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  • About
  • The Global ETD Search service is a free service for researchers to find electronic theses and dissertations. This service is provided by the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations.
    Our metadata is collected from universities around the world. If you manage a university/consortium/country archive and want to be added, details can be found on the NDLTD website.
1

Discourses of violent crime in South Africa : constructing crime, criminals and victims.

James, Monique. January 2010 (has links)
Talk of violent crime in South Africa abounds, with criminal violence as a topic of discussion on many social platforms - from the President‟s State of the Nation address to conversations between people on the street. This study aims to explore the discourses that South Africans use in their accounts of violent crime, what presentation of violent crime is constructed through the use of these discourses, and the effects of such constructions. Using Wetherell and Potter‟s (1992) approach to discourse analysis, the transcripts from in-depth, semi-structured interviews with fifteen participants were analysed to identify and examine the discourses that participants drew on to construct an account of violent crime. Seven central themes were identified in the transcripts. These pertained to the causes of violent crime, the effects of violent crime, prevention and deterrence, victims, responsibility, perpetrators and categorisation of „good‟ and „bad‟ criminals. In the study each of the themes is examined in turn to explore the discourses that are drawn on in the construction of each theme and the presentation of violent crime that is constructed through the use of these discourses. Analysis of the discourses shows that the construction of crime, criminals and victims is complex and that this is often done in such a way as to manage the threat of violent crime. It also shows that race „colours‟ the way we see, understand and construct violent crime. Yet this is not only about the identification of others as particular kinds of people but also about self-identifying, as people actively construct their own identity when constructing violent crime. The way in which we construct violent crime therefore has important implications for the way in which we experience others as well as ourselves. It also has important implications for the interventions that are used and proposed for managing violent crime. An understanding of these discourses and constructions of violent crime will allow us to more effectively evaluate the assumptions on which these interventions are based and thus improve the interventions themselves. / Thesis (M.Soc.Sci.)-Univesity of KwaZulu-Natal, Durban, 2010.
2

Ways in which teacher discourses, namely, praising and scolding contribute to the construction of gender identities of learners.

Hadebe, Sibongele Elizabeth. January 2009 (has links)
Abstract not available. / Thesis (M.A.) - University of KwaZulu-Natal, Durban, 2009.
3

Cohesion as a bonding tool in translation of English into Northern Sotho : an interaction between translation and discourse analysis

Kgatla, Mohale Edward January 2012 (has links)
Thesis (M.A. (Translation Studies and Linguistics )) -- University of Limpopo, 2012 / Refer to the document
4

A discourse analysis of the racial talk and identity construction of a group of working class Afrikaans-speakers

Binnell, Brynn 05 August 2016 (has links)
A research report submitted to the Faculty of Arts, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the Degree of Master of Arts in the F'ield of Psychology by Course Work arid Research Report: 1996 ..7 Johannesburg, 1997 / This research project set out to explore the racial identities of a selected group of South African whites who were Afrikaans-speaking, Unstructured, in-depth interview techniques were employed, in which the conversations with the participnnts were recorded and transcribed, These transcripts were then subjected tr) a discourse analysis, whereby any possible effeci s and functions of the talk were examined, A number of theoretical approaches informed this task. These included Foucault's concept of discourse and his account of the functioning of disciplinary power in modern societies. Adorno and Horkheimer's ideas 011 prejudice and racism were also found to be of t;!C,lt relevance to this research, as well i1S Altlmsser's formulation of the concept of ideology, ideological state apparatuses, incerpellation and subject positioning. The relationship between psychic and social structures was also explored in the light of Adorno and Horkhelmer's fermulation of prejudice M ,\ defence mechanism. Within this broad framework, it was shown that aside from its overt content, racise talk could be described as having important ideological effects. These included normalisation. legitimation and j\lstificatioll of the existing unequal relations ill. society. The discourse analytic striitcgy facilitated an ,111;11Y5is of the conditions under which the participants were constructed .\S subjects, and the manner In which the terms they used (such I\S race, culture and nation) were imbricated with broader discursive and ideological formations, The influence of social class, gender and uge variables in the interview settings were also evaluated.
5

The analysis of the impact of nonverbal communication Xitsonga discourse

Sibuyi, Eliot Masezi January 2011 (has links)
Thesis (M.A. (Linguistics)) --University of Limpopo, 2011 / Xitsonga is one of the eleven official languages in South Africa. It is spoken mainly in three provinces, Gauteng, Limpopo and Mpumalanga, while English is a global language. Whenever two languages meet, challenges are evident in terms of communication. The study aim to analyse the impact of nonverbal communication in both English and Xitsonga cultures. Nonverbal communication accounts for 60 to 70 per cent of what people communicate. Furthermore, the study deals with the role of nonverbal communication as it shapes the perceptions of both the receivers and communicators’ personality. Categories of nonverbal communication have been investigated by exploring different intercultural dimensions which include nonverbal immediacy and non-immediacy behaviours, power, authority and status, power distance, responsiveness, high-context and low-context communication, individualistic or collectivistic cultures. In addition, the study explores facial expressions which, among others, include expression of emotions; the types of emotions; paralanguage; and factors that influence facial expressions; cultural display rules, eye contact and gaze. Also, the study gives attention to Facial paralanguage and facial reflexes. It has been discovered in the study that although English and Xitsonga cultures are related in some nonverbal communication aspects, there are other aspects that are culturally bound. The latter aspects require a serious scrutiny lest miscommunication and misinterpretation occur. In other words, culture cannot be taken for granted when it comes to nonverbal communication cues. Cultural display rules dictate responsiveness, attitudes, and perspectives of communicators’ perceptions.
6

Public discourses on choice of termination of pregnancy in a rural area of the Eastern Cape Province in South Africa

Sigcau, Nomakhosi January 2009 (has links)
A period of ten years has elapsed since the Choice on Termination of Pregnancy Act came into effect. Little has been done in South Africa to investigate public discourses concerning termination of pregnancy since the implementation of the Act. The social context and the quality of available support systems determine the outcome of the women’s feelings after the abortion. Knowledge about the social context is important, as it will help to understand the complexities and nuances of abortion. The aim of the research is to explore public discourses on Choice on Termination of Pregnancy (CTOP), and the potential implications of these discourses on the use of the CTOP service. The sample consisted of 23 black isiXhosa-speaking participants from the rural area of the Eastern Cape Province in South Africa. Four focus groups coming from different age groups (between the ages 18 and 52) with both men and women participated in the study. Fictitious vignettes that tap into two different scenarios regarding abortion based on women’s stories were used. Discourses that emerged from people’s text are explained, described and interpreted through a discourse analysis. Since the study was interested in public discourses it led to the discovery of 17 interpretative repertoires as follows: social stigma, abortion equated to murder, degradation of society, pregnancy as an irresponsible act, conditional acceptance, TOP in the context of marriage, future potentiality invested in the foetus, dehumanizing foetus into a clot, shared decision making responsibility, gender dynamics interpretative repertoire, negative post abortion consequences, the scolding versus the supportive nurse interpretative repertoire, alternatives interpretative repertoire, rights versus no responsibility interpretative repertoire, more knowledge needed, male and female or generational differentiation repertoire, and the positive effects repertoire. Abortion is opposed on religious and cultural grounds. TOP has been legalized in South Africa but with this a debate and conflicting views have arisen. These variations in people’s discourses may limit access to TOP for women who need the service.
7

The invisible who will not disappear : a discourse analysis of South African writings on street children

Levy-Seedat, Alicia Vincenti Nerine 06 1900 (has links)
Street children are present in every metropolitan city around the world. Their presence has provoked varied responses from academics, the media and others. However, despite the proliferation of responses, current solutions are not always commensurate with the resources expended in this area. Are current responses a part of the problem or a part of the solution? Following the precedence established by other researchers and calls for greater reflexivity, this study attempts to provide a critical analysis of selected South African writings on and about street children. Particular focus is accorded to how selected academic and popular writings construct street children. The specific aim is to facilitate an examination of the underlying discourses that inform South African writings on street children. The role that academic and popular writings fulfil in selectively maintaining the status quo over which their authors sometimes voice disapproval is also examined. Wherever possible the origins of such discourses and the powers that maintain them are referred to. The extent to which the discourses evident in writings on South African street children converge with the dominant discourses present in developmental psychology as a whole are reviewed. The complimentary techniques of transformative inquiry and discourse analysis are at the heart of the methodology in this study. As an analytical tool discourse analysis is used to deepen current understanding of perceptions of street children. Discourse analysis helps to chart the underlying discourses drawn on in texts and shows how writings have influenced, intentionally or otherwise, the perceptions of subjects of research. Transformative enquiry as a significant · complimentary, albeit implicit, feature of discourse analysis enables a reflection on the research process itself. Four main discourses are discussed, each of which is centred around several sub-discourses. The first discourse, "He who pays the piper calls the tune" involves an objectification of street children, conveying negative' images of street children. The second discourse, "St. Jude the Patron Saint of Lost Causes" is rooted in the ideas of hopelessness, helplessness, victimology and ubiquitousness. The third discourse, "natured versus nurtured" is located in ideas of biological determinism within which street children are described as bestial, abnormally sexual, inherently racially inferior and unresponsive to initiatives designed to provide shelter for them. The fourth discourse, "Us and them cum us against them" arises from ideas that view street children as inherently different to mainstream children and adults, thereby pitting street children against society at large and representing them as enemies. These four interrelated discourses ultimately converge to produce both enabling and constraining effects that are sometimes contradictory in nature. Discourses intended to render street children visible sometimes ironically make them and their plight invisible. The study is concluded with discussions of methodological limitations, suggestions for future investigation and the pyscho-emotive shifts I experienced during the research process. / Psychology / M.A. (Psychology)
8

The invisible who will not disappear : a discourse analysis of South African writings on street children

Levy-Seedat, Alicia Vincenti Nerine 06 1900 (has links)
Street children are present in every metropolitan city around the world. Their presence has provoked varied responses from academics, the media and others. However, despite the proliferation of responses, current solutions are not always commensurate with the resources expended in this area. Are current responses a part of the problem or a part of the solution? Following the precedence established by other researchers and calls for greater reflexivity, this study attempts to provide a critical analysis of selected South African writings on and about street children. Particular focus is accorded to how selected academic and popular writings construct street children. The specific aim is to facilitate an examination of the underlying discourses that inform South African writings on street children. The role that academic and popular writings fulfil in selectively maintaining the status quo over which their authors sometimes voice disapproval is also examined. Wherever possible the origins of such discourses and the powers that maintain them are referred to. The extent to which the discourses evident in writings on South African street children converge with the dominant discourses present in developmental psychology as a whole are reviewed. The complimentary techniques of transformative inquiry and discourse analysis are at the heart of the methodology in this study. As an analytical tool discourse analysis is used to deepen current understanding of perceptions of street children. Discourse analysis helps to chart the underlying discourses drawn on in texts and shows how writings have influenced, intentionally or otherwise, the perceptions of subjects of research. Transformative enquiry as a significant · complimentary, albeit implicit, feature of discourse analysis enables a reflection on the research process itself. Four main discourses are discussed, each of which is centred around several sub-discourses. The first discourse, "He who pays the piper calls the tune" involves an objectification of street children, conveying negative' images of street children. The second discourse, "St. Jude the Patron Saint of Lost Causes" is rooted in the ideas of hopelessness, helplessness, victimology and ubiquitousness. The third discourse, "natured versus nurtured" is located in ideas of biological determinism within which street children are described as bestial, abnormally sexual, inherently racially inferior and unresponsive to initiatives designed to provide shelter for them. The fourth discourse, "Us and them cum us against them" arises from ideas that view street children as inherently different to mainstream children and adults, thereby pitting street children against society at large and representing them as enemies. These four interrelated discourses ultimately converge to produce both enabling and constraining effects that are sometimes contradictory in nature. Discourses intended to render street children visible sometimes ironically make them and their plight invisible. The study is concluded with discussions of methodological limitations, suggestions for future investigation and the pyscho-emotive shifts I experienced during the research process. / Psychology / M.A. (Psychology)
9

Discourse, disease and displacement : interrogating selected South African textual constructions of AIDS

Horne, Felicity June 06 1900 (has links)
This thesis explores the theme of displacement in AIDS (Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome)-related discourse in post-apartheid South Africa in the period 1994−2010. It contends that the subject of AIDS and the AIDS-ill is seldom confronted directly in the discourse, but displaced in various ways. Using the theory of social constructionism and the discourse theory of the French poststructuralists, particularly Michel Foucault, selected texts, both literary and non-literary, are subjected to discourse analysis, in which the interrelationships between linguistic and visual representations of AIDS, practice, knowledge and power relations are examined. Recognising that all representations are to some extent displaced constructions, the thesis investigates additional reasons for the particular kinds of displacement of AIDS seen in AIDS discourse. These include stigma, fear, defensiveness and the enduring power of preexisting discourses onto which AIDS is grafted. In narratives by and about the AIDS-ill, personal stories are displaced when mythical structures are used to give meaning to what could otherwise be viewed as futile, random suffering. As a result of the different displacement devices employed in AIDS discourse, new meanings of AIDS are constructed, related to the social, political and cultural context out of which they have arisen. The thesis comprises five chapters, each of which explores a different form of displacement. In Chapter 1, 'Displacing AIDS through Language', the focus is on language as a form and means of displacement; Chapter 2 'Politicising AIDS' explores the way that AIDS discourse is projected onto the larger, well-established discourse of politics, and specifically on the discourse of 'the struggle' against apartheid; while Chapter 3, 'Satirising AIDS', considers the way that satirists displace AIDS through irony, exposing the contradictions and absurdities inherent in the discourse. Chapter 4, 'Gendering AIDS', shows the extent to which AIDS-relared discourse is articulated to gender-related issues such as unequal power relations between men and women and stereotypical views of women's identities and 'proper' roles. The final chapter, Chapter 5, 'Narrating AIDS', deals with the discourse of personal illness narratives, showing how individuals displace the experience of illness through narrative, often using the structures of myth to give meaning to their experience. / English Studies / D. Litt. et Phil. (English Studies)
10

Immigrant learners learning linear programming in multilingual classrooms in South Africa

Nkambule, Thulisile 02 1900 (has links)
This study used discourse analysis (Gee, 2011; 2005; 1999) in order to explore a socio-situated view of how teachers created learning opportunities for the participation of immigrant learners when learning linear programming in a Grade 11 mathematics classroom in South Africa. The aim was to explore that which mathematics teachers do in classrooms with immigrant learners that they will not do if there were no immigrants. A discourse analysis approach was used in order to view the opportunities created through language use not as a tool for communication only but also as a tool for building reality. The study reported in this thesis was conducted in three different settings which are in; urban, township and rural environments. The urban environment focuses on immigrant learners who were born in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC), and started schooling there, in the township and rural environment it focuses on immigrant learners born in South Africa with parents born in the Republic of Mozambique or Angola. Three different mathematics classrooms were observed in their natural environment during lessons focusing on linear programming. Data was collected through a learner questionnaire issued before lesson observations. The aim of the learner questionnaire was to understand the language background of the learners in the mathematics classrooms selected for the study. The second method included lesson observation for at most five consecutive days at each setting. It involved observing teachers and immigrant learners during teaching sessions of linear programming activities. The activities included reading, writing, speaking and participating in mathematical activities. These activities were then analysed to understand how teachers created learning opportunities for the immigrant learners. The study contextualised the results from lesson observations by conducting clinical interviews with three immigrant learners, one from each site, to provide insights into the explanations on immigrant learners approaches when solving a linear programming task. The main conclusion in this study is that immigrant learners were successful in linear programming when teachers’ created learning opportunities by using code switching to support them. The main contribution of this study is that it focuses on multilingual mathematics classrooms of immigrant learners in South Africa – a context that has not yet been researched in South African vi mathematics education. Exploring language practices in multilingual mathematics classrooms of immigrant learners provides a different gaze into teaching and learning mathematics in multilingual classrooms in South Africa. Equally important is the extent to which immigrant learners are distinct to multilingual learners in the teaching and learning of linear programming. / Mathematics Education / D. Phil. (Mathematics, Science and Technology Education)

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