patents in our thesis, Austria (AT), Belgium (BE), Switzerland (CH) and Finland (FI) are designated post grant. The numbers of designated states, post grant, in the scope of our thesis are higher compared with earlier studies applying the same method. For example Markus Reitzig’s empirical study that was made in 2004 uses 813 granted European patents, where the designation of DE, FR and GB was more significant and only 4-5 states on average were designated. It is an indication that the European market has extended the last 10 years within the fields of our study. The uniqueness of our empirical study comes from the survey of each of the 407 granted patents when it was filed at the European Patent Office (EPO) and after grant and publishing (post grant), i.e. at the beginning of the life cycle of the patent. As far as we know no earlier studies did so. Concerning our sample of applications for a European patent, the rational is the following. When the application is filed at EPO are all possible states designated, but post grant of the patent only a few state remains. Concerning the selection of the field of patenting, our consideration of data singularises chemistry and handling & processing. Clearly in the field of chemistry we found a marked incremental tendency for the transfer of patents rights. The transfer itself may be an indicator of a change either of industrial process toward R&D or a strategy toward patent policies in this specific field. The thesis tries consequently to evaluate if the EU-patent system will ease the commercialization of inventions in chemistry and handling´& processing in Europe. Especially for SMEs the EU-patent should facilitate a quicker and cheaper process. A general opinion assumes that the European patent application is too expensive for small companies. The process of establishing EU-patent was initiated 30 years ago and it will last another 5 years before it is fully possible to filing. Obviously, legal and political matters are not completely solved but that is not the direct concern of this thesis.
7

Factors affecting commercialization of newly developed products : a study of selected small and medium enterprises in South Africa

Manaczynski, Michael 20 August 2012 (has links)
The research was conducted to determine what the success factors for new product development and commercialization were for a selected sample of SMEs in South Africa. Academic literature on success factors for New Product Development and commercialization, as well as small and medium businesseswere reviewed. The review of the literature provided the theoretical framework for 21 success factors relevant to the study. These success factors were further extrapolated to 36 success factors and used as a basis for determining South African SME relevance. The findings were consistent with the literature review and point to several success factors that South African SMEs deem critical to success of new product development. In conclusion, South African SMEs confirm the importance of the success factors as presented in the literature. The ranking by importance of these success factors highlight the specific value that South African SMEs place on these success factors. These need further in-depth research.
8

Mind Map and demonstration of the Quicklook methodology for technology commercialization

Harbert, Andrew Paul 03 December 2013 (has links)
Quicklooks provide an initial examination of commercialization potential of a technology. This thesis examines the Quicklook methodology in support of technology commercialization. The paper uses a Mind Map to create a visual representation of the methodology in a single image. Each component of the Mind Map is constructed individually and described in detail. The Mind Map allows the relationship between the many components of the Quicklook to be understood more rapidly. An example of a Quicklook report follows. The results of a Quicklook analysis support improved decisions regarding continued commercialization efforts while outlining the steps needed to get the product or service to market. The technology, its intellectual property, the market, and the competition are included in the analysis. Commercialization specific aspects, such as economic sustainability and business models, are then considered along with the value proposition. The final step in the Quicklook methodology is to recommend whether or not commercialization efforts should continue. / text
9

The Commercialization Of The Atlanta Pride Festival: “Somebody's Got To Pay For It”

Beasley, Sarah 17 December 2014 (has links)
This thesis is focused on the commercialization of the Atlanta Pride Festival during the years 1992-1997. Through personal interviews, I have concluded that the Atlanta Pride Festival produced complicated experiences for participants who had mixed feelings about the commercialization.
10

Social Impact Bonds and the Perils of Aligned Interests

Maier, Florentine, Meyer, Michael 15 July 2017 (has links) (PDF)
Social impact bonds (SIBs) have been welcomed enthusiastically as a new funding tool for social innovation, yet also condemned as an instrument that neglects beneficiaries' and taxpayers' interests, opening profit opportunities in the field of social politics for smart private investors. We will shed a more analytical light on SIBs, assuming that, like any contract, SIBs try to align interests between partners with partly converging, partly diverging goals. Thus, it remains mainly a matter of negation, and non-profit social service providers as well as public agencies should avoid particular perils and pitfalls.

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