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  • About
  • The Global ETD Search service is a free service for researchers to find electronic theses and dissertations. This service is provided by the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations.
    Our metadata is collected from universities around the world. If you manage a university/consortium/country archive and want to be added, details can be found on the NDLTD website.
61

Mentoring: an examination of the mentoring construct from the perspective of protégé using the act frequency approach /

Russell, Brian, January 1900 (has links)
Thesis (M.B.A.)--Carleton University, 2001. / Includes bibliographical references (p. 109-113). Also available in electronic format on the Internet.
62

Coaching pastors for personal fulfillment and higher levels of professional performance

Wright, Michael W. January 2008 (has links)
Project report (D.Min.)--Golden Gate Baptist Theological Seminary, 2008. / Typescript. Description based on Print version record. Includes bibliographical references (leaves 107-109).
63

How does a developmental relationship mentoring model affect toxicity experienced in mentoring relationships?

Washington, Rhianon S. January 2012 (has links)
Mentoring receives a consistently favourable press and its merits and benefits are widely researched and acclaimed (for example Clutterbuck, 1995 and Harrington, 2011). Some advocates appear almost evangelical in their perspective and responses to the mentoring process. From offender schemes (Tarling, Davison and Clarke, 2004), to initiatives for small businesses (NWDA, 2010), the UK government continues to invest heavily in the concept of mentoring. Despite these plaudits mentoring relationships can occasionally founder and, due to the intensity of the relationship harm can be inflicted on both mentor and mentee alike. Such failing relationships are usually ascribed the provocatively charged label of 'toxic' mentoring (Feldman, 1999; Gray and Smith, 2000). Both the human and financial implications of failed mentoring relationships are a serious problem for government investment. Although a relatively under-researched phenomenon the incidents of negative mentoring experiences are not uncommon (Simon and Eby, 2003). Investment in mentoring has grown, with a proliferation of progressive schemes addressing an array of specific issues, from adult substance misuse (Welsh Assembly, 2009) to workplace gender inequalities (EC, 2007). With investment ranging from thousands of pounds in small scale schemes to hundreds of thousands of pounds, the economic implications of failure are potentially significant. Hamlin and Sage (2011) argue that while research has studied the benefits of mentoring, there is little focus on what constitutes effective mentoring in formal settings, or the interpersonal processes involved. Allen and Poteet (1999:70) noted that research was "desperately needed to assess the specific design features" of successful mentoring programmes. The focus has been on the programmes themselves rather than the individuals within them, and findings have centred on programme improvements and objectives or better matching processes in order to understand successful mentoring (Eby and Lockwood, 2005). The measurement of mentoring success however, is problematic and a uniform model for evaluation remains elusive. In one study (Gaskell, 2007) just 34% of organisations were able to successfully measure the impact of coaching, despite the availability of adequate resources and substantial investment in the programmes. Demonstrating return on investment for enterprises involving soft skills can be challenging, particularly when endeavouring to separate the mentoring aspect from other influencing factors. Establishing return on expectation is however, a more manageable proposition and can prove valuable. Attempts to identify the impact of professional development interventions have generated some innovative approaches such as the 'isolation factor' identified in research by McGovern, Lindemann, Vergara, Murphy, Barker and, Warrenfeltz (2001). The study separates out the effects of coaching but is generated purely from the perspective of the participants, which arguably lacks objectivity. However its success is measured, the popularity of mentoring continues to grow and its benefits remain appreciated (CIMA, 2002). Ineffective mentoring may be avoided through understanding its characteristics and the rationale of failed relationships may prevent repetition, providing a valid objective worthy of further research.
64

The Natural Mentoring Project: A Study Of Natural Mentoring And Associations With Youth Self- Reported GPAs,Aattitudes Towards School And Psychological Well-Being

Jack-James, Danielle 01 December 2015 (has links)
The purpose of the current study was to investigate the relationships between natural mentoring and youth academic achievement, attitudes towards school, and psychological well-being in a cross cultural sample of adolescents. It also sought to investigate whether it is the quality of the mentoring relationship and not simply the categorical presence of a natural mentor that is associated with positive youth outcomes. This study also examined the reliability and validity of the RHI-Y-M. Participants (n = 62) were recruited from two schools in rural Southern Illinois. Youth were asked to complete a survey packet of self-report questionnaires that included measures of attitudes towards school, life satisfaction, stress, and depression. The primary hypotheses were not supported. However, the RHI-Y-M demonstrated good reliability and concurrent validity. Limitations with regards to data collection and statistical power are discussed. The majority of youth identified natural mentors, and there was a significant association between the mentoring relationship and life satisfaction. These findings have implications for community and intervention programs involving youth.
65

Warriors Mentor Warriors: A Cross-Age Mentoring Program

January 2017 (has links)
abstract: Adolescence comes with a multitude of challenges that students must face, while still positively engaging with other students and teachers within the school environment. Eighth grade students, in particular, face issues pertaining to behavior control and behavior problems, which in turn impacts their ability to be successful in a school setting. Cross-Age Mentoring Programs (CAMPs) have been shown to improve youth behavior when youth are matched with individuals who act as positive role models over an extended period of time. The primary function of CAMPs is to assist mentors and mentees in building a strong relationship that consists of trust and empathy, which in turn leads to the ability for mentors to lead mentees towards the achievement of goals. The purpose of this action research study was to introduce an innovation aimed at helping eighth grade students improve their behavior control and behavior problems. The innovation consisted of a nine-week CAMP that paired eight eighth graders with eight eleventh graders at a charter school in Phoenix, Arizona. Mentors and mentees met twice a week before school with the purpose of addressing the behavior control and behavior problem goals that they co-created. Mixed-method data were collected: the quantitative data collection tools were pre- and post-intervention mentee surveys and teacher weekly behavior reports, and the qualitative data collection tools included mentee and mentor journal entries, researcher observations, and mentoring conversation checklists. Results showed that mentors and mentees were able to develop positive close personal relationships with one another, as seen in the researcher observations. In addition to the development of positive relationships, researcher observations, and journal prompt entries provided data to support mentees meeting their goals and mentee self-identification of positive improvement in behavior problems and control. Conversely, there were no significant changes in behavior control and behavior problems as reported on the survey and teacher weekly behavior reports. Attendance and retention of students created challenges in accurately assessing the results of this program; however, consistent with the literature, this study suggests that CAMPs should be sustained longer and with consistent attendance to achieve goals. / Dissertation/Thesis / Doctoral Dissertation Educational Leadership and Policy Studies 2017
66

In what ways does peer coaching contribute to the academic attainment of higher education students?

Andreanoff, Jill January 2015 (has links)
Peer support interventions have been widely used within the Higher Education sector as a means to enhance student success and retention. However, much of the evidence to measure the impact of mentoring and coaching has relied on anecdotal, self-reported evidence from the participants. In addition there is much confusion in the terms to describe peer support interventions making it difficult to compare and contrast the different programmes. The need for evidence of a more robust, quantitative nature has long been called for by a number of authors such as Jacobi (1991), Capstick (2004) and Medd (2012). This is a mixed methods case study of an extant coaching programme in Higher Education in the UK. It makes explicit the process of the peer coaching intervention by use of individual case stories and measures the impact of the peer coaching on academic attainment in the form of module grades. In addition, the use of a control group enables a comparison to be made of the academic attainment of non-coached students with those who received peer coaching. Academic behaviour confidence of those who were coached was also measured pre and post-coaching using the Sander and Sanders (2009) ABC questionnaire. There was found to be a statistically significant impact in the academic attainment of those students who received coaching when compared to those students in the control group who did not. It was seen that the peer coaching had a beneficial impact for particular groups of students such as those in their first year of study and those who were performing less well at the outset as well students within the business school. There was found to be a significant increase in the academic behaviour confidence of those who received coaching as well as a reduced attrition rate when compared to those in the control group.
67

Mentoring Expatriate Employees: The Influence Of Multiple Mentors On Overseas Experiences

Littrell, Lisa 01 January 2007 (has links)
Sending employees overseas for international work assignments has become a popular practice among today's multinational corporations, albeit one fraught with challenges. These expatriate employees, individuals who relocate internationally for work assignments, face many difficulties ranging from problematic adjustment to inadequate preparation. Mentoring has been proposed as one strategy for alleviating the challenges faced by expatriates and for providing the support expatriates need before, during, and after their assignments (Harvey & Wiese, 2002; Mezias & Scandura, 2005). In fact, expatriates that report having a mentor are more likely than expatriates without mentors to have positive career outcomes such as increased job satisfaction and organizational socialization (Feldman & Bolino, 1999; Feldman & Thomas, 1992). Yet, research on expatriate mentoring is still in its infancy as very little empirical research has been conducted. This study will extend past research by 1) investigating the effects of having a mentor and the amount of mentoring provided, 2) exploring the isolated impact of both career development and psychosocial support on expatriate outcomes, and 3) examining the unique impact of mentoring provided by home and host country mentors. The results revealed that the number of mentors that an expatriate reported having was not related to expatriate socialization, cross-cultural adjustment, job satisfaction, intent to remain for the duration of the assignment, or intent to turnover. The results also showed that for the expatriates having two or more mentors, having a diverse group of mentors, that is, at least one mentor from the home country and one mentor from the host country, was not related to any of the expatriate outcomes examined. Further, the results indicated that home and host country colleagues provide unique mentoring functions that predict expatriate outcomes on overseas assignments. Theoretical and practical implications based upon these findings are discussed.
68

Male Allyship from the Perspectives of Women in Technology (Tech.)

Kishore, Piya January 2023 (has links)
This study explores male allyship, a growing trend in the Technology (Tech.) sector from the perspective of women who work or have worked in the industry. This qualitative case study consisted of a sample of ten women and ten self-identified male allies from the industry along with three men and four women who participated exclusively in a focus group discussion. All twenty-seven participants had a standard criteria to qualify as volunteers for the study and were introduced to the same research questions in the interview protocol; 1] how do women identify male allies? 2] how do women learn from male allyship?, and 3] what attributes do male allies possess to be successful in supporting women from the women’s perspective? Findings show that women identified male allies unknowingly and in professional working environments, where male allyship became associated with helping women achieve transformative outcomes in their careers. Bandura’s theory of reciprocal determinism was used as a framework to demonstrate how women are central to driving the learning from male allyship through self-directedness and by operating with agency in their organizational environment. Women described men taking an active stance on behalf of women and being allies in their existing professional responsibilities as the most successful attributes of being an ally. The study concluded with a recommendation to incorporate the study findings into an academic curriculum for men and women interested in practicing allyship in a cohort based academic setting. It also recommended organizations embed allyship in all business activities to help men become better allies to women. This study provides timely guidance for individuals and organizations seeking to engage male allies in gender equity initiatives.
69

Mentorskap as begeleidingshandeling

Dreyer, Johannes Machiel 10 1900 (has links)
Summaries in Afrikaans and English / Text in Afrikaans / In die verhandeling word mentorskap as 'n begeleidingshandeling ondersoek. Die oorsprong van mentorskap word nagespeur, enkele deur tyd beproefde kenmerke van mentorskap word bespreek en heersende praktyke ter bevordering van mentorskap word met die van vervloe eras vergelyk. 'n Uiteenlopende verskeidenheid opvattinge oor mentorskap word aan die orde gestel: benewens die standpunte van eietydse ontwikkelingpsigoloe, beroepskundiges, onderwys- en opvoedkundiges word die klassieke opvatting van mentorskap (socs wat dit weergegee is in die Odusseia en die Les Adventures de Telemaque, die werke van onderskeidelik Homerus en Fenelon) ook ender die loep geplaas. In die laaste afdeling word 'n aantal gevolgtrekkings en aanbevelings gemaak met betrekking tot die doelstellings, aard, kenmerke en waarde van mentorskap, faktore wat die eindresultate van mentorskap kan beinvloed en die bekwaamhede en persoonseienskappe van mentors. Die aanbevelings sluit riglyne vir die effektiewe hantering van problematiese aangeleenthede rondommentorskap, ender meer die verpragmatisering en formalisering daarvan, in. / In this dissertation mentoring as a form of guidance is researched. The origin of mentoring is investigated, a few characteristics of mentoring which have stood the test of time are discussed and prevailing practices promoting mentoring are compared with those of bygone eras. A diverse variety of approaches to mentoring are presented: in addition to the views of contemporary behavioural psychologists, vocationalists, educationists and teaching specialists, the classic interpretation of mentoring (as presented in the Odyssey and the Les Adventures de Telemaque (the works of Homer and Fenelon respectively) is also considered. In the last section a number of conclusions and recommendations are made regarding the aims, nature, characteristics and value of mentoring, factors affecting the outcome of mentoring and the skills and personal characteristics of mentors. The recommendations include guidelines for the effective handling of problematic issues regarding mentoring, such as the pragmatization and formalization thereof. / Educational Studies / M. Ed. (Educational Studies)
70

Mentorskap as begeleidingshandeling

Dreyer, Johannes Machiel 10 1900 (has links)
Summaries in Afrikaans and English / Text in Afrikaans / In die verhandeling word mentorskap as 'n begeleidingshandeling ondersoek. Die oorsprong van mentorskap word nagespeur, enkele deur tyd beproefde kenmerke van mentorskap word bespreek en heersende praktyke ter bevordering van mentorskap word met die van vervloe eras vergelyk. 'n Uiteenlopende verskeidenheid opvattinge oor mentorskap word aan die orde gestel: benewens die standpunte van eietydse ontwikkelingpsigoloe, beroepskundiges, onderwys- en opvoedkundiges word die klassieke opvatting van mentorskap (socs wat dit weergegee is in die Odusseia en die Les Adventures de Telemaque, die werke van onderskeidelik Homerus en Fenelon) ook ender die loep geplaas. In die laaste afdeling word 'n aantal gevolgtrekkings en aanbevelings gemaak met betrekking tot die doelstellings, aard, kenmerke en waarde van mentorskap, faktore wat die eindresultate van mentorskap kan beinvloed en die bekwaamhede en persoonseienskappe van mentors. Die aanbevelings sluit riglyne vir die effektiewe hantering van problematiese aangeleenthede rondommentorskap, ender meer die verpragmatisering en formalisering daarvan, in. / In this dissertation mentoring as a form of guidance is researched. The origin of mentoring is investigated, a few characteristics of mentoring which have stood the test of time are discussed and prevailing practices promoting mentoring are compared with those of bygone eras. A diverse variety of approaches to mentoring are presented: in addition to the views of contemporary behavioural psychologists, vocationalists, educationists and teaching specialists, the classic interpretation of mentoring (as presented in the Odyssey and the Les Adventures de Telemaque (the works of Homer and Fenelon respectively) is also considered. In the last section a number of conclusions and recommendations are made regarding the aims, nature, characteristics and value of mentoring, factors affecting the outcome of mentoring and the skills and personal characteristics of mentors. The recommendations include guidelines for the effective handling of problematic issues regarding mentoring, such as the pragmatization and formalization thereof. / Educational Studies / M. Ed. (Educational Studies)

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