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  • About
  • The Global ETD Search service is a free service for researchers to find electronic theses and dissertations. This service is provided by the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations.
    Our metadata is collected from universities around the world. If you manage a university/consortium/country archive and want to be added, details can be found on the NDLTD website.
1

Extra-territorial forays and vocal behaviour in the female Acadian flycatcher (Empidonax virescens) /

Hung, Stephanie. January 2008 (has links)
Thesis (M.Sc.)--York University, 2008. Graduate Programme in Biology. / Typescript. Includes bibliographical references (leaves 25-31). Also available on the Internet. MODE OF ACCESS via web browser by entering the following URL: http://gateway.proquest.com/openurl?url_ver=Z39.88-2004&res_dat=xri:pqdiss&rft_val_fmt=info:ofi/fmt:kev:mtx:dissertation&rft_dat=xri:pqdiss:MR45945
2

From Acadian to Africadian, Translation and Analysis of Georgette LeBlanc’s Amédé: A Case Study in Translating Sociolect

Dow, Eric 08 May 2018 (has links)
This thesis will serve as a case study on the translation of sociolectal literature, using my translation into English of Acadian author Georgette LeBlanc’s second collection of poetry, Amédé, as a paradigm. Written in the Baie Sainte-Marie Acadian French sociolect, this work represents an interesting example of the difficulties that can arise while translating minority language literature, from both a linguistic and discursive perspective. Broadly speaking, the objective of my analysis will be to explore the relationship between the literary representation of sociolect and the creation of underlying networks of meaning, focusing on both the linguistic and discursive aspects of LeBlanc’s choices in portraying Baie Sainte-Marie Acadian French in order to justify my translation of her work into African Nova Scotian English, also referred to as Africadian English.
3

France Daigle's Pour sûr: proposing a lusory critical approach

Roy, Monique A. 05 February 2019 (has links)
This dissertation examines the fiction of contemporary Acadian writer France Daigle and proposes a new critical approach to her latest novel, Pour sûr, which was published in 2011. Pour sûr is a 747 page polyphonic, hypertext novel written in fragments that are organized into 144 categories of 12 fragments each. The novel is notable for its metafictional, encyclopedic qualities but also for its skillful and expansive use of Chiac, the most recent iteration of Acadian French that is spoken in the Moncton/Dieppe region of New Brunswick, Canada. Chapter 1 follows the trajectory of Daigle’s relationship to this language over the span of her thirty-year writing career. My analysis shows how her continued ambivalence toward Chiac is a source of a major transformation that occurs in Pour sûr, in which Chiac becomes a legible mode of representation that makes Daigle’s creative goals possible. In chapter 2, the unusual and creative form and structure of Daigle’s novels are analyzed, along with the evolution of several aspects of her work, including metafictional, structural, and thematic elements that are present in multiple texts. I identify the innovations that make Pour sûr so different from the earlier novels and propose a closer analysis of its game-like qualities in particular. Pour sûr engages its readers and critics by requiring a high level of participation, which transforms their approach to the text. Thus, in chapter 3, I explore the ways in which this novel can be conceived of as a kind of game, and the ways in which these game-playing aspects of the text motivate readers to continue reading and re-reading it, with different experiences and interpretations each time. Here a lusory critical approach is proposed, which is informed by both reader-response criticism and more recent work in the field of game studies. Finally, I argue that Daigle, by creating a kind of hyperreality (as conceived by theorists like Jean Baudrillard and Umberto Eco), ultimately aims to shape the horizon of expectations of her reading public.
4

Acadian Accordion Music in South Eastern New Brunswick

Cormier, Joel 05 January 2012 (has links)
Instrumental folk music has flourished in south eastern New Brunswick and the accordion, while a relative newcomer to the region, enjoys great popularity. Over the years, accordion players have filled many roles, from providing wedding music, to entertainment for house parties. However, there has been a lack of scholarly work done on the subject, especially when compared with folksongs, which have been the object of many studies. To date, little has been written on Acadian instrumental music in New Brunswick and there has been nothing written specifically on the accordion. The main focus of this work is a study, transcription, and analysis of accordion pieces collected from players in south eastern New Brunswick between 2007 and 2011. Some time is also spent on detailing the history of the accordion in the region, talking about the players themselves, as well as looking at the role of the instrument and its repertoire in a constantly changing world. The pieces in question were collected over a four year period in various venues, including accordion festivals and players’ places of residence; archival recordings were also consulted. The pieces were transcribed and afterwards analyzed and categorized. Multiple recordings of the same piece were checked for variations, which were found to be an important part of the style of the region. Historical data is often based on personal accounts, which were taken during interviews with players from the region. The accordion remains popular in the region and is adapting to changing circumstances. The annual accordion festivals occurring in Moncton every summer are providing new venues to keep the instrument relevant. This study will help to bring further attention to the instrument, stimulate new research, and perhaps even attract new younger players.
5

Acadian Accordion Music in South Eastern New Brunswick

Cormier, Joel 05 January 2012 (has links)
Instrumental folk music has flourished in south eastern New Brunswick and the accordion, while a relative newcomer to the region, enjoys great popularity. Over the years, accordion players have filled many roles, from providing wedding music, to entertainment for house parties. However, there has been a lack of scholarly work done on the subject, especially when compared with folksongs, which have been the object of many studies. To date, little has been written on Acadian instrumental music in New Brunswick and there has been nothing written specifically on the accordion. The main focus of this work is a study, transcription, and analysis of accordion pieces collected from players in south eastern New Brunswick between 2007 and 2011. Some time is also spent on detailing the history of the accordion in the region, talking about the players themselves, as well as looking at the role of the instrument and its repertoire in a constantly changing world. The pieces in question were collected over a four year period in various venues, including accordion festivals and players’ places of residence; archival recordings were also consulted. The pieces were transcribed and afterwards analyzed and categorized. Multiple recordings of the same piece were checked for variations, which were found to be an important part of the style of the region. Historical data is often based on personal accounts, which were taken during interviews with players from the region. The accordion remains popular in the region and is adapting to changing circumstances. The annual accordion festivals occurring in Moncton every summer are providing new venues to keep the instrument relevant. This study will help to bring further attention to the instrument, stimulate new research, and perhaps even attract new younger players.
6

Francophone and Acadian Experiences in the Primary Health Care System in Halifax, Nova Scotia

Aubé, Caila 16 August 2013 (has links)
Objectives: This research explored the experiences of francophones and Acadians who received primary healthcare in Halifax, Nova Scotia. Approach: Semi-structured interviews were completed with 15 self-identified francophones or Acadians. Participants provided feedback on the preliminary phenomenological analysis and final results were determined based on the analysis and participant feedback. Results: Language, culture and community were central in participants’ experiences but despite the high importance placed on receiving French language health care services, participants often had to compromise and access services in English. Other influences included the strategies they developed to utilise English services and their perception of health care professionals’ sensitivity for their linguistic barriers and needs. Conclusion: Though it was not always easy or straightforward participants in the study were able to utilise health services but not always in French. Creating situations that may require them to relinquish their language and, to some extent, their cultural identity.
7

Implications of Silurian granite genesis to the tectonic history of the Nashoba terrane, Eastern Massachusetts

Dabrowski, Daniel January 2014 (has links)
Thesis advisor: J. Christopher Hepburn / The Nashoba terrane is a highly metamorphosed and sheared Paleozoic tectonic block in eastern Massachusetts. The metamorphic rocks that compose the terrane are intruded by a series of diorites, tonalites, and granites. The Andover Granite is a complex multiphase granitic suite found in the northern part of the Nashoba terrane and is composed of both foliated and unfoliated granites as well as a granodiorite phase. The Sgr Group of granites is a series of unfoliated granites exposed along the Nashoba-Avalon terrane boundary. New crystallization ages for the foliated Andover Granite and the Sudbury Granite, southernmost body of the Sgr Group of granites, are presented. CA-TIMS U-Pb geochronology on zircons collected from these granites yielded 419.43 ± 0.52 Ma and 419.65 ± 0.51 Ma crystallization ages for the foliated Andover Granite and a 420.49 ± 0.52 Ma crystallization age for the Sudbury Granite. Geochemical and petrographic analysis of these granites indicate that the foliated Andover Granite is a high-K calc-alkaline, peralmuminous, S-type, biotite + muscovite granite and the Sudbury granite is high-K calc-alkaline, metaluminous to slightly peraluminous, I-type, biotite granite. These two granites are interpreted to have formed from the anatexis of either Nashoba terrane metasedimentary rocks and/or its underlying basement just prior to the Acadian orogeny. It is proposed that when Silurian diorite/tonalite magmas intruded into the Nashoba terrane, the influx of magmatic heat was sufficient to trigger crustal melting and promote granite genesis. This petrogenetic scenario fits well with regional tectonic models showing the Silurio-Devonian convergence of Avalonia towards Ganderia (which formed the eastern side of composite Laurentia at the time) in the northern Appalachians. Prior to the collision of Avalonia to composite Laurentia, mafic and intermediate composition arc magmas intruded the eastern Ganderian margin. The large amount of heat that accompanied these intrusions is believed to have contributed to Acadian metamorphism and influenced the formation of granitic plutons along the margin. It is therefore proposed that the plutonic record of the Nashoba terrane shows that by the Late Silurian - Early Devonian, Avalonia was still outboard of Laurentia in the vicinity of southern New England. / Thesis (MS) — Boston College, 2014. / Submitted to: Boston College. Graduate School of Arts and Sciences. / Discipline: Earth and Environmental Sciences.
8

Nest-site selection and productivity of the acadian flycatcher (Empidonax virescens) in the southwestern Appalachian Mountains of Virginia

Lewis, Jason P. January 1999 (has links)
I studied the nest-site selection of the Acadian Flycatcher (Empidonax virescens) in the George Washington National Forest of southwestern Virginia from early May through July 1996 and 1997. Data were collected from nine 30 ha study plots. I measured habitat features at 37 Acadian Flycatcher nests and compared them to 30 nonuse sites randomly selected within the vegetation types associated with nests. Because Acadian Flycatchers have a strong riparian habitat association for nest-site selection, nonuse sites were established along riparian corridors not occupied by nesting flycatchers. Data also were collected to determine relationships between microhabitat characteristics and nesting success of the Acadian Flycatcher. Nest-sites were associated with a more mature or climax community, as evident from the high percentage (75%) of nests in eastern hemlock (Tsuga canadensis), a climax community tree species and the greater basal area found at nest-sites over nonuse sites. Nest-sites also had lower small stem density and ground cover than nonuse sites. Nest-sites were always found near streams, although I found no conclusive evidence that any stream characteristic influenced nest-site selection. Habitat features did not differ between successful and depredated nests. Brood parasitism by Brown-headed Cowbirds (Molothrus ater) was not a major factor in the reproductive success of Acadian Flycatchers (only a 2% parasitism rate); depredation accounted for the majority of nest failures. These results suggest that silviculture activities near riparian corridors could drastically reduce habitat availability and subsequently contribute to population declines of the Acadian Flycatcher. Future research should focus on determining the size of riparian buffer strips needed to retain this species along riparian corridors in the Appalachian Mountains. This strategy can be applied to the current downtown revitalization efforts by the City of Muncie. The ideas and general theories can also be applied by small Indiana towns which suffer from economic problems. A comprehensive plan that is tailored specifically for a downtown which account for the organization, design, economic, and promotion needs of downtown will set the course for successful commercial revitalization. / Department of Biology
9

Avian nest survival and breeding density in cottonwood plantations and native forest fragments in southeast Missouri

Pruett, Michael Shane, Thompson, Frank R. Heitmeyer, Mickey E. January 2008 (has links)
Title from PDF of title page (University of Missouri--Columbia, viewed on Feb. 24, 2010). The entire thesis text is included in the research.pdf file; the official abstract appears in the short.pdf file; a non-technical public abstract appears in the public.pdf file. Dr. Frank Thompson and Dr. Mickey Heitmeyer, Dissertation Supervisors. Vita. Includes bibliographical references.
10

The Relationship Between Magmatism and Deformation During the Acadian Orogeny: A Case Study from Eastern-Central Vermont

Lagor, Samuel William 01 January 2016 (has links)
The Silurian-Devonian metasedimentary rocks of the Connecticut Valley-Gaspé trough (CVGT) were subjected to multiple deformational and metamorphic events during the Acadian orogeny in the Middle-Late Devonian. Plutons intruding the Devonian Waits River and Gile Mountain Formations have been considered post-tectonic, but microstructural studies of the intrusions and their metamorphic aureoles indicate some of these plutons intruded syntectonically. This study investigates the relationship between Acadian deformation and intrusion of the Knox Mountain pluton (KMP) of central Vermont. Structural and geochronological data were collected along a c. 15 km transect from the western limit of the CVGT, where the unconformable Richardson Memorial Contact coincides with the Dog River Fault Zone, into the margin of the KMP in the east. Field and microstructural observations indicate the KMP intruded syntectonically. Evidence for Acadian deformation post-dating intrusion includes folded and boudinaged granitic dikes at the margin of the KMP, and microstructures such as flame perthite, myrmekite, deformation twins, and textures associated with grain-boundary migration recrystallization in the granite. In the metamorphic aureole, biotite porphyroblasts overgrow S3, the earliest Acadian secondary foliation, and were deformed during S4 crenulation cleavage development. The KMP intruded at 377±5.2 Ma based on a U-Th-total Pb monazite crystallization age, which is concordant with the published age of the nearby Barre granite. The timing of S4 foliation development in the CVGT is constrained locally by 40Ar/39Ar geochronology at ~365 Ma, consistent with the microstructurally-inferred relative-age relationships. Plateau/weighted mean 40Ar/39Ar ages from across the transect and minimum ages from argon-loss profiles show a general trend of younging towards the east, suggesting these rocks have been affected by Alleghanian and Mesozoic deformation and exhumation.

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