• Refine Query
  • Source
  • Publication year
  • to
  • Language
  • 6
  • Tagged with
  • 6
  • 6
  • 6
  • 6
  • 4
  • 4
  • 4
  • 3
  • 3
  • 3
  • 3
  • 2
  • 2
  • 2
  • 2
  • About
  • The Global ETD Search service is a free service for researchers to find electronic theses and dissertations. This service is provided by the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations.
    Our metadata is collected from universities around the world. If you manage a university/consortium/country archive and want to be added, details can be found on the NDLTD website.
1

Implementation of the national language policy at institutions of higher education

Ownhouse, Aileen Lucia January 2015 (has links)
This study investigated the implementation progress of the National Language Policy (NLP) of South Africa (SA) by reviewing pertinent research related to Language Policy (LP) initiatives. In particular, the study explored the implications of the NLP implementation on multilingual teaching and learning practices, especially practices aimed at developing proficiency in the Language of Learning and Teaching (LOLT). In particular, the LP implementation initiatives to support a multilingual practice community at Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University (NMMU) were overviewed. The study focused on and assessed the AHZ Project multilingual initiative in the Department of Applied Language Studies (DALS) at NMMU. The AHZ Project multilingual initiative included text translation and multilingual tutorial strategies to assist isiXhosa-speaking students understand grammatical concepts. As a result, an aim of this study was to determine the efficacy of the AHZ Project by assessing the perceptions of English Language Studies (LES111) students and lecturers who were responsible for implementing the initiative. Finally, the research aimed to determine reasons for the apparent slow progress of implementing multilingualism as a teaching and learning practice as well as the underlying constraints of implementing the NLP at Higher Education Institutions (HEIs). A mixed-method approach was selected to explore the aims of the research study as both quantitative and qualitative data collection tools were used. As the AHZ Project initiative was the study’s data sample, data was collected by conducting three face-to-face semi-structured interviews with two LES111 lecturers and a tutor as well as one focus-group interview with eight student participants. In addition, a LEC online assessment and 284 LES111 reflective paragraphs were analysed. NVivo 10 qualitative software was used for the coding of the data and a descriptive analysis of the interviews as well as the LEC online assessment was employed. To code and analyse the face-to-face semi-structured and focus-group interview transcripts, dominant themes from the study’s literature review, for example, Second Language Acquisition (SLA) and Mother Tongue (MT) transfer were used. The reflective paragraphs were analysed manually using a quantitative coding approach. From the data coding, the study’s findings were determined and interpreted. The LEC assessment confirmed that the students were not coping with the LOLT. By taking cognisance of the AHZ Project strategies and investigating the perceptions of the participants towards the initiative, conclusions were drawn. These conclusions indicated positive attitudes towards the multilingual language practices as implemented by the AHZ Project initiative. In addition, the perceptions towards identity, language status, mother tongue education and language transfer were articulated. Based on the findings of the study, recommendations were made to promote the use of African Languages as LOLTs in teaching and learning classroom practices. Recommendations were also made for future research relating to the teaching of African Languages (ALs) in the schooling sector.
2

Implementation of multilingualism in South African higher education : exploring the use of isiXhosa in teaching and learning at Rhodes University

Gambushe, Wanga January 2015 (has links)
This study explores the implementation of multilingualism at Rhodes University (RU), by examining the teaching and learning practices of lecturers, demonstrators and students within the Cell Biology module, offered by the Biological Sciences and Botany departments at RU. This examination is in line with RU’s Language Policy (2005/2014), which recognises multilingualism and the development of isiXhosa as an academic/scientific language. The study and the choice for the location of the study within RU was motivated by what seemed to be a pattern of under achievement of LOTE speaking students studying Cell Biology. This pattern necessitated a further inquiry into the language aspect of the teaching and learning of Cell Biology. The goals of this research were to investigate spaces where LOTE students use their home languages and the motivations behind their usage of those languages. Due to the varying proficiencies of LOTE students in their mother tongue, this study sought to investigate the language capabilities of LOTE students in their home languages. The perceptions of the main role players in the Cell Biology module were sought, in order to get an idea of what students, lecturers and demonstrators thought about multilingualism in teaching and learning practices in the Cell Biology module. This study has discovered that there is a disparity in achievement between LOTE and English speaking students, with English students outperforming LOTE students consistently in the period investigated. On the language capabilities of LOTE students in their mother tongue, it was discovered that they have enough linguistic capital for a mother tongue intervention to succeed. There were mixed views about the use of LOTE in HE, but students were mostly in favour of the use of LOTE. A number of recommendations are made as to how multilingualism can be implemented in Cell Biology. In this study I argue that there is a need to use the mother tongue of LOTE students in order to support learning, the mother tongue intervention is supported by scholars such as Paxton (2007, 2009; Madiba 2011, 2012, 2014). The use of the mother tongue to support learning should be a short-term measure while the process of the development of African languages is underway, because languages develop as they are used, and form follows function (Madiba 2008). Ultimately, African languages should be developed and use as academic languages in HE not only in order to fulfil the legislative imperatives such as the Constitution and the Language Policy Higher Education but also to increase access and success among LOTE students.
3

Immigrant learners learning linear programming in multilingual classrooms in South Africa

Nkambule, Thulisile 02 1900 (has links)
This study used discourse analysis (Gee, 2011; 2005; 1999) in order to explore a socio-situated view of how teachers created learning opportunities for the participation of immigrant learners when learning linear programming in a Grade 11 mathematics classroom in South Africa. The aim was to explore that which mathematics teachers do in classrooms with immigrant learners that they will not do if there were no immigrants. A discourse analysis approach was used in order to view the opportunities created through language use not as a tool for communication only but also as a tool for building reality. The study reported in this thesis was conducted in three different settings which are in; urban, township and rural environments. The urban environment focuses on immigrant learners who were born in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC), and started schooling there, in the township and rural environment it focuses on immigrant learners born in South Africa with parents born in the Republic of Mozambique or Angola. Three different mathematics classrooms were observed in their natural environment during lessons focusing on linear programming. Data was collected through a learner questionnaire issued before lesson observations. The aim of the learner questionnaire was to understand the language background of the learners in the mathematics classrooms selected for the study. The second method included lesson observation for at most five consecutive days at each setting. It involved observing teachers and immigrant learners during teaching sessions of linear programming activities. The activities included reading, writing, speaking and participating in mathematical activities. These activities were then analysed to understand how teachers created learning opportunities for the immigrant learners. The study contextualised the results from lesson observations by conducting clinical interviews with three immigrant learners, one from each site, to provide insights into the explanations on immigrant learners approaches when solving a linear programming task. The main conclusion in this study is that immigrant learners were successful in linear programming when teachers’ created learning opportunities by using code switching to support them. The main contribution of this study is that it focuses on multilingual mathematics classrooms of immigrant learners in South Africa – a context that has not yet been researched in South African vi mathematics education. Exploring language practices in multilingual mathematics classrooms of immigrant learners provides a different gaze into teaching and learning mathematics in multilingual classrooms in South Africa. Equally important is the extent to which immigrant learners are distinct to multilingual learners in the teaching and learning of linear programming. / Mathematics Education / D. Phil. (Mathematics, Science and Technology Education)
4

Immigrant learners learning linear programming in multilingual classrooms in South Africa

Nkambule, Thulisile 02 1900 (has links)
This study used discourse analysis (Gee, 2011; 2005; 1999) in order to explore a socio-situated view of how teachers created learning opportunities for the participation of immigrant learners when learning linear programming in a Grade 11 mathematics classroom in South Africa. The aim was to explore that which mathematics teachers do in classrooms with immigrant learners that they will not do if there were no immigrants. A discourse analysis approach was used in order to view the opportunities created through language use not as a tool for communication only but also as a tool for building reality. The study reported in this thesis was conducted in three different settings which are in; urban, township and rural environments. The urban environment focuses on immigrant learners who were born in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC), and started schooling there, in the township and rural environment it focuses on immigrant learners born in South Africa with parents born in the Republic of Mozambique or Angola. Three different mathematics classrooms were observed in their natural environment during lessons focusing on linear programming. Data was collected through a learner questionnaire issued before lesson observations. The aim of the learner questionnaire was to understand the language background of the learners in the mathematics classrooms selected for the study. The second method included lesson observation for at most five consecutive days at each setting. It involved observing teachers and immigrant learners during teaching sessions of linear programming activities. The activities included reading, writing, speaking and participating in mathematical activities. These activities were then analysed to understand how teachers created learning opportunities for the immigrant learners. The study contextualised the results from lesson observations by conducting clinical interviews with three immigrant learners, one from each site, to provide insights into the explanations on immigrant learners approaches when solving a linear programming task. The main conclusion in this study is that immigrant learners were successful in linear programming when teachers’ created learning opportunities by using code switching to support them. The main contribution of this study is that it focuses on multilingual mathematics classrooms of immigrant learners in South Africa – a context that has not yet been researched in South African vi mathematics education. Exploring language practices in multilingual mathematics classrooms of immigrant learners provides a different gaze into teaching and learning mathematics in multilingual classrooms in South Africa. Equally important is the extent to which immigrant learners are distinct to multilingual learners in the teaching and learning of linear programming. / Mathematics Education / D. Phil. (Mathematics, Science and Technology Education)
5

Exploration of educational challenges of immigrant children at selected foundation phase schools in South Africa

Babane, Constance Vusiwana 09 September 2019 (has links)
Educational challenges of immigrant children in South African schools include among others, poor English proficiency. This challenge poses a challenge of negative self-efficacy to teachers. I became aware of the immigrants’ challenges from the teachers’ complaints. The teachers complained about the immigrant learners’ poor English proficiency and behaviour. I also became aware that the immigrant learners isolated themselves from the local learners. They also did not participate actively during oral classroom activities. I sought to investigate the immigrant learners’ language challenges and how these challenges influence their behaviour in the learning environment. The question that arose is: How does the language challenge of immigrant children in the Foundation Phase classes of South African schools influence their behaviour in the learning environment? The study consists of six chapters. The literature reviewed provided psychological and sociological theories that explain the relationship between language and behaviour. Programmes that were designed by various education systems were looked at in order to ascertain how the language challenges and behaviour of immigrant school children have unfolded and dealt with in different countries. The qualitative research method was used. This was a case study of three schools situated in Tshwane North district. Sampling was purposive and data was collected by means of observations, focus group interviews, individual interviews and artefacts. Ethical considerations were also presented. The findings from the data indicate that immigrant learners experience a great deal of frustration, sadness, anxiety and stress relating to coping with prejudice and discrimination because of their poor English. Teachers were also distressed by their inability to assist these learners. A programme that integrates language teaching with social skills is suggested. The aim is to foster a positive learning environment by incorporating psychosocial content in language teaching. A positive learning environment promotes positive behaviour. / Psychology of Education / D. Ed. (Psychology of Education)
6

Language as a factor influencing teaching and learning mathematical literacy at grade 12 in Moloto circuit of Limpopo Province

Nyandoro, Kingston 01 1900 (has links)
The study was carried out to: (1) determine the relationship between English and mathematical literacy scores at Grade 12 in Moloto Circuit, (2) understand and describe the learning difficulties experienced by learners when English language was used as a medium of instruction, and (3) suggest guidelines that could be used in teaching mathematical literacy. Regression and correlation analyses were carried out to determine the functional and strength of relationship between English language and mathematical literacy in the ten schools of Moloto Circuit. The views of the learners on the use of English language in the learning of mathematical literacy and the use of technical terms were sourced and analysed. The views of the educators about the use of English language as the medium of instruction were also analysed. A mixed approach methodology was used since both quantitative and qualitative methods were employed. The target population consisted of 305 learners who wrote the Grade 12 public examinations in 2016, 585 Grade 12 learners and 10 educators who completed questionnaires in January 2017. A census approach was carried out because everyone in Moloto Circuit doing Mathematical Literacy at Grade 12 level and their educators were studied. Grade 12 results for English and Mathematical Literacy for the 2016 academic year were collected and analysed. Questionnaires with closed and open-ended items were administered on Grade 12 learners and educators for the 2017 academic year in January 2017. Results in the ten schools showed that there was a positive relationship between performances in the two areas. In all cases the computed correlations were significant. This suggested that English influenced performance in Mathematical Literacy. This was supported by coefficients of determination calculations which ranged from 15% to 40%. Most responses indicated that learners found Mathematical Literacy difficult when English language was used as the medium of instruction. The learners preferred that Mathematical Literacy be taught in their mother tongue and that educators explain technical terms associated with mathematics. The educators said that learners had problems in Mathematical Literacy because of the use of English as the medium of instruction. They also said that learners found it difficult to relate Mathematical Literacy questions to real life situations and that the learners lacked adequate practice. The educators recommended the use of code-switching in their teaching in order to enhance understanding of Mathematical Literacy. / Mathematics Education / M. Ed. (Mathematics Education)

Page generated in 0.1284 seconds