• Refine Query
  • Source
  • Publication year
  • to
  • Language
  • 2359
  • 1124
  • 591
  • 458
  • 281
  • 194
  • 121
  • 93
  • 57
  • 32
  • 28
  • 23
  • 18
  • 16
  • 15
  • Tagged with
  • 6935
  • 983
  • 972
  • 968
  • 778
  • 707
  • 619
  • 493
  • 460
  • 408
  • 391
  • 385
  • 378
  • 377
  • 368
  • About
  • The Global ETD Search service is a free service for researchers to find electronic theses and dissertations. This service is provided by the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations.
    Our metadata is collected from universities around the world. If you manage a university/consortium/country archive and want to be added, details can be found on the NDLTD website.
111

The impact of a computer-based reading intervention program, "Academy of Reading" on reading achievement of second and third graders

Wilkinson, Tammy Bruce 03 May 2008 (has links)
This study’s purpose was to examine the impact of a computer-assisted reading program, “Academy of Reading,” on reading achievement of 2nd and 3rd grade readers. The researcher studied the impact a computer-aided reading program had on the reading achievement of students in a central Mississippi suburban school district. A quasi-experimental research design was used to conduct the research. There were a total of 8 intact classes out of 30 classes from 1 elementary school used in the study. Of these 8, 4 were 2nd-grade classes of 15 intact classes and 4 were 3rd-grade classes of 15 intact classes. The 2nd grade reading classes that were selected were identified as below average according to the Scientific Research Association (SRA) Reading Placement Test. The 3rd grade classes selected were performing at grade level. The 3rd grade did not have many intact classes below the established grade 3 level as in 2nd grade. The selected classes were randomly put in the control and quasi-experimental groups. Both groups were given the STAR reading assessment as a pretest. The quasi-experimental group contained 65 students who received the treatment for a 9-week period. Each class went to the computer lab 3 times a week for 30-minute sessions. The control group contained 68 students who continued with independent reading activities in the classroom. At the end of the quasi-experimental treatment both groups were administered the STAR reading assessment as the post-test. The control group had a pretest mean score of 3.14 and the quasi-experimental group had 2.64. An analysis of covariance was used to adjust for the pretest differences. The post-test scores indicated a slight increase in the mean scores in reading performance of both groups. The mean score for the control group was 3.30 and the quasi-experimental group was 2.87. The control group students improved the mean score by 0.16 and the quasi-experimental group improved by 0.23 points. There was no significant difference; therefore the null hypothesis was accepted. The quasi-experimental group had increased in reading performance as suggested by many articles and research publications, such as Fiedorowicz and Trites (1987), Colorado Commission of the States (1999), and Schacter (2000) supporting Academy of Reading. When the data were analyzed based on gender, ethnicity, and grade level, the quasi-experimental group had the largest increase in the mean scores. However, the findings showed that there was no statistical difference among the groups based on these demographic variables.
112

Strategic Intervention: Parasitic Architecture

McDaniel, Charles N. 21 August 2008 (has links)
No description available.
113

Nutrient Intake Improves in Overweight Postpartum Women when Exposed to a Dietary Intervention

Lynch, Grace M. 26 September 2011 (has links)
No description available.
114

Effectiveness of smoking cessation intervention supported by medicaid in Ohio

Haynes, Elaine F. 07 November 2003 (has links)
No description available.
115

Ending Intimate Partner Violence: Preventative versus Restorative Interventions - Are We Waiting Too Long?

Sepper, Rebecca 16 November 2017 (has links)
This qualitative study aimed to explore the connection between experiences of childhood family violence and the perpetration of intimate partner violence. Rooted in an interpretivist methodology, the perceptions and experiences of six male participants were explored via individual interviews. The participants identified having experienced/witnessed family violence. They too stated perpetuating intimate partner violence. The participants were asked questions exploring how they perceived their childhood experiences and/or exposure to family violence to have and continue to impact them into adulthood. Based on the stories of these participants, four major themes were identified; however, ultimately, the importance of adequate and appropriate responses to the external manifestations of the impacts of family violence was emphasized. The discussion urges that current restorative responses to intimate partner violence be evaluated for ones that are preventative in nature, as well as suggested based on the specific needs of each individual. / Thesis / Master of Social Work (MSW)
116

An Evaluation of the Effectiveness of the Caregiving Essentials Course for Informal Caregivers of Older Adults in Ontario and its Online Delivery

Rottenberg, Shelley January 2020 (has links)
Informal caregiving is a growing phenomenon, but many family members and friends fall into the role unequipped with the necessary knowledge and skills. Informal caregivers often experience high levels of burden and are vulnerable to developing negative health outcomes. Effective and easily accessible interventions are needed for this group. This research evaluates the effectiveness of the Caregiving Essentials pilot course offerings and their online delivery. The objectives of the course are to increase the following in terms of the caregiver experience: 1) Knowledge, ability, skills, confidence, and self-efficacy in caregiving, 2) Self-reported sense of personal health and well-being, 3) Perceptions of health and well-being of older adults in their care, and 4) Understanding and access of the health and social service system. The evaluation study determines whether these four objectives were met, and to what extent. Additionally, the research explores the ways in which the online delivery of the course contributes to its overall effectiveness, and specifically, whether aspects of the web-based modality enhance or hinder participants’ learning experience. The methodology includes pre/post-course surveys (n=111/n=39), participant interviews (n=26), stakeholder interviews (n=6), and a focus group (n=5). Caregiving Essentials met many of the proposed research objectives. Increasing knowledge, understanding, and confidence was a stronger outcome than increasing the health and well-being of the caregivers and their care recipients. Overall, most of the participants reported positive experiences with the course, including a perceived positive future impact. Furthermore, the online delivery of the course enabled greater accessibility for participants and the discussion boards provided the opportunity for social interaction and a sense of community. The findings from this evaluation have been applied to future course offerings and may also inform other interventions for informal caregivers with similar objectives. In addition, this work provides contributions to policy decisions surrounding informal caregiving in Ontario, Canada. / Thesis / Master of Arts (MA)
117

International Intervention and Local Politics

Hameiri, S., Hughes, Caroline, Scarpello, F. 06 January 2020 (has links)
No / International peace- and state-building interventions have become ubiquitous in international politics since the 1990s, aiming to tackle the security problems stemming from the instability afflicting many developing states. Their frequent failures have prompted a shift towards analysing how the interaction between interveners and recipients shapes outcomes. This book critically assesses the rapidly growing literature in international relations and development studies on international intervention and local politics. It advances an innovative approach, placing the politics of scale at the core of the conflicts and compromises shaping the outcomes of international intervention. Different scales - local, national, international - privilege different interests, unevenly allocating power, resources and political opportunity structures. Interveners and recipients thus pursue scalar strategies and socio-political alliances that reinforce their power and marginalise rivals. This approach is harnessed towards examining three prominent case studies of international intervention - Aceh, Cambodia and Solomon Islands - with a focus on public administration reform.
118

The Impact of Personalized Feedback on Marijuana Use: Examining a Brief Intervention Delivered via the Internet

Towe, Sheri Lynn 09 October 2012 (has links)
Marijuana use remains the most commonly used illicit drug in the United States, and many people experience problems related to their marijuana use yet do not seek treatment. Web-based interventions for problematic marijuana use represent a potentially cost-effective and highly accessible way to reach a large number of adults who are ambivalent about changing their marijuana use, or are concerned about seeking in-person counseling for their use. The goal of this online study was to evaluate the effectiveness of a brief web-based feedback intervention for adult marijuana users who reported at least some problems related to their marijuana use. Eighty-two adult college students who reported at least some problems related to marijuana use at baseline were randomized to one of two conditions to examine whether a personalized feedback report would impact marijuana use at follow-up relative to an education control group. Feedback reports were delivered to participants after completion of a baseline assessment battery, and participants were reassessed at one- and three-months post-baseline. Primary outcome variables were problems related to marijuana use and frequency of marijuana use. Main outcome analyses examined change over time by condition as well as possible moderating variables of Stage of Change and family history of problematic substance use. Both marijuana-related problems and marijuana use rates showed some indication of reduction over time at the one-month follow-up, but there were no significant interactions by condition indicative of differential change. These reductions were not sustained at three-months. Analyses across the final follow-up period were likely not significant due to low follow-up completion rates, as well as an overall lower-than-expected sample size. Study recruitment will continue for one additional year to increase sample size for future analyses, but at this time there was no clear evidence the personalized feedback intervention was effective. / Ph. D.
119

A Qualitative Investigation of Principals' Experiences with and Interventions Provided to Gifted Students who have Dropped Out or are At Risk of Dropping Out

Williams, Monica Lynn 30 April 2021 (has links)
This qualitative study investigated principals' experiences with gifted students who have dropped out of school or are at risk of dropping out of school. The research was guided by the following research questions, 1.) What do high school principals indicate are their experiences with gifted dropouts? 2.) What interventions or supports do high school principals indicate were offered to gifted dropouts? and 3.) What interventions or supports do high school principals indicate are being provided to gifted students at-risk of dropping out? The researcher sought to answer these questions by administering a qualitative survey to high schools' principals in southeastern Virginia. The survey was administered via Qualtrics utilizing the Qualitative Survey Questionnaire designed by the researcher. Responses were coded by the researcher and organized by themes. The information derived from this study may assist administrators in identifying the efforts of building leaders to support gifted students who have dropped out or are at risk of dropping out and how to support gifted students before they reach the point of dropping out. The findings of the study indicate that principals have varying experiences with gifted students who have dropped out and gifted students at risk of dropping out. Principals identified academic and non-academic interventions. Principals identified building-level, school division-level, and community-based staff as providing interventions to those students. / Doctor of Education / The purpose of this study was to examine principals' experiences with, and the interventions and supports they provided to gifted students who have either dropped out of school or are at risk of dropping out by answering the following research questions: 1.) What do high school principals indicate are their experiences with gifted dropouts? 2.) What interventions or supports do high school principals indicate were offered to gifted dropouts? and 3.) What interventions or supports do high school principals indicate are being provided to gifted students at-risk of dropping out? To answer these questions, 43 high school principals in southeastern Virginia school divisions were invited to respond to an online survey. The survey was designed by the researcher and consisted of 4 open-ended questions. A total of 17 principals responded to the survey. The findings of the study indicate that principals have varying experiences with gifted students who have dropped out and gifted students at risk of dropping out. Principals identified academic and non-academic interventions. Principals identified building-level, school division-level, and community-based staff as providing interventions to those students.
120

Michael Walzer on the Moral Legitimacy of States and the Morality of Killing in War

Mueller, Nathan 05 July 2006 (has links)
This thesis is divided into two chapters. In the first chapter, I analyze Michael Walzer's account of the moral legitimacy of states. In the second chapter, I analyze his account of the morality of killing in war. I begin the first chapter by contrasting Walzer's account of state legitimacy and humanitarian intervention with that of David Luban. Next, I develop a Rawlsian account of state legitimacy and humanitarian intervention and argue that this account is more plausible than both Walzer's and Luban's accounts. The second chapter is divided into two parts. In the first part, I argue that Walzer's account of the distinction between combatants and noncombatants is misleading because it gives the impression that all and only infantry soldiers are combatants and that all and only civilians are noncombatants. In the second part of the second chapter, I describe an account of the morality of killing in war developed by Jeff McMahan that is based on an analogy with the morality of killing in domestic society and argue that this account is more plausible than Walzer's account of the morality of killing in war. I also suggest a way that McMahan's account could be improved. / Master of Arts

Page generated in 0.1811 seconds