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  • About
  • The Global ETD Search service is a free service for researchers to find electronic theses and dissertations. This service is provided by the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations.
    Our metadata is collected from universities around the world. If you manage a university/consortium/country archive and want to be added, details can be found on the NDLTD website.
1

Operational Aspects of Decision Feedback Equalizers

Kennedy, Rodney Andrew, rodney.kennedy@anu.edu.au January 1989 (has links)
The central theme is the study of error propagation effects in decision feedback equalizers (DFEs). The thesis contains: a stochastic analysis of error propagation in a tuned DFE; an analysis of the effects of error propagation in a blindly adapted DFE; a deterministic analysis of error propagation through input-output stability ideas; and testing procedures for establishing correct tap convergence in blind adaptation. To a lesser extent, the decision directed equalizer (DDE) is also treated.¶ Characterizing error propagation using finite state Markov process (FSMP) techniques is first considered. We classify how the channel and DFE parameters affect the FSMP model and establish tight bounds on the error probability and mean error recovery time of a tuned DFE. These bounds are shown to be too conservative for practical use and highlight the need for imposing stronger hypotheses on the class of channels for which a DFE may be effectively used.¶ In blind DFE adaptation we show the effect of decision errors is to distort the adaptation relative to the use of a training sequence. The mean square error surface in a LMS type setting is shown to be a concatenation of quadratic functions exposing the possibility of false tap convergence to undesirable DFE parameter settings. Averaging analysis and simulation are used to verify this behaviour on some examples.¶ Error propagation in a tuned DFE is also examined in a deterministic setting. A finite error recovery time problem is set up as an input-output stability problem. Passivity theory is invoked to prove that a DFE can be effectively used on a channel satisfying a simple frequency domain condition. These results give performance bounds which relate well with practice.¶ Testing for false tap convergence in blind adaptation concludes our study. Simple statistic output tests are shown to be capable of discerning correct operation of a DDE. Similar tests are conjectured for the DFE, supported by proofs for the low dimensional cases.
2

MULTIVARIATE SYSTEMS ANALYSIS

Wolting, Duane 10 1900 (has links)
International Telemetering Conference Proceedings / October 28-31, 1985 / Riviera Hotel, Las Vegas, Nevada / In many engineering applications, a systems analysis is performed to study the effects of random error propagation throughout a system. Often these errors are not independent, and have joint behavior characterized by arbitrary covariance structure. The multivariate nature of such problems is compounded in complex systems, where overall system performance is described by a q-dimensional random vector. To address this problem, a computer program was developed which generates Taylor series approximations for multivariate system performance in the presence of random component variablilty. A summary of an application of this approach is given in which an analysis was performed to assess simultaneous design margins and to ensure optimal component selection.
3

Financial and risk assessment and selection of health monitoring system design options for legacy aircraft

Esperon Miguez, Manuel 10 1900 (has links)
Aircraft operators demand an ever increasing availability of their fleets with constant reduction of their operational costs. With the age of many fleets measured in decades, the options to face these challenges are limited. Integrated Vehicle Health Management (IVHM) uses data gathered through sensors in the aircraft to assess the condition of components to detect and isolate faults or even estimate their Remaining Useful Life (RUL). This information can then be used to improve the planning of maintenance operations and even logistics and operational planning, resulting in shorter maintenance stops and lower cost. Retrofitting health monitoring technology onto legacy aircraft has the capability to deliver what operators and maintainers demand, but working on aging platforms presents numerous challenges. This thesis presents a novel methodology to select the combination of diagnostic and prognostic tools for legacy aircraft that best suits the stakeholders’ needs based on economic return and financial risk. The methodology is comprised of different steps in which a series of quantitative analyses are carried out to reach an objective solution. Beginning with the identification of which components could bring higher reduction of maintenance cost and time if monitored, the methodology also provides a method to define the requirements for diagnostic and prognostic tools capable of monitoring these components. It then continues to analyse how combining these tools affects the economic return and financial risk. Each possible combination is analysed to identify which of them should be retrofitted. Whilst computer models of maintenance operations can be used to analyse the effect of retrofitting IVHM technology on a legacy fleet, the number of possible combinations of diagnostic and prognostic tools is too big for this approach to be practicable. Nevertheless, computer models can go beyond the economic analysis performed thus far and simulations are used as part of the methodology to get an insight of other effects or retrofitting the chosen toolset.
4

A Framework for Software Security Testing and Evaluation

Dutta, Rahul Kumar January 2015 (has links)
Security in automotive industry is a thought of concern these days. As more smart electronic devices are getting connected to each other, the dependency on these devices are urging us to connect them with moving objects such as cars, buses, trucks etc. As such, safety and security issues related to automotive objects are becoming more relevant in the realm of internet connected devices and objects. In this thesis, we emphasize on certain factors that introduces security vulnerabilities in the implementation phase of Software Development Life Cycle (SDLC). Input invalidation is one of them that we address in our work. We implement a security evaluation framework that allows us to improve security in automotive software by identifying and removing software security vulnerabilities that arise due to input invalidation reasons during SDLC. We propose to use this framework in the implementation and testing phase so that the critical deficiencies of software in security by design issues could be easily addressed and mitigated.
5

Financial and risk assessment and selection of health monitoring system design options for legacy aircraft

Esperon Miguez, Manuel January 2013 (has links)
Aircraft operators demand an ever increasing availability of their fleets with constant reduction of their operational costs. With the age of many fleets measured in decades, the options to face these challenges are limited. Integrated Vehicle Health Management (IVHM) uses data gathered through sensors in the aircraft to assess the condition of components to detect and isolate faults or even estimate their Remaining Useful Life (RUL). This information can then be used to improve the planning of maintenance operations and even logistics and operational planning, resulting in shorter maintenance stops and lower cost. Retrofitting health monitoring technology onto legacy aircraft has the capability to deliver what operators and maintainers demand, but working on aging platforms presents numerous challenges. This thesis presents a novel methodology to select the combination of diagnostic and prognostic tools for legacy aircraft that best suits the stakeholders’ needs based on economic return and financial risk. The methodology is comprised of different steps in which a series of quantitative analyses are carried out to reach an objective solution. Beginning with the identification of which components could bring higher reduction of maintenance cost and time if monitored, the methodology also provides a method to define the requirements for diagnostic and prognostic tools capable of monitoring these components. It then continues to analyse how combining these tools affects the economic return and financial risk. Each possible combination is analysed to identify which of them should be retrofitted. Whilst computer models of maintenance operations can be used to analyse the effect of retrofitting IVHM technology on a legacy fleet, the number of possible combinations of diagnostic and prognostic tools is too big for this approach to be practicable. Nevertheless, computer models can go beyond the economic analysis performed thus far and simulations are used as part of the methodology to get an insight of other effects or retrofitting the chosen toolset.
6

Error Propagation Dynamics of PIV-based Pressure Field Calculation

Pan, Zhao 01 May 2016 (has links)
Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) based pressure field calculation is becoming increasingly popular in experimental fluid dynamics due to its non-intrusive nature. Errors propagated from PIV results to pressure field calculations are unavoidable, and in most cases, non-negligible. However, the specific dynamics of this error propagation process have not been unveiled. This dissertation examines both why and how errors in the experimental data are propagated to the pressure field by direct analysis of the pressure Poisson equation. Error in the pressure calculations are bounded with the error level of the experimental data. The error bounds quantitatively explain why and how many factors (i.e., geometry and length scale of the flow domain, type of boundary conditions) determine the resulting error propagation. The reason that the type of flow and profile of the error matter to the error propagation is also qualitatively illustrated. Numerical and experimental validations are conducted to verify these results. The results and framework introduced in this research can be used to guide the optimization of the experimental design, and potentially estimate the error in the reconstructed pressure field before performing PIV experiments.
7

EVALUATING THE IMPACTS OF INPUT AND PARAMETER UNCERTAINTY ON STREAMFLOW SIMULATIONS IN LARGE UNDER-INSTRUMENTED BASINS

Demaria, Eleonora Maria January 2010 (has links)
In data-poor regions around the world, particularly in less-privileged countries, hydrologists cannot always take advantage of available hydrological models to simulate a hydrological system due to the lack of reliable measurements of hydrological variables, in particular rainfall and streamflows, needed to implement and evaluate these models. Rainfall estimates obtained with remotely deployed sensors constitute an excellent source of precipitation for these basins, however they are prone to errors that can potentially affect hydrologic simulations. Concurrently, limited access to streamflow measurements does not allow a detailed representation of the system's structure through parameter estimation techniques. This dissertation presents multiple studies that evaluate the usefulness of remotely sensed products for different hydrological applications and the sensitivity of simulated streamflow to parameter uncertainty across basins with different hydroclimatic characteristics with the ultimate goal of increasing the applicability of land surface models in ungauged basins, particularly in South America. Paper 1 presents a sensitivity analysis of daily simulated streamflows to changes in model parameters along a hydroclimatic gradient. Parameters controlling the generation of surface and subsurface flow were targeted for the study. Results indicate that the sensitivity is strongly controlled by climate and that a more parsimonious version of the model could be implemented. Paper 2 explores how errors in satellite-estimated precipitation, due to infrequent satellite measurements, propagate through the simulation of a basin's hydrological cycle and impact the characteristics of peak streamflows within the basin. Findings indicate that nonlinearities in the hydrological cycle can introduce bias in simulated streamflows with error-corrupted precipitation. They also show that some characteristics of peak discharges are not conditioned by errors in satellite-estimated precipitation at a daily time step. Paper 3 evaluates the dominant sources of error in three satellite products when representing convective storms and how shifts in the location of the storm affect simulated peak streamflows in the basin. Results indicate that satellite products show some deficiencies retrieving convective processes and that a ground bias correction can mitigate these deficiencies but without sacrificing the potential for real-time hydrological applications. Finally, spatially shifted precipitation fields affect the magnitude of the peaks, however, its impact on the timing of the peaks is dampened out by the system's response at a daily time scale.
8

Error propagation analysis for remotely sensed aboveground biomass

Alboabidallah, Ahmed Hussein Hamdullah January 2018 (has links)
Above-Ground Biomass (AGB) assessment using remote sensing has been an active area of research since the 1970s. However, improvements in the reported accuracy of wide scale studies remain relatively small. Therefore, there is a need to improve error analysis to answer the question: Why is AGB assessment accuracy still under doubt? This project aimed to develop and implement a systematic quantitative methodology to analyse the uncertainty of remotely sensed AGB, including all perceptible error types and reducing the associated costs and computational effort required in comparison to conventional methods. An accuracy prediction tool was designed based on previous study inputs and their outcome accuracy. The methodology used included training a neural network tool to emulate human decision making for the optimal trade-off between cost and accuracy for forest biomass surveys. The training samples were based on outputs from a number of previous biomass surveys, including 64 optical data based studies, 62 Lidar data based studies, 100 Radar data based studies, and 50 combined data studies. The tool showed promising convergent results of medium production ability. However, it might take many years until enough studies will be published to provide sufficient samples for accurate predictions. To provide field data for the next steps, 38 plots within six sites were scanned with a Leica ScanStation P20 terrestrial laser scanner. The Terrestrial Laser Scanning (TLS) data analysis used existing techniques such as 3D voxels and applied allometric equations, alongside exploring new features such as non-plane voxel layers, parent-child relationships between layers and skeletonising tree branches to speed up the overall processing time. The results were two maps for each plot, a tree trunk map and branch map. An error analysis tool was designed to work on three stages. Stage 1 uses a Taylor method to propagate errors from remote sensing data for the products that were used as direct inputs to the biomass assessment process. Stage 2 applies a Monte Carlo method to propagate errors from the direct remote sensing and field inputs to the mathematical model. Stage 3 includes generating an error estimation model that is trained based on the error behaviour of the training samples. The tool was applied to four biomass assessment scenarios, and the results show that the relative error of AGB represented by the RMSE of the model fitting was high (20-35% of the AGB) in spite of the relatively high correlation coefficients. About 65% of the RMSE is due to the remote sensing and field data errors, with the remaining 35% due to the ill-defined relationship between the remote sensing data and AGB. The error component that has the largest influence was the remote sensing error (50-60% of the propagated error), with both the spatial and spectral error components having a clear influence on the total error. The influence of field data errors was close to the remote sensing data errors (40-50% of the propagated error) and its spatial and non-spatial Overall, the study successfully traced the errors and applied certainty-scenarios using the software tool designed for this purpose. The applied novel approach allowed for a relatively fast solution when mapping errors outside the fieldwork areas.
9

Quantifying the uncertainty caused by sampling, modeling, and field measurements in the estimation of AGB with information of the national forest inventory in Durango, Mexico

Trucíos Caciano, Ramón 20 April 2020 (has links)
No description available.
10

SEU-Induced Persistent Error Propagation in FPGAs

Morgan, Keith S. 06 July 2006 (has links)
This thesis introduces a new way to characterize the dynamic SEU cross section of an FPGA design in terms of its persistent and non-persistent components. An SEU in the persistent cross section results in a permanent interruption of service until reset. An SEU in the non-persistent cross section causes a temporary interruption of service, but in some cases this interruption may be tolerated. Techniques for measuring these cross sections are introduced. These cross sections can be measured and characterized for an arbitrary FPGA design. Furthermore, circuit components in the non-persistent and persistent cross section can statically be determined. Functional error mitigation techniques can leverage this identification to improve the reliability of some applications at lower costs by focusing mitigation on just the persistent cross section. The reliability of a practical signal processing application in use at Los Alamos National Laboratory was improved by nearly two orders of magnitude at a theoretical savings of over 53% over traditional comprehensive mitigation techniques such as full TMR.

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