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  • About
  • The Global ETD Search service is a free service for researchers to find electronic theses and dissertations. This service is provided by the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations.
    Our metadata is collected from universities around the world. If you manage a university/consortium/country archive and want to be added, details can be found on the NDLTD website.
1

Testing gender differences in a model for exercise adherence in U.S. Army reservists /

Simpson, Mary Ellen, January 1998 (has links)
Thesis (Ph. D.)--University of Missouri--Columbia, 1998. / "May 1998." Typescript. Vita. Includes bibliographical references (leaves 103-112). Also available on the Internet.
2

Katkokävelyn veretön funktiodiagnostiikka ja sen soveltaminen liikuntaharjoitusten seurannassa

Härkönen, Risto, January 1979 (has links)
Thesis (doctoral)--Turku, 1979. / "English summary: Intermittent claudication: noninvasive functional evaluation in diagnosis and follow-up of physical training."
3

A study of the balance of shoulder agonist and antagonist muscle during concentric and eccentric action: a quantifiable isokinetic assessment of the strength ratio.

January 1996 (has links)
by Choi Man. / Year shown on spine: 1997. / Thesis (M.Phil.)--Chinese University of Hong Kong, 1996. / Includes bibliographical references (leaves 146-153). / Abstract --- p.1 / Chapter 1 --- Introduction --- p.3 / Chapter 1.1 --- Anatomy --- p.4 / Chapter 1.2 --- Kinematics of the overhead sports --- p.6 / Chapter 1.3 --- Isokinetics assessment of the shoulder rotators --- p.8 / Chapter 1.4 --- Objectives of the study --- p.10 / Chapter 1.5 --- Method of investigation --- p.11 / Chapter 1.5.1 --- Subject --- p.12 / Chapter 1.5.2 --- Equipment --- p.13 / Chapter 1.5.3 --- Protocol --- p.14 / Chapter 1.6 --- Data Management --- p.17 / Chapter 1.7 --- Clinical application --- p.18 / Chapter 1.8 --- Definition of terms --- p.18 / Chapter 2 --- Literture Review --- p.20 / Chapter 2.1 --- Anatomy --- p.20 / Chapter 2.1.1 --- Ligament --- p.21 / Chapter 2.1.2 --- Muscles --- p.24 / Chapter 2.2 --- Biomechanics of the overhead movement --- p.30 / Chapter 2.2.1 --- Wind up Phase --- p.32 / Chapter 2.2.2 --- Cocking Phase --- p.33 / Chapter 2.2.3 --- Acceleration Phase --- p.36 / Chapter 2.2.4 --- Deceleration Phase --- p.38 / Chapter 2.3 --- Eccentric contraction --- p.40 / Chapter 2.3.1 --- Physiology of eccentric contraction --- p.40 / Chapter 2.3.2 --- Mechanical trauma in eccentric contraction & DOMS --- p.41 / Chapter 2.3.3 --- Eccentric contraction in Plyometric --- p.43 / Chapter 2.3.4 --- Role of eccentric contraction in overhead sports --- p.44 / Chapter 2.3.5 --- Comparison with concentric contraction --- p.45 / Chapter 2.4 --- Isokinetics --- p.46 / Chapter 2.4.1 --- Introduction to isokinetics --- p.46 / Chapter 2.4.2 --- Reliability of isokinetic assessment on Shoulder rotator --- p.48 / Chapter 2.4.3 --- Agonist / Antagonist Ratio --- p.51 / Chapter 2.4.4 --- Variation of torques with testing protocols --- p.52 / Chapter 2.4.5 --- Comparison of muscle torques in different groups --- p.56 / Chapter 2.4.6 --- Isokinetic eccentric contraction of shoulder Rotators --- p.62 / Chapter 3 --- Method of Investigation --- p.63 / Chapter 3.1 --- Subject --- p.64 / Chapter 3.1.1 --- Part One --- p.64 / Chapter 3.1.2 --- Part Two --- p.65 / Chapter 3.1.3 --- Criteria of subject recruitment --- p.65 / Chapter 3.2 --- Equipment --- p.66 / Chapter 3.2.1 --- Collection of medical history and general informations --- p.66 / Chapter 3.2.2 --- Test for general laxity --- p.66 / Chapter 3.2.3 --- Test for shoulder impingement --- p.72 / Chapter 3.2.4 --- Test for shoulder instability --- p.73 / Chapter 3.2.5 --- Joint range measurement --- p.76 / Chapter 3.2.6 --- Isokinetic strength of shoulder rotators --- p.78 / Chapter 3.3 --- Calibration --- p.79 / Chapter 3.4 --- Testing procedure --- p.79 / Chapter 3.4.1 --- "Explanation,warning & consent" --- p.79 / Chapter 3.4.2 --- Warming up --- p.80 / Chapter 3.4.3 --- Screening --- p.81 / Chapter 3.4.4 --- Isokinetic testing of the rotational strength of both shoulders --- p.81 / Chapter 3.5 --- Operator --- p.87 / Chapter 3.6 --- Data Management --- p.88 / Chapter 3.6.1 --- Part One --- p.88 / Chapter 3.6.2 --- Part Two --- p.89 / Chapter 4 --- Result --- p.91 / Chapter 4.1 --- Part One --- p.89 / Chapter 4.1.1 --- Intra-class correlation coefficient --- p.90 / Chapter 4.1.2 --- Correlation between the PTR & the ASMSTR --- p.92 / Chapter 4.2 --- Part Two --- p.94 / Chapter 4.2.1 --- Comparison between the Members in the Hong Kong Badminton Team with the Non-athlete Subjects --- p.94 / Chapter 4.2.2 --- Comparison between the Badminton Players in the Hong Kong Team and the Hong Kong National Junior Team --- p.105 / Chapter 5 --- Discussion --- p.111 / Chapter 5.1 --- General discussion of the design of the study --- p.111 / Chapter 5.1.1 --- Subject --- p.111 / Chapter 5.1.2 --- Specific test --- p.112 / Chapter 5.1.3 --- Warming up --- p.112 / Chapter 5.1.4 --- Testing protocol --- p.113 / Chapter 5.2 --- Part One --- p.116 / Chapter 5.2.1 --- Test-retest reliability --- p.117 / Chapter 5.2.2 --- Correlation between the PTR and the ASMSTR --- p.120 / Chapter 5.3 --- Part two --- p.122 / Chapter 5.3.1 --- Comparison between the HKT and the non- athletes --- p.123 / Chapter 5.3.2 --- Presentation of torque ratio in the HKJ --- p.133 / Chapter 5.3.3 --- Performance in those with history of shoulder problem --- p.134 / Chapter 5.4 --- Clinical application and suggestion for further study --- p.139 / Chapter 6 --- Conclusion --- p.144 / Chapter 7 --- Reference --- p.146 / Chapter 8 --- Appendix
4

Assessing the use of the steep ramp test in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

Chura, Robyn Lorraine 21 September 2009
The purpose of this study was to compare power output and ventilatory measurements between the steep ramp test (SR) and both the 30-second Wingate anaerobic (WAT) and standard cardiopulmonary exercise tests (CPET) in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). 11 patients (7 males and 4 females) underwent spirometry, a CPET, WAT and SR test. Repeated measures ANOVA was used to compare the differences between the peak work rate of the CPET (CPET<sub>peak</sub>), SR (SR<sub>peak</sub>), and the average power of the WAT (W<sub>avg</sub>). The W<sub>avg</sub> was higher than the SR<sub>peak</sub>, which was higher than the CPET (231.2 ± 113.4, 156.8 ± 67.9, 65.9 ± 35.9, p>0.05 respectively). There were no differences found between the tests at end-exercise for inspiratory reserve volume (IRV), ventilation (V<sub>E</sub>), and end-expiratory lung volume (EELV). Tidal volume (V<sub>T</sub>) was also compared between the tests as a percentage of the inspiratory capacity (IC) remaining at end-exercise and no differences were found. The similarity between the ventilatory measures indicates a similar level of constraint, despite the large difference in work rates achieved, in all 3 tests. This shows that a standard CPET underestimates leg power in COPD patients, and the WAT and SR may be better indicators of leg muscle power and anaerobic type exercise.
5

Assessing the use of the steep ramp test in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

Chura, Robyn Lorraine 21 September 2009 (has links)
The purpose of this study was to compare power output and ventilatory measurements between the steep ramp test (SR) and both the 30-second Wingate anaerobic (WAT) and standard cardiopulmonary exercise tests (CPET) in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). 11 patients (7 males and 4 females) underwent spirometry, a CPET, WAT and SR test. Repeated measures ANOVA was used to compare the differences between the peak work rate of the CPET (CPET<sub>peak</sub>), SR (SR<sub>peak</sub>), and the average power of the WAT (W<sub>avg</sub>). The W<sub>avg</sub> was higher than the SR<sub>peak</sub>, which was higher than the CPET (231.2 ± 113.4, 156.8 ± 67.9, 65.9 ± 35.9, p>0.05 respectively). There were no differences found between the tests at end-exercise for inspiratory reserve volume (IRV), ventilation (V<sub>E</sub>), and end-expiratory lung volume (EELV). Tidal volume (V<sub>T</sub>) was also compared between the tests as a percentage of the inspiratory capacity (IC) remaining at end-exercise and no differences were found. The similarity between the ventilatory measures indicates a similar level of constraint, despite the large difference in work rates achieved, in all 3 tests. This shows that a standard CPET underestimates leg power in COPD patients, and the WAT and SR may be better indicators of leg muscle power and anaerobic type exercise.
6

Growth hormone in athletes /

Ehrnborg, Christer, January 2007 (has links)
Diss. (sammanfattning) Göteborg : Göteborgs universitet, 2007. / Härtill 5 uppsatser.
7

Studies on the early detection of coronary insufficiency /

Kanaungnit Chanjaroen, Chusak Vejbaesya, January 1979 (has links) (PDF)
Thesis (M.Sc. (Physiology))--Mahidol University, 1979.
8

Estimating VO2max Using a Personalized Step Test

Webb, Catherine 27 March 2012 (has links) (PDF)
The purpose of this study was to develop a personalized step test and a valid regression model that used non-exercise data and data collected during the step test to estimate VO2max in males and females 18 to 30 years of age. All participants (N= 80) successfully completed a step test with the starting step rate and step height being determined by the self-reported perceived functional ability (PFA) score and participant's height, respectively. All participants completed a maximal graded exercise test (GXT) to measure VO2max. Multiple linear regression analysis yielded the following equation (R = 0.90, SEE = 3.43 mL/kg/min): 45.938 + 9.253(G) - 0.140(KG) + 0.670(PFA) + 0.429(FSR) - 0.149(45sRHR) to predict VO2max (mL/kg/min) where: G is gender (0=female;1=male), KG is body mass in kg, PFA is the sum of the two PFA questions, FSR is the final step rate (step-ups/min), and 45sRHR is the recovery heart rate 45 seconds following the conclusion of the step test. Each independent variable was significant (p < 0.05) in predicting VO2max and the resulting regression equation accounted for roughly 83% (R2=0.8281) of the shared variance of measured VO2max. Based on the standardized B-weights, gender (0.606) explained the largest proportion of variance in VO2max values followed by PFA (0.315), body mass (-0.256), FSR (-0.248), and the 45sRHR (-0.238). The cross validation statistics (RPRESS = 0.88, SEEPRESS = 3.57 (mL/kg/min-1) show minimal shrinkage in the accuracy of the regression model. This study presents a relatively accurate model to predict VO2max from a submaximal step test that is convenient, easy to administer, and individualized.
9

Effects of Exercise test Information on Self-Efficacy and Anxiety in Patients with Myocardial Infarction

Erling, Joan 07 1900 (has links)
The primary purpose of this study was to examine the effects of preparatory information regarding the cycle ergometer exercise tolerance test on self-efficacy and anxiety of patients following a myocardial infarction (MI). The study also examined the effect self-efficacy on exercise test performance. A secondary purpose of the study was to investigate the effects of preparatory information and coping style on anxiety associated with the exercise test. Male cardiac patients ( N =30) ages 40-66 years (X=55 yrs.) who had documented MI based on at least two of the following: 1. a significant increase in cardiac enzyme levels 2. ECG diagnostic of HI or 3. chest pain and who were referred for a maximum performance exercise tolerance test two to six weeks post-infarction (X=4 weeks) were eligible for the study. Exclusion criteria consisted of unstable angina and/or uncontrolled dysrhythmias. All patients completed three self-report psychological questionnaires upon arrival at the laboratory: the A-state and A-trait portions of the Spielberger State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI), the Miller Behavioral Style Scale (MBSS) and the physical self-efficacy assessment. Based on their pre-intervention cycling self-efficacy scores, patients were then randomly assigned to the experimental or control conditions. The experimental videotape included detailed procedural and sensory information about the exercise tolerance test as it was being performed by a cardiac patient. The control videotape included information about nutrition as it relates to coronary heart disease. Subsequent to viewing either the experimental or control videotapes, the A-state portion of the STAI and the self-efficacy assessment were re-administered. Patients then performed the exercise tolerance test on the cycle ergometer. Cycling self-efficacy of patients in the experimental condition (preparatory information) decreased whereas the cycling self-efficacy of patients in the control condition increased minimally resulting in a significant difference in self-efficacy between the two intervention groups ( p <.04). Anxiety of patients in the experimental intervention increased while there was virtually no change in anxiety in patients in the control condition ( p <.01). Patients with high pre-intervention cycling self-efficacy achieved higher mean maximum power output ( p <.001) than patients with low pre-intervention cycling self-efficacy. No interactions were found between coping style and preparatory information on the relative change in state anxiety. Anxiety in patients in the experimental group increased whereas anxiety in patients in the control group remained virtually unchanged, regardless of coping style ( p <.01). The data suggest that there is no basis for providing preparatory information regarding the exercise tolerance test to increase self-efficacy and to lower anxiety. The results indicate that self-efficacy is important in predicting exercise test performance. Preparatory information about the exercise tolerance test appears to increase anxiety regardless of coping style. / Thesis / Master of Science (MS)
10

Lung function in relation to exercise capacity in health and disease

Farkhooy, Amir January 2017 (has links)
Background: Exercise capacity (EC) is widely recognized as a strong and independent predictor of mortality and disease progression in various diseases, including cardiovascular and pulmonary diseases. Furthermore, it is generally accepted that exercise capacity in healthy individuals and in patients suffering from cardiovascular diseases is mainly limited by the maximum cardiac output. Objectives: This thesis investigated the impact of different lung function indices on EC in healthy individuals, patients with cardiovascular disease (e.g., pulmonary hypertension (PH)) and patients with pulmonary disease (e.g., chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD)). Methods: The present thesis is based on cross-sectional and longitudinal analyses of patients suffering from COPD, attending pulmonary rehabilitation at Uppsala University Hospital (studies I and II), and healthy men enrolled in the “Oslo ischemia study” (study IV). Study III is a cross-sectional study of patients suffering from PH attending the San Giovanni Battista University Hospital in Turin. EC was assessed using a bicycle ergometer in studies I and IV, with 12-minute walk tests (12MWT) in study II and with 6-minute walk tests (6MWT) in study III. Extensive pulmonary function tests, including diffusing capacity of the lung (DLCO), were performed in studies I-III and dynamic spirometry was used to assess lung function in study IV. Results: DLCO is more closely linked to decreased levels of EC than airway obstruction in COPD patients. Furthermore, the decline in 12MWT over a 5-year period was mainly explained by deterioration in DLCO in COPD patients. Spirometric parameters indicating airway obstruction significantly related to EC and exercise-induced desaturation in PH patients. A significant, but weak association between lung function parameters and EC was found in healthy subjects and this association is strengthened with increasing age. Conclusion: DLCO is the strongest predictor of low EC and EC decline in COPD. In PH, airway obstruction is strongly related to reduced 6MWT. Therefore, extensive analysis of lung function, including measurements of diffusing capacity, along with standard assessment of airway obstruction, gives a more comprehensive assessment of the functional exercise capacity in patients suffering from pulmonary hypertension or COPD. Lung function is also significantly linked to EC even in healthy subjects, lacking evident cardiopulmonary diseases.

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