• Refine Query
  • Source
  • Publication year
  • to
  • Language
  • 6
  • 1
  • Tagged with
  • 7
  • 7
  • 7
  • 3
  • 2
  • 2
  • 2
  • 2
  • 2
  • 2
  • 2
  • 2
  • 2
  • 2
  • 2
  • About
  • The Global ETD Search service is a free service for researchers to find electronic theses and dissertations. This service is provided by the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations.
    Our metadata is collected from universities around the world. If you manage a university/consortium/country archive and want to be added, details can be found on the NDLTD website.
1

A Rational-Emotive Therapy Approach to Romantic Jealousy

Marshall, Melissa 12 1900 (has links)
Rational-emotive therapy was proposed as a therapeutic treatment approach to romantic jealousy. It was hypothesized that rational-emotive therapy would be significantly more effective than an attention placebo group in the reduction of romantic jealousy with undergraduate single female subjects. It was also hypothesized that reductions in romantic jealousy would be sustained to a significantly greater extent in the rational-emotive therapy group rather than the attention placebo group on a follow-up evaluation after a 2-month period. Advertisements soliciting single females who were romantically jealous and who felt that this was a problem in their love relationships yielded 18 female subjects from the North Texas State University campus. The pre-treatment, post-treatment, and follow-up assessments consisted of two self-report questionnaires. The pre- and post-treatment also included a physiological measurement (heart rate) while the subject was imagining a jealousy scene. Both of the self-report questionnaires (Sexual Jealousy, Irrational Beliefs) were given to a significant other (such as a boyfriend or lover). Results support the hypothesis that rational-emotive therapy is more effective than an equally credible placebo in the reduction of female romantic jealousy.
2

小学生の対人関係ビリーフに関する研究 : 対人関係ビリーフ尺度(小学生版)の開発

SHINOHARA, Hisato, 篠原, 尚人 27 December 2013 (has links)
No description available.
3

Group Rational Emotive Therapy Versus Usual Group Therapy in Residential Treatment of Alcoholism

Whitley, Michael D. 12 1900 (has links)
The goal of this experiment was to determine whether group rational emotive therapy would prove superior to usual group therapy in improving the psychological functioning of male alcoholics in an inpatient treatment facility and to determine if memory dysfunction would impede therapeutic progress. Four areas of psychological functioning were discussed for their relevance to etiology, recidivism, and treatment evaluation; they were depression, self-conception, social anxiety, and cognitive functioning. Further, rational emotive therapy as a potentially superior treatment for alcoholism was discussed and outcome research was reviewed.
4

Differential Response of Speech-Anxious Repressors and Sensitizers to Systematic Desensitization and Rational-Emotive Therapy

Beck, Karen Eileen 12 1900 (has links)
There is a scarcity of objective criteria upon which to select among the available therapies for those most likely to benefit specific patients. Comparative research has suggested that the outcomes of alternative and competitive therapies are equivalent. There are few facts available concerning which patients benefit most from even the more popular therapies. The purpose of this study was to find a type of patient for which differential improvement could be predicted. Neither therapy decreased checklist scores or increased speaking time significantly more than the other. Repressors and sensitizers responded equally to therapy. When dropout rates were analyzed there were also no significant differences between the therapies or between repressors and sensitizers. When posttherapy scores from both therapies were compared to pretherapy scores, no significant changes were found. The latter finding was important for understanding the absence of support for the hypotheses. Since the subjects did not improve as a result of either desensitization or rational-emotive therapy, there was no opportunity to observe the hypothesized differential changes. Given this hindsight, it was concluded that speech anxiety may not be a desirable disorder with which to study the prediction that repression-sensitization is related to the outcome of rational-emotive therapy and desensitization. It was recommended that future research of this relationship utilize a disorder for which therapeutic effectiveness is more firmly established.
5

A Comparison of Adjunct Computer-Assisted Instruction and Traditional Instruction for Teaching Counseling Theories

Sampson, Donald E. (Donald Eugene) 05 1900 (has links)
This study examined differences in achievement over Person- Centered Therapy and Rational-Emotive Therapy taught by adjunct computer-assisted instruction tutorials (CAI) and traditional instruction (TI). The Achievement Instrument Over Person-Centered Therapy and Rational-Emotive Therapy was developed by the researcher to measure achievement. Content validity and test-retest reliability were established for the test. Analysis of covariance was utilized to test for differences in achievement gains between the CAI and TI groups. Cumulative university grade point averages and achievement pre-test scores were covariates. The Kolmogorov-Smirnov test was used to determine if the distribution of scores following instruction would be more positively skewed for the CAI group than for the TI group. This effect was expected if CAI was more effective than TI for low ability students.
6

Cognitive coping strategies for parents with learning disabled children

Maharaj, Malthi 01 1900 (has links)
Although thet:e has been gradual awat:eness of leat:ning disabilities aftet: Wodd Wat: II, it was in the late 1960's that compt:ehensive assessment and special education wet:e provided in schools. Specifically, in the at:ea of services for families, a reaffirmation of the fundamental rights of chilruen and families emerges. Although stress associated with the presence of a learning disabled child is an important consideration, its impact on the family is related to the family members' cognitive appraisal of the stress situation and thett copmg resources. Parents of learning disabled chilruen experience more stress, often exacerbated by faulty, misunderstood coping efforts that increase conflict in the family. Reseat:chers have investigated how: families manage stress; and cope with the multiple stt:esses of rearing a learning disabled children. It has been found that while many families cope, others cannot. Stress theory has dttected our attention to circumstances that weaken families and exacerbate distress. Preventative and ameliorative services at:e needed to assist such families. Stress and coping theory suggest that differences in families' reactions to learning disabilities may be related to amount and quality of resources available to pat:ents. This involves cognitive adaptation using coping skills, enabling them to t:e-evaluate stressful events positively. Another resource would be professionals, whose role would be of a facilitator, strengthening the ability of the family to gain access to needed services while increasing the family's mastery of coping with learning disability. Research has shown that parents' initial contact with learning disability and how to assist their learning disabled child was stressful. After parents received counselling on coping with their stress and stress management, and after the child's psycho-educational assessment and remedial measures were implemented, there has been significant positive feedback from parents and children. Research would embrace relationships between perceptions and family well-being using Ellis's rational-emotive therapy, thereby contributing to better understanding of how families cope with stress. Ayurvedic principles would be used to adopt a holistic approach to life. By using RET and A yurvedics the researcher was able to assist parents with learning disabled children to cope better with their stresses and effectively manage their child's learning disability. / Psychology of Education / D. Ed. (Psychology of Education)
7

Cognitive coping strategies for parents with learning disabled children

Maharaj, Malthi 01 1900 (has links)
Although thet:e has been gradual awat:eness of leat:ning disabilities aftet: Wodd Wat: II, it was in the late 1960's that compt:ehensive assessment and special education wet:e provided in schools. Specifically, in the at:ea of services for families, a reaffirmation of the fundamental rights of chilruen and families emerges. Although stress associated with the presence of a learning disabled child is an important consideration, its impact on the family is related to the family members' cognitive appraisal of the stress situation and thett copmg resources. Parents of learning disabled chilruen experience more stress, often exacerbated by faulty, misunderstood coping efforts that increase conflict in the family. Reseat:chers have investigated how: families manage stress; and cope with the multiple stt:esses of rearing a learning disabled children. It has been found that while many families cope, others cannot. Stress theory has dttected our attention to circumstances that weaken families and exacerbate distress. Preventative and ameliorative services at:e needed to assist such families. Stress and coping theory suggest that differences in families' reactions to learning disabilities may be related to amount and quality of resources available to pat:ents. This involves cognitive adaptation using coping skills, enabling them to t:e-evaluate stressful events positively. Another resource would be professionals, whose role would be of a facilitator, strengthening the ability of the family to gain access to needed services while increasing the family's mastery of coping with learning disability. Research has shown that parents' initial contact with learning disability and how to assist their learning disabled child was stressful. After parents received counselling on coping with their stress and stress management, and after the child's psycho-educational assessment and remedial measures were implemented, there has been significant positive feedback from parents and children. Research would embrace relationships between perceptions and family well-being using Ellis's rational-emotive therapy, thereby contributing to better understanding of how families cope with stress. Ayurvedic principles would be used to adopt a holistic approach to life. By using RET and A yurvedics the researcher was able to assist parents with learning disabled children to cope better with their stresses and effectively manage their child's learning disability. / Psychology of Education / D. Ed. (Psychology of Education)

Page generated in 0.1326 seconds