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  • About
  • The Global ETD Search service is a free service for researchers to find electronic theses and dissertations. This service is provided by the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations.
    Our metadata is collected from universities around the world. If you manage a university/consortium/country archive and want to be added, details can be found on the NDLTD website.
41

Weather symbolism in DBZ Ntuli's literature

Mncube, Gedion Juba George 28 February 2006 (has links)
This study deals with weather symbolism in DBZ Ntuli's literature. Chapter one describes the aim, biography of DBZ Ntuli, definition of important literary concepts, the scope and the methodology. Chapter two considers the symbolic use of mist, fog, overcast weather and clouds. Each of these aspects is defined and is studied under each genre, i.e. in terms of its use by Ntuli in prose, drama and poetry. Chapter three explores the symbolic usage of rain, thunder and the rainbow in all the genres in which Ntuli writes. Chapter four deals with the imagery of the sun. The sun is shown as exhibiting three distinct levels of heat: mild, hot and extremely hot. Chapter five deals with the symbol of cold weather. Its aspects can be perceived on two levels: cold weather and extremely cold weather. Chapter six is a general conclusion that reveals the outcome of the research, observations and the recommendations. / African Languages / M.A. (African Languages)
42

Weather symbolism in DBZ Ntuli's literature

Mncube, Gedion Juba George 28 February 2006 (has links)
This study deals with weather symbolism in DBZ Ntuli's literature. Chapter one describes the aim, biography of DBZ Ntuli, definition of important literary concepts, the scope and the methodology. Chapter two considers the symbolic use of mist, fog, overcast weather and clouds. Each of these aspects is defined and is studied under each genre, i.e. in terms of its use by Ntuli in prose, drama and poetry. Chapter three explores the symbolic usage of rain, thunder and the rainbow in all the genres in which Ntuli writes. Chapter four deals with the imagery of the sun. The sun is shown as exhibiting three distinct levels of heat: mild, hot and extremely hot. Chapter five deals with the symbol of cold weather. Its aspects can be perceived on two levels: cold weather and extremely cold weather. Chapter six is a general conclusion that reveals the outcome of the research, observations and the recommendations. / African Languages / M.A. (African Languages)
43

[en] DEVELOPMENT OF A PHYSICAL MODEL FOR THE ANALYSIS OF THUNDER EFFECTS IN SOILS / [pt] DESENVOLVIMENTO DE UM MODELO FÍSICO PARA A ANÁLISE DE EFEITOS DE TROVÕES EM SOLOS

THIAGO DE SOUZA CARNAVALE 21 November 2018 (has links)
[pt] O trabalho foi motivado pela grande incidência de descargas atmosféricas no desastre ocorrido na Região Serrana do Estado do Rio de Janeiro, em 2011. No episódio foram contabilizados mais de 900 óbitos e até o presente momento, as causas dos escorregamentos ainda não foram completamente encontradas. Esta pesquisa apresenta o desenvolvimento de um modelo físico para avaliar os efeitos das ondas sonoras, oriundas dos trovões, em solos. Para o alcance do referido objetivo, foi desenvolvida uma câmara à qual um bloco indeformado de solo foi instrumentado com tensiômetros, TDR s e acelerômetros. Os materiais utilizados nos ensaios são provenientes da encosta situada nos domínios da PUC-Rio e do condomínio localizado no bairro de Conquista - Nova Friburgo. Os solos foram dispostos em blocos livres ou confinados em uma caixa de compensado naval de 19 mm e a seguir os mesmo foram submetidos às ondas de sonoras replicadas da modelagem dos trovões. Os resultados abrangem o desenvolvimento de ensaios com umidades diferentes, para os dois tipos de materiais, nas condições livre e confinada, e foram satisfatórios. / [en] The work was motivated by the high incidence of lightning in the disaster occurred in the mountainous region of the State of Rio de Janeiro in 2011. In the episode was recorded more than 900 deaths and up to the present time, the causes of landslides have not been fully met. This research presents the development of a physical model to assess the effects of sound waves coming from the thunder in soils. To achieve the above goal, we developed a camera to which an undisturbed block of soil, instrumented with tensiometers and TDR s accelerometers was tested on a table. The materials used in the tests are from hillside located in the areas of PUC-Rio and condo located in the Conquista, Nova Friburgo. Soils were willing blocks free or confined in a box of 19mm plywood and then were subjected to the sound waves replicated modeling of thunder. The results include the development of assays with different humidities for both types of materials and conditions, free and confined.
44

Evaluating a Sustainable Community Development Initiative Among the Lakota People on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation

Mosman, Sarah A. 12 1900 (has links)
This thesis details my applied thesis project and experience in the evaluation of a workforce development through sustainable construction program. It describes the need of my client, Sweet Grass Consulting and their contractual partner, the Thunder Valley Community Development Corporation, in the evaluation of Thunder Valley CDC's Workforce Development through Sustainable Construction Program. My role involved the development of an extensive evaluation package for this program and data analysis of evaluation materials to support Thunder Valley CDC's grant-funded Workforce Development Program. I place the efforts of Thunder Valley CDC in the context of their community, the Pine Ridge Reservation of the Lakota People, and within an historical and contemporary context to highlight the implications of the efforts of Thunder Valley CDC. Using the theoretical frameworks of cultural revitalization and community economic development, I attempt to highlight two important components of Thunder Valley CDC's community development efforts - cultural revitalization for social healing, and development that emphasizes social, community and individual well-being. Thunder Valley CDC's Workforce Development through Sustainable Construction Program is still in its early stages, and so this first year of implementation very much represented a pilot phase. However, while specific successes are difficult to measure at this point, general successes are viewable in the daily operations of Thunder Valley CDC that exemplify their stated mision and goals. These successes include initiatives that holistically address community needs; relevancy in the eyes of the community they serve; support for the community and for Program participants' unique challenges; and a cultural restoration and revitalization emphasis that underlies and strengthens all of this. The program thus has the potential to provide a model for community development by challenging dominant "development" paradigms and utilizing community resources and assets for community development that reflects the community's values and worldviews.
45

The Mineralogical Composition of House Dust in Ontario, Canada

Woldemichael, Michael Haile 01 February 2012 (has links)
Despite increasing concern about the presence of heavy metals, pesticides and other toxins in indoor environments, very little is known about the physical and chemical composition of ordinary household dust. This study represents the first systematic investigation of the mineralogical composition of indoor dust in residential housing in Canada. Specimens of dust were obtained from homes in six geographically separate cities in the Province of Ontario: two located on the metamorphic and igneous rocks of the Precambrian Canadian Shield (Thunder Bay and Sudbury), the other four located on Palaeozoic limestone and shale dominated bedrock (Barrie, Burlington, Cambridge, and Hamilton). Forty samples of household vacuum dust were obtained. The coarse fraction (80 – 300 µm) of this dust was subjected to flotation (using water) to separate the organic components (e.g. insect fragments, dander), natural and synthetic materials (e.g. fibres, plastics) from the mineral residue. The mineral fraction was then analyzed using quantitative point counting, polarizing light microscopy, powder X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy methods. Despite the great distances between the sampling localities and the distinct differences in bedrock geology, the mineral fraction of dust from all six cities is remarkably similar and dominated by quartz and feldspar, followed by lithic fragments, calcite, and amphibole. Some evidence of the influence of local geology can nevertheless be found. For example, a relatively higher proportion of sulphide minerals is observed in the two cities on the Canadian Shield where these minerals are clearly more abundant in the bedrock. Specimens from Sudbury, Canada’s largest mining centre located atop a nickel-sulphide mineral deposit, showed the highest sulphide contents. Quartz is the dominant mineral in all cities. All quartz grains have internal strain features and fluid inclusions that are indicative of a metamorphic-igneous provenance. In all cities, sand is used on the streets as an abrasive for traction during the icy winter season. This sand is obtained in all cases from local glaciofluvial deposits that were ultimately derived principally from the rocks of the Canadian Shield in the last Pleistocene glaciations that affected all of Ontario. Thus, tracking in sand is the most plausible mechanism by which quartz was introduced into these homes since sampling was done, in all cases, in the winter season. The results indicate that glacial deposits dominate the mineral composition of indoor dust in Ontario cities and that nature of the bedrock immediately underlying the sampling sites is relatively of minor importance.
46

The Mineralogical Composition of House Dust in Ontario, Canada

Woldemichael, Michael Haile 01 February 2012 (has links)
Despite increasing concern about the presence of heavy metals, pesticides and other toxins in indoor environments, very little is known about the physical and chemical composition of ordinary household dust. This study represents the first systematic investigation of the mineralogical composition of indoor dust in residential housing in Canada. Specimens of dust were obtained from homes in six geographically separate cities in the Province of Ontario: two located on the metamorphic and igneous rocks of the Precambrian Canadian Shield (Thunder Bay and Sudbury), the other four located on Palaeozoic limestone and shale dominated bedrock (Barrie, Burlington, Cambridge, and Hamilton). Forty samples of household vacuum dust were obtained. The coarse fraction (80 – 300 µm) of this dust was subjected to flotation (using water) to separate the organic components (e.g. insect fragments, dander), natural and synthetic materials (e.g. fibres, plastics) from the mineral residue. The mineral fraction was then analyzed using quantitative point counting, polarizing light microscopy, powder X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy methods. Despite the great distances between the sampling localities and the distinct differences in bedrock geology, the mineral fraction of dust from all six cities is remarkably similar and dominated by quartz and feldspar, followed by lithic fragments, calcite, and amphibole. Some evidence of the influence of local geology can nevertheless be found. For example, a relatively higher proportion of sulphide minerals is observed in the two cities on the Canadian Shield where these minerals are clearly more abundant in the bedrock. Specimens from Sudbury, Canada’s largest mining centre located atop a nickel-sulphide mineral deposit, showed the highest sulphide contents. Quartz is the dominant mineral in all cities. All quartz grains have internal strain features and fluid inclusions that are indicative of a metamorphic-igneous provenance. In all cities, sand is used on the streets as an abrasive for traction during the icy winter season. This sand is obtained in all cases from local glaciofluvial deposits that were ultimately derived principally from the rocks of the Canadian Shield in the last Pleistocene glaciations that affected all of Ontario. Thus, tracking in sand is the most plausible mechanism by which quartz was introduced into these homes since sampling was done, in all cases, in the winter season. The results indicate that glacial deposits dominate the mineral composition of indoor dust in Ontario cities and that nature of the bedrock immediately underlying the sampling sites is relatively of minor importance.
47

The Mineralogical Composition of House Dust in Ontario, Canada

Woldemichael, Michael Haile 01 February 2012 (has links)
Despite increasing concern about the presence of heavy metals, pesticides and other toxins in indoor environments, very little is known about the physical and chemical composition of ordinary household dust. This study represents the first systematic investigation of the mineralogical composition of indoor dust in residential housing in Canada. Specimens of dust were obtained from homes in six geographically separate cities in the Province of Ontario: two located on the metamorphic and igneous rocks of the Precambrian Canadian Shield (Thunder Bay and Sudbury), the other four located on Palaeozoic limestone and shale dominated bedrock (Barrie, Burlington, Cambridge, and Hamilton). Forty samples of household vacuum dust were obtained. The coarse fraction (80 – 300 µm) of this dust was subjected to flotation (using water) to separate the organic components (e.g. insect fragments, dander), natural and synthetic materials (e.g. fibres, plastics) from the mineral residue. The mineral fraction was then analyzed using quantitative point counting, polarizing light microscopy, powder X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy methods. Despite the great distances between the sampling localities and the distinct differences in bedrock geology, the mineral fraction of dust from all six cities is remarkably similar and dominated by quartz and feldspar, followed by lithic fragments, calcite, and amphibole. Some evidence of the influence of local geology can nevertheless be found. For example, a relatively higher proportion of sulphide minerals is observed in the two cities on the Canadian Shield where these minerals are clearly more abundant in the bedrock. Specimens from Sudbury, Canada’s largest mining centre located atop a nickel-sulphide mineral deposit, showed the highest sulphide contents. Quartz is the dominant mineral in all cities. All quartz grains have internal strain features and fluid inclusions that are indicative of a metamorphic-igneous provenance. In all cities, sand is used on the streets as an abrasive for traction during the icy winter season. This sand is obtained in all cases from local glaciofluvial deposits that were ultimately derived principally from the rocks of the Canadian Shield in the last Pleistocene glaciations that affected all of Ontario. Thus, tracking in sand is the most plausible mechanism by which quartz was introduced into these homes since sampling was done, in all cases, in the winter season. The results indicate that glacial deposits dominate the mineral composition of indoor dust in Ontario cities and that nature of the bedrock immediately underlying the sampling sites is relatively of minor importance.
48

The Mineralogical Composition of House Dust in Ontario, Canada

Woldemichael, Michael Haile January 2012 (has links)
Despite increasing concern about the presence of heavy metals, pesticides and other toxins in indoor environments, very little is known about the physical and chemical composition of ordinary household dust. This study represents the first systematic investigation of the mineralogical composition of indoor dust in residential housing in Canada. Specimens of dust were obtained from homes in six geographically separate cities in the Province of Ontario: two located on the metamorphic and igneous rocks of the Precambrian Canadian Shield (Thunder Bay and Sudbury), the other four located on Palaeozoic limestone and shale dominated bedrock (Barrie, Burlington, Cambridge, and Hamilton). Forty samples of household vacuum dust were obtained. The coarse fraction (80 – 300 µm) of this dust was subjected to flotation (using water) to separate the organic components (e.g. insect fragments, dander), natural and synthetic materials (e.g. fibres, plastics) from the mineral residue. The mineral fraction was then analyzed using quantitative point counting, polarizing light microscopy, powder X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy methods. Despite the great distances between the sampling localities and the distinct differences in bedrock geology, the mineral fraction of dust from all six cities is remarkably similar and dominated by quartz and feldspar, followed by lithic fragments, calcite, and amphibole. Some evidence of the influence of local geology can nevertheless be found. For example, a relatively higher proportion of sulphide minerals is observed in the two cities on the Canadian Shield where these minerals are clearly more abundant in the bedrock. Specimens from Sudbury, Canada’s largest mining centre located atop a nickel-sulphide mineral deposit, showed the highest sulphide contents. Quartz is the dominant mineral in all cities. All quartz grains have internal strain features and fluid inclusions that are indicative of a metamorphic-igneous provenance. In all cities, sand is used on the streets as an abrasive for traction during the icy winter season. This sand is obtained in all cases from local glaciofluvial deposits that were ultimately derived principally from the rocks of the Canadian Shield in the last Pleistocene glaciations that affected all of Ontario. Thus, tracking in sand is the most plausible mechanism by which quartz was introduced into these homes since sampling was done, in all cases, in the winter season. The results indicate that glacial deposits dominate the mineral composition of indoor dust in Ontario cities and that nature of the bedrock immediately underlying the sampling sites is relatively of minor importance.
49

The Composition and Distribution of Coal-Ash Deposits Under Reducing and Oxidizing Conditions From a Suite of Eight Coals

Brunner, David R. 09 April 2011 (has links) (PDF)
Eighteen elements, including: carbon, oxygen, sodium, magnesium, aluminum, silicon, phosphorus, sulfur, chlorine, potassium, calcium, titanium, chromium, manganese, iron, nickel, strontium, and barium were measured using a scanning electron microscope with energy dispersive spectroscopy from deposits. The deposits were collected by burning eight different coals in a 160 kWth, staged, down-fired, swirl-stabilized combustor. Both up-stream and down-stream deposits from an oxidizing region (equivalence ratio 0.86) and reducing region (equivalence ratio 1.15) were collected. Within the deposits, the particle size and morphology were studied. The average particle cross-sectional area from the up-stream deposits ranged from 10 - 75 µm2 and had a standard deviation of 36 - 340 µm2. These up-stream particles were of various shapes: spherical, previously molten particles; irregular particle that had not melted, hollowed spherical shells; and layered or strands of particles. These particles were a mixture of burned and unburned coal being deposited at various stages of burnout and having completed some burnout after deposition. The average particle cross-sectional area from the down-stream deposits ranged 0.9 - 7 µm2 and the standard deviation range of 2.6 - 30 µm2. The shape of the particles on the bottom sleeves are typically spherical indicating melting prior to deposition. Particles contained a distribution of elemental compositions that were not tightly grouped on ternary phase diagrams. This indicated that particles were not single compounds or phases but each particle contained a mixture of multiple compounds. Coals' deposit sulfur was strongly correlated with the calcium and iron content of the ASTM ash analysis. The low rank sub-bituminous and lignite coals that had high calcium content produced high sulfur deposits, particularly in the oxidizing region, down-stream deposits. The high iron bituminous coals, also produced high sulfur deposits, but more so in the reducing region, up-stream deposits. The low calcium and low iron coals produced low sulfur deposits. Mahoning was an exception being high in iron content but remaining low in sulfur content in the deposit. Gatling coal showed numerous deposit particles that contained only iron and sulfur consistent with the high pyrite content of Gatling coal. The average concentration of chlorine was insignificant in all of the deposits with the concentration being less than 100 ppm. Individual particles containing chlorine were found and were associated with potassium, sodium, and iron.

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