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  • About
  • The Global ETD Search service is a free service for researchers to find electronic theses and dissertations. This service is provided by the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations.
    Our metadata is collected from universities around the world. If you manage a university/consortium/country archive and want to be added, details can be found on the NDLTD website.
11

The value of measuring brand equity: the Ceres Fruit Juices case

Khumalo, Wilson Mdala January 2009 (has links)
Measuring brand equity is an important brand management function but, the appropriateness of brand equity measurement methods remain a concern. This study applied levels three of brand equity measurement approach to have an understanding of consumers’ brand perception. It is hoped that this understanding could give brand managers the necessary tool to develop and deploy effective and efficient brand management strategies and tactics. At Ceres Fruit Juices (CFJ), brand equity is used to improve competitive marketing actions, gain larger margins, intermediary co-operation and management support for brand extension. This study measures CFJ Brand equity to understand consumers’ perception so that this understanding can be used to develop responsive brand management strategies and tactics. Brand equity measurement methods and model found in the literature shows that measurement success depends on the suitability of the method used. However, customers’ perception is at the centre of brand equity measurement approach – level three used in this study. With merger and acquisition taking place at Ceres Fruit Juices, brand equity measurement emerged as an important brand management function to leverage real brand value. This would inevitably lead to an improvement in customer service through adequate understanding of customers brand perception. Understanding gives brand managers the necessary tool to deploy responsive and efficient brand management strategies and tactics to lessen the severity of the negative impact merger and acquisition may have on brand equity. Thus, this study found measurement model and method to be an essential element of brand equity measurement.
12

Business use of branding strategies for e-commerce benefits

Onojaefe, Darlington Peter January 2008 (has links)
Thesis submitted in fulfilment of the requirements for the degree Doctor of Technology: Marketing in the Faculty of Business at the Cape Peninsula University of Technology, 2008 / This thesis identifies and examines evidence of e-commerce in three large businesses (Woolworths, Momentum and Santam) focusing on their Internet branding strategies, the impact of management actions and how those actions contribute to e-commerce success. Case study was used to assemble evidence from the three companies. The data received from respondents were transcribed, codified into thirteen key words. These were analysed using Cohen Kappa method of content analysis. The findings show different impact of management actions and prioritisation of management functions are evident at different stages of the adoption process. In addition, the application of management function differs at different stages suggesting expected changes in management competency as the adoption process matures. This thesis argues that as we move to a more interactive mode of working with customers and competitors using Internet technology, the role of marketing is critical; within marketing, brand management is seen as a particularly important activity. The work reported is based on the evidence that brand management is indeed important, and a maturity model is presented to guide brand management activities at different stages of e-commerce adoption. Internet-related partnering opportunities with large firms remain a concern for smaller firms. It reveals that although much Internet research has taken a technical viewpoint, some experts have begun to make connections between Internet success and brand management. This thesis shows that there are opportunities for businesses doing e-commerce but, sufficient attention should be given to the implementation of branding and brand management strategies that recognise the changes and challenges of e-commerce adoption. It also shows that the patterns of management activities and actions that will ensure success are much clearer, as well as the partnering opportunities with small businesses.
13

Effect of branding management on technology performance : a case study

Langa, Makhosazana P. 05 June 2012 (has links)
M.Ing. / This dissertation aims to identify the effects contributed by branding on organisational performance, as branding may contribute positively or negatively to the company sales performance. Many customers align quality products with certain brands only. Some organisations over price their products because they have guaranteed space in the market and had built solid relationships with their customers. Due to many different good products which do not do well in the market because of poor branding, the author identifies the problems aligned with branding and the author also looks at the possible causes of poor sales performance. This dissertation aims at presenting knowledge on branding, marketing strategies used by organisations to secure space for themselves in the market and strategies used by organisations to persuade customers into thinking their brand has the best products. The author provides overview on branding importance, criteria for choosing brand elements and brand tactics that has an impact on the customer‟s psychological aspects. The author then talks about the marketing strategies that can be used after building proper branding for the organisation. The marketing strategies may differ from organisation to organisation depending on the target market. The author then analyzes customer needs and buying behaviour and channels of distribution of products to ensure maximum sales. A case study in two television (TV) famous brands was conducted in order to find out the impact of branding on organisational performance. This case study compares the two TVs with each other and investigates their technologies. The case study also looks at TVs branding, their marketing strategies and the overview of their marketing results. A survey questionnaire was constructed, and this survey questionnaire was on the two TV brands discussed in the case study. The survey questionnaire was sent to different people of different life styles and age groups. The aim of the questionnaire was to find the extent into which branding influences customer‟s decision in buying a product, other things that attracts a customer and also how do customers perceive different brands.
14

Internal branding as a tool for organisational alignment.

Scheffer, Julia 28 May 2008 (has links)
Due to the increasing competitiveness between organisations to attract and retain internal and external stakeholders so as to increase organisational competitive advantage, it is vitally important to the long-term success thereof that the inherent importance of organisational communication, specifically internal communication, is taken into consideration within the context of a rapidly changing business environment. This is to make sure that an alignment exists between internal organisational core values and the external image the organisation portrays. Thus within the context of banking service organisations so as to ensure a successful internal organisational alignment strategy, which promotes employee satisfaction and participation, improvement needs to be made to internal communication strategies. Based on this, three key concepts are identified as pertinent; namely internal organisational communication, the corporate identity aspect of internal branding and the organisational culture aspect of organisational alignment. Thus, the overriding purpose is to determine what the role of internal branding as a tool for internal organisational alignment is amongst banking service organisations in South Africa that have undergone an amalgamation. The motivation for this research is the fact that numerous organisations do not realise the importance of internal communication and branding initiatives to the internal stakeholders’ satisfaction, service delivery quality and ultimate impact on the organisation’s profitability. Absa Bank is the subject for the one-shot case study as it recently implemented new internal branding initiatives so as to engage and align internal stakeholders with the core organisational values and culture, to improve the quality of service rendered, to retain external customers, and to impact positively on the bank’s profitability. Through the use of qualitative research methods, which are a one-shot case study utilising a documentation study and telephonic and e-mail interviews, the goal of the study is achieved. The theoretical chapters set the context by introducing and defining relevant key concepts, as well as presenting a theoretical discussion on these concepts. The case study on Absa Bank forms the basis of the integration of theoretical concepts and the practical application thereof. Finally, the research findings are discussed and further recommendations proposed. Based on the research, a key contribution is the conceptualisation of the term integrated organisational communication. Keywords: organisational communication, internal organisational communication, corporate identity, internal branding, organisational culture, organisational alignment. / Andrea Crystal
15

Trademark and brand dilution : an empirical investigation

Kruger, Hannelie 04 1900 (has links)
Thesis (PhD)--Stellenbosch University, 2014. / ENGLISH ABSTRACT: The Constitutional Court in the Republic of South African indicated in 2006 (Laugh It Off Promotions CC v SAB International (Finance) BV t/a Sabmark International (Freedom of Expression Institute as amicus curiae), 2006 (1) SA 144 (CC)) that a senior trademark cannot be provided with anti-dilution protection if the senior trademark cannot demonstrate a probability of substantial economic harm. In the United States of America, legislation (Trademark Dilution Revision Act of 2006) corrected an earlier Supreme Court decision (Moseley v Victoria's Secret Catalogue, Inc., 537 U.S. 418 (2003)), and as a result evidence of a probability of dilution is now required to provide a senior trademark with anti-dilution protection. Senior trademarks experienced mixed success in courts in the Republic of South Africa as well as the United States of America when requesting anti-dilution protection. The reason is that when empirical evidence is offered of trademark dilution the nature of the evidence is usually limited and the method of obtaining it is often flawed. The response of brand managers to trademark infringement also seems to be limited to decisions contemplating litigation. Therefore, to assist both the legal and marketing fraternity when trademark infringement is thought to occur, this study investigates the nature and extent of trademark dilution. A literature review revealed the elements and forms (tarnishing and blurring) of trademark dilution and the motivation for using the concept ‘brand’ and the construct ‘brand equity’ to conceptualise trademark value. The limitations of previous research in measuring trademark dilution and commentary on court decisions provided the basis of the conceptualisation of trademark dilution as an undesirable effect on customer-based brand equity, operationalised as brand attitude. Brand attitude is a higher level brand value creator and five sub-components (affect, cognition, attitude valence and stability, attitude accessibility, purchase intention) were identified that measures brand attitude accurately. Brand attitude is also preceded by brand familiarity and leads to brand loyalty. Furthermore, brand attitudes can also be explained according to four types of decision-making processes: the type of decisions (high and low involvement) and type of motivations (informational and transformational). The purpose of this study was to investigate the nature and extent of trademark dilution, (tarnishing and blurring) on components of customer-based brand equity. The study used an experimental research strategy and an electronic survey instrument (Qualtrics) with self-administered questionnaires. Six hypotheses were formulated to assess whether trademark tarnishing and blurring had an effect on any component of customer-based brand equity when trademarks/brands were considered collectively and individually. The study was designed as a 3 x 2 x 2 factorial experiment. It consisted of three factors (type of dilution; type of decision; type of motivation) with different levels (undiluted/tarnish/blur; high involvement/low involvement; informational/transformational). Twelve different questionnaires were administered to a convenience sample of 3 441 potential respondents. The data generated by the 12 questionnaires was analysed using ANOVA and Mann-Whitney U tests. The results suggested that trademark tarnishing did have statistically significant effects on components of customer-brand equity as far all trademarks/brands were concerned and that the effect of trademark tarnishing and blurring were different when all trademarks/brands were considered together. Tarnishing and blurring had statistically significant effects on components of customer-based brand equity when individual trademarks/brands were considered, but the effect seemed to be specific to the type of decision (high/low involvement) taken and not the type of motivation (informational/transformational) involved. Tarnishing and blurring, when compared, had different and similar, but varying in intensity, effects on components of customer-based brand equity for individual trademarks/brands. Tarnishing and blurring, when considered separately, had different and similar, but varying in intensity, effects on components of customer-based brand equity. The study made a theoretical contribution which should be of value to members of the legal and marketing fraternity. The study showed in the first instance that trademark tarnishing and blurring are independent constructs that had different or similar, but varying in intensity, effects on components of customer-based brand equity. The effect of trademark dilution, tarnishing and blurring, is not limited to brand recall and recognition and brand attitude accessibility. Trademark tarnishing also had different or similar, but varying in strength, effects on individual trademarks/brands, as did trademark blurring. The type of decision (high or low) and type of motivation (informational or transformational) therefore play a role in the unique effect trademark tarnishing or blurring will have on components of customer-based brand equity. Secondly, the effect of trademark tarnishing and blurring may not be unfavourable by implication. In fact, blurring had a positive effect on components of customer-based brand equity, at least after a single exposure. This finding implies that trademark tarnishing has a more severe and faster effect on customer-based brand equity compared to trademark blurring. A brand manager will, as a result of the study, know how to respond, if at all, when a junior mark emerges that is similar to their senior trademark and seemingly dilutes the senior trademark. An attorney whose client requests anti-dilution protection will know, as a result of the study, whether litigation is indeed the answer to the problem. The study provides insight, not only regarding the nature of trademark dilution, as explained by the impact of trademark tarnishing and blurring on specific components of customer-based brand equity, but also regarding the extent of trademark dilution. Trademark dilution has an effect on trademarks/brands, but the effect, be it in respect of a specific component or the intensity of the effect on the component, may not be what is expected. Based on the results of this study several recommendations can be offered to brand managers and trademark attorneys. Brand managers (senior trademarks) should not respond to junior marks using their brands (senior trademarks) without first assessing the nature and extent of the effect of the junior mark on the senior trademark’s customer-based brand equity. Similarly, attorneys should also first examine the nature and extent of trademark dilution and advise their clients accordingly. Once the nature and extent of trademark dilution have been determined, a brand manager can customise his response according to the component of customer-based brand equity affected as well as the intensity of the effect. Attorneys can support at least part of their arguments to obtain anti-dilution protection for their clients, on very exact indications of the effect of use by a junior mark on customer-based brand equity. / AFRIKAANSE OPSOMMING: Die Konstitusionele Hof van die Republiek van Suid-Afrika het in 2006 (“Laugh it Off Promotions CC vs SAB International (Finance) BV t/a Sabmark International (Freedom of Expression Institute as amicus curiae),” 2006 (1) SA 144 (CC)) bevind dat ‘n senior handelsmerk nie anti-skendingsbeskerming kan geniet tensy die senior handelsmerk ‘n waarskynlikheid van wesenlike finansiële skade kan demonstreer nie. In die Verenigde State van Amerika het wetgewing ‘n Hooggeregshof-uitspraak (“Moseley v Victoria’s Secret Catalogue, Inc.,” 537 U.S. 418 (2003)) gekorrigeer sodat sederdien slegs bewys van ‘n waarskynlikheid van skending nou benodig word vir ‘n senior handelsmerk om anti-skendingsbeskerming te kan geniet. Senior handelsmerke het gemengde welslae in beide die Republiek van Suid-Afrika sowel as die Verenigde State van Amerika behaal wanneer hulle anti-skendingsbeskerming versoek het omrede die empiriese bewyse wat normaalweg aangebied is, beperkend van aard was en die data-insamelingsmetode gebrekkig. Die reaksie van handelsmerkbestuurders op handelsmerk-oortreding was tot dusver beperk tot besluite ten gunste van litigasie al dan nie. Derhalwe ondersoek hierdie studie die aard en omvang van handelsmerk-skending om sodoende beide die regskundige en bemarkingsgemeenskappe te ondersteun wanneer handelsmerk-oortreding vermoed word. ‘n Literatuur oorsig het die elemente en vorme (besmetting en verdowwing) van handelsmerk-skending geidentifiseer asook die motivering om die konsep van ‘handelsmerk’ en die konstruk van ‘handelsmerkwaarde’ te gebruik. Die beperkings van vorige navorsing om handelsmerk-skending te meet en kommentaar op hofbeslissings het die basis van die voorstelling van handelsmerk-skending as ‘n ongewenste effek op kliënt-gebaseerde handelsmerkwaarde neergelê en dit geoperasionaliseer as handelsmerk-ingesteldheid. Handelsmerk-ingesteldheid is ‘n hoë-vlak handelsmerkwaardeskepper en vyf subkomponente (gevoelsinhoud/emosie; denke/kennis; polariteit en stabiliteit van ingesteldheid; ingesteldheidstoeganklikheid/reaksie latentheid; aankoopvoorneme) is geïdentifiseer wat handelsmerk-ingesteldheid akkuraat meet. Handelsmerk-ingesteldheid word voorafgegaan deur handelsmerk-bekendheid en gevolg deur handelsmerk-lojaliteit. Verder kan handelsmerk-ingesteldheid ook verklaar word aan die hand van vier soorte besluitnemingsprosesse: die tipe besluit (hoë betrokkenheid of lae betrokkenheid) en die tipe motivering (informatief of transformerend). Die doel van die studie was om die aard en omvang van handelsmerk-skending, (besmetting en verdowwing) op die komponente van kliënt-gebaseerde handelsmerkwaarde te ondersoek. Die studie het ‘n eksperimentele navorsingstrategie gevolg en van ‘n elektroniese opname-instrument (Qualtrics) met self-geadministreerde vraelyste gebruik gemaak. Ses hipoteses is geformuleer om vas te stel of besmetting of verdowwing ‘n effek op enige komponent van kliënt-gebaseerde handelsmerkwaarde het wanneer alle handelsmerke gesamentlik beskou word sowel as afsonderlik. Die studie was ontwerp as ‘n 3 x 2 x 2 faktoriale eksperiment. Dit het bestaan uit drie faktore (tipe skending; tipe besluit; tipe motivering) met verskillende vlakke (onbenadeel/besmet/verdof; hoë betrokkenheid/lae betrokkenheid; informatief/transformerend). Twaalf verskillende vraelyste is aan ‘n geriefsteekproef van 3 441 moontlike respondente gestuur. Die data word deur die 12 vraelyste gegenereer is met behulp van ANOVA en Mann Whitney U toetse ontleed. Die resultate het aangetoon dat besmetting ‘n statisties betekenisvolle effek op die komponente van kliënt-gebaseerde handelsmerkwaarde het wanneer die handelsmerke gesamentlik beskou word, asook dat die effek van besmetting en verdowwing verskillend is wanneer al die handelsmerke gesamentlik beskou word. Bemetting en verdowwing het statisties betekenisvolle effekte op die komponente van handelsmerkwaarde wanneer handelsmerke afsonderlik beskou word, maar die effek blyk verwant aan die tipe besluit (hoë betrokkenheid/lae betrokkenheid) te wees en nie aan die tipe motivering (informatief/transformerend) nie. Besmetting en verdowwing, wanneer dit vergelyk word, het verskillende of soortgelyke, maar veranderend invloede ten opsigte van intensiteit, effekte op die komponente van kliënt-gebaseerde handelsmerkwaarde. Die studie lewer ‘n teoretiese bydrae gelewer aan lede van die regskundige-en bemarkingsgemeenskappe. Die studie het ten eerste getoon dat handelsmerk-besmetting en –verdowwing onafhanklike konstrukte is wat verskillende of soortgelyke, maar veranderend in intensiteit, effekte op kliënt-gebaseerde handelsmerkwaarde het. Die effek van handelsmerk-skending, besmetting en verdowwing, is nie net beperk tot handelsmerk-herroeping en -herkenning en handelsmerk-ingesteldheidstoeganklikheid nie. Handelsmerk-besmetting het ook verskillende of soortgelyke, maar verskillend in intensiteit, effekte op die handelsmerke afsonderlik, wat ook geld in handelsmerk-verdowwing. Die tipe besluit (hoë betrokkenheid of lae betrokkenheid) en tipe motivering (informatief of transformerend) speel derhalwe ‘n rol in die unieke effek wat besmetting of verdowwing op die komponente van kliënt-gebaseerde handelsmerkwaarde het. Tweedens is die effek van besmetting en verdowwing nie noodwendig ongunstig nie. Trouens, verdowwing het ‘n versterkende effek op sommige komponente van kliënt-gebaseerde handelsmerkwaarde gehad, ten minste ná ‘n enkele blootstelling. Dit impliseer dat besmetting ‘n veel erger en vinniger effek op kliënt-gebaseerde handelsmerkwaarde as verdowwing het. ‘n Handelsmerkbestuurder sal na aanleiding van die studie weet hoe om te reageer, indien enigsins, wanneer ‘n junior merk verskyn wat soortgelyk aan die senior handelsmerk is. ‘n Prokureur wie se kliënt anti-skendingsbeskerming versoek sal weet, na aanleiding van die studie, of litigasie inderdaad die antwoord op die probleem is. Die studie verskaf insig, nie net ten opsigte van die aard van handelsmerkskending soos beskryf deur die impak van handelsmerkbesmetting en –verdowwing op sekere komponente van kliënt-gebaseerde handelsmerkwaarde nie, maar ook ten opsigte van die omvang van handelsmerkskending. Handelsmerkskending het ‘n effek op handelsmerke, maar die effek, of dit op ‘n sekere komponent of op die intensiteit van die effek op die kompenent mag wees, is moontlik anders as wat verwag is. Gabaseer op die resultate kan verskeie aanbevelings aan handelsmerkbestuurders en handelsmerkprokureurs gemaak word. Handelsmerkbestuurders (senior handelsmerke) behoort nie te reageer op junior merke wat hul merk (senior handelsmerk) gebruik sonder om die aard en omvang van die effek van die junior merk op die senior handelsmerk se kliënt-gebaseerde handelsmerkwaarde te bepaal nie. Eweneens behoort handelsmerkprokureurs eers die aard en omvang van die handelsmerkskending te bepaal en hul kliënte dienooreenkomstig adviseer. Sodra die aard en omvang van handelsmerkskending bepaal is, kan ‘n handelsmerkbestuurder sy reaksie volgens die geaffekteerde komponent van die handelsmerk, sowel as die intensiteit daarvan, aanpas. Prokureurs kan ten minste sommige van hul argumente om anti-skendingsbeskerming vir hul kliënte te verkry, ondersteun deur baie duidelike aanduidings van die effek van die gebruik van ‘n junior merk op kliënt-gebaseerde handelsmerkwaarde.
16

Retail brand management : towards modelling the grocery retailer brand from an ethnographic perspective

El-Amir, Ayman M. Ragaa January 2004 (has links)
As producers of national and international brands, manufacturers and service providers were the focus of brand management literature. However, as retailers have become major players nationally and internationally, managing retailers as brands have become a major challenge. The retailer unique business nature, and managerial needs as well as its ever-changing business environment render managing the retail brand a unique and complex task. For the retail brand to embrace and adapt to its managerial challenges, a multitude of brand management approaches should be employed. However, when addressing retailers as brands, the retail management literature has failed to account for this multiplicity exposing a gap in the literature. To fill this gap, a communal retail brand management model is proposed to help retailers embrace and adapt to their various branding requirements inflicted by their business challenges. To build the model, a common core among the various approaches involved in managing retail brands should be identified so as to simplify, by forming a unified approach, yet maintain the essence of each approach. The holistic, humanitarian and managerial orientations of the concept of organizational culture identify it as the common core and thus act as the backbone on which the model will be built. Since the model will be built through cultural interpretation, the ethnographic tradition of qualitative inquiry is utilized because it provides an emic perspective, which is the best strategy (that consequently provides best tools) for interpreting cultures. Besides, the flexibility of the ethnographic tradition allows the adoption of other qualitative traditions of enquiry to aid in building the model. Thus, the case study tradition is employed to confine the study within the precincts of a single retail brand in order to conduct deep analysis for several stakeholders simultaneously. Additionally, the analytical technique of the grounded theory tradition is employed to capitalize on its systematic ability to form conceptual themes out of raw data that, ultimately, become the model's building blocks. In light of conducting a five-months participant observation study in two grocery stores of a leading supermarket brand in two countries (Sainsbury's stores in the UK and Egypt), the findings revealed that modelling the retail brand culture resembles, metaphorically, a tree. The culture symbols resemble the tree attractive leaves, the rituals & local heroes resemble the supportive trunk, and values resemble the roots that anchor in the soil, which, in turn, resembles the cultures in which the retailer operates. The thesis concludes that the Tree- Model is a road map that guides retailers to build and manage their brand identity and consequently enable them to embrace and adapt to the various branding requirements dictated by their business challenges.
17

A model for branding practices in a new South African Higher Education landscape

Van Gensen, Garth Allister 2005 October 1900 (has links)
Thesis (D. Tech.) - Central University of Technology, Free State, 2005 / Distinctive challenges are currently facing South African higher education institutions. Among others they are funding; quality assurance; globalisation; the emergence of private higher education; the idea of an entrepreneurial university as an alternative; enrolment capping; as well as merged and incorporated institutions. It is critical that these challenges be addressed urgently. However, the lack of proper marketing and branding strategies at institutions of higher learning in view of the new unfolding national and international landscape, leaves much to be desired. In the past, branding of higher education in South Africa was not an area of priority, because higher education operated in a protected, regulated market with a steady income. The current higher education scenario necessitates higher education institutions to revisit their branding strategies as a means to grapple with the distinctive challenges facing them with the purpose of enhancing quality; delivering graduates to the world of work; as well as being relevant by being responsive to society and the economic needs of the country in order to adhere to the outcomes of the National Plan for Higher Education (NPHE) (RSA DoE 2001). A thorough literature study involving current and relevant literature on branding and branding practices was undertaken, after which a mainly qualitative research approach was followed. Focus group interviews at two entrepreneurial universities abroad; informal conversation interviews at seven South African higher education institutions; as well as a case study were conducted. Participant observation in the workplace relating to branding and branding practices also took place. The constant comparative method of data analysis was used to capture recurring patterns and themes during the research process. What became evident from the literature was that branding strategies of higher education institutions are generally restricted to informing and visual identity. The results of a survey done in 2004 by UNITECH, a body representing marketing and communication units of universities and former technikons (currently Universities of Technology) in South Africa, was also quite significant for this study. The following deductions regarding marketing and communication practices at South African higher education institutions could be made from this survey: There is a lack of an integrated marketing approach; executive management lacks understanding of branding practices; there is a lack of strategy with regard to marketing and branding; as well as a lack of internal communication. These deductions were consistent with the researcher’s own observations and are also confirmed by the informal conversation interviews held at the seven South African higher education institutions as part of the empirical investigation. The case study to highlight the branding practices of a higher education institution in the central region revealed that the implementation phase focused strongly on external/outward exercises, and that the internalisation aspects of their branding were narrowed to information only. The new visual identity of the institution was emphasised, whilst the internal processes remained the same as always. The aforementioned aspects are an indication that South African higher education institutions need to re-visit their internal practices. A market orientation mindset is of crucial importance for higher education institutions in South Africa to move towards an entrepreneurial mindset. The Universities of Warwick (England) and Twente (the Netherlands) were selected for this study as a result of the astounding successes they have achieved with their entrepreneurial activities. According to the respondents from both universities, the following aspects – among others - are extremely important for their successes: visionary leadership; an integrated entrepreneurial culture; a focus on external as well as internal communication; and relevance. The primary purpose of this study was to develop a model for South African higher education institutions which would ultimately result in brand enhancement of institutions that would be perceived as relevant and society-minded to live up to the challenges of the new and changing landscape in South Africa. The proposed model in this study is based on two overarching fundamentals, namely the experience economy and its relatedness to brand, as well as relevance and branding, which should be an integrated approach that could ultimately lead to successful external branding.
18

Brand alignment : developing a model for competitive advantage through a study of selected South African companies

McCoy, Sean Patrick 04 1900 (has links)
The role of brand has evolved to take on a broader application as a post-modern management concept and has attracted increasing attention in the 21st century as a key component for the development of competitive advantage. Far removed from its origins as an identity device, branding now transcends the pure marketing interpretation and is increasingly seen as a catalyst for corporate strategy and a tool for holistic reputation management and business performance. This thesis evaluates the extent to which brand is being adopted as a mechanism to align with corporate strategy, internal culture and supporting behaviours and external delivery or organisational performance: in essence, the concept of a brand-driven organisation that deploys brand as a core capability in pursuit of competitive advantage. This evaluation takes into account defined South African perspectives and examples in a case research approach. It seeks to evaluate how the brand alignment methodology can advance current theory and be applied as a management practice. The research argues that brand extends beyond the marketing function or the end-point of organisational systems and delivery. Rather, it suggests that brand becomes integrated as one of the primary elements of corporate strategy and seeks to embrace strategic organisational intent, internal culture and external manifestation of the business vision and results. The organisational architecture model is adapted to suit this research and offer a brand alignment framework that facilitates the effective and efficient implementation and realisation of strategic intent. This links brand alignment to resource-based theory and posits that it is considered as a core capability within the firm, enabling the attainment of competitive advantage. iv This thesis concludes that brand is not confined to an aspect of marketing, but should be deployed holistically in the organisation as a core capability and opportunity for competitive advantage. The research demonstrates an emerging body of thought and advances theory and practice in this area of business, both academically and in a professional management context, offering possibilities for continued further research in this field of management. / Business Management / D.B. L.
19

Brand alignment : developing a model for competitive advantage through a study of selected South African companies

McCoy, Sean Patrick 04 1900 (has links)
The role of brand has evolved to take on a broader application as a post-modern management concept and has attracted increasing attention in the 21st century as a key component for the development of competitive advantage. Far removed from its origins as an identity device, branding now transcends the pure marketing interpretation and is increasingly seen as a catalyst for corporate strategy and a tool for holistic reputation management and business performance. This thesis evaluates the extent to which brand is being adopted as a mechanism to align with corporate strategy, internal culture and supporting behaviours and external delivery or organisational performance: in essence, the concept of a brand-driven organisation that deploys brand as a core capability in pursuit of competitive advantage. This evaluation takes into account defined South African perspectives and examples in a case research approach. It seeks to evaluate how the brand alignment methodology can advance current theory and be applied as a management practice. The research argues that brand extends beyond the marketing function or the end-point of organisational systems and delivery. Rather, it suggests that brand becomes integrated as one of the primary elements of corporate strategy and seeks to embrace strategic organisational intent, internal culture and external manifestation of the business vision and results. The organisational architecture model is adapted to suit this research and offer a brand alignment framework that facilitates the effective and efficient implementation and realisation of strategic intent. This links brand alignment to resource-based theory and posits that it is considered as a core capability within the firm, enabling the attainment of competitive advantage. iv This thesis concludes that brand is not confined to an aspect of marketing, but should be deployed holistically in the organisation as a core capability and opportunity for competitive advantage. The research demonstrates an emerging body of thought and advances theory and practice in this area of business, both academically and in a professional management context, offering possibilities for continued further research in this field of management. / Business Management / D.B. L.
20

Factors affecting store brand purchase in the Greek grocery market

Sarantidis, Paraskevi January 2012 (has links)
This study is an in-depth investigation of the factors that affect store brand purchases. It aims to help both retailers and manufacturers predict store brand purchases through an improved understanding of the effects of three latent variables: customer satisfaction and loyalty with the store; which is expressed through word-of-mouth; and trust in store brands. An additional aim is to explore variations in the level of store brand adoption and the inter-relationships between the selected constructs. Data was collected through a telephone survey of those responsible for household grocery shopping, and who shop at the nine leading grocery retailers in Greece. A total of 904 respondents completed the questionnaire based upon a quota of 100 respondents for each of the nine retailers. Data were analyzed through chi-square, analysis of variance and partial least square. The proposed model was tested by partial least square path modeling, which related the latent variables to the dependent manifest variable: store brand purchases. The findings provide empirical support that store brand purchases are positively influenced by the consumers’ perceived level of trust in store brands. The consumer decision-making process for store brands is complex and establishing customer satisfaction and loyalty with the store does not appear to influence store brand purchases or the level of trust in the retailer’s store brands in the specific context under study. Consequently the most appropriate way to influence store brand purchases in the Greek market is through increasing in the level of trust in the retailer’s store brands. It is suggested that retailers should therefore invest in trust building strategies for their own store brands and try to capitalize on their brand equity by using a family brand policy. Theoretical and managerial implications of the findings are discussed and opportunities for further research are suggested.

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