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  • About
  • The Global ETD Search service is a free service for researchers to find electronic theses and dissertations. This service is provided by the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations.
    Our metadata is collected from universities around the world. If you manage a university/consortium/country archive and want to be added, details can be found on the NDLTD website.
21

Sustainability of Preparations Programs Initiated through the Information Technology (IT) Professionals in Health Care Program

Scott, Nena Parrish 14 December 2018 (has links)
In 2010, the Office of National Coordinator (ONC), a branch of the federal government, launched a program called the IT Professionals in Health Care Program. The Program was intended to address the anticipated shortage of skilled workers in health information technology (HIT) and electronic health records (EHRs). According to the National Opinion Research Center (NORC, 2014), the ONC estimated a shortfall of 51,000 HIT workers over 5 years in terms of the number that would be needed to fully support health care providers and facilities in the adoption of EHRs. The growing demand for HIT professionals did not match the number of graduates that the health institutions were releasing into the job market. This pattern necessitated the training of more HIT professionals to reduce the predicted market deficit. The need for persons with specialized skill in HIT once again placed the community colleges in a central role in providing training of a workforce that can meet the market demand for employees with knowledge, skills and competencies in HIT. The current study is intended as a follow-up to that evaluation and seeks to identify the sustainability of the preparation programs initiated through the IT Professionals in Health Care Program in Region D colleges, which are those colleges in a consortium of 11 southern states. The study was conducted as a qualitative study in which 6 program directors at 6 of the 20 participating community colleges in region D were interviewed regarding their perceptions of the sustainability of the Health IT Workforce Development Program. In addition, websites and curriculum guides were analyzed so that the data could be triangulated with the interview responses. Interviews of the 6 program directors revealed that difficulties arose when employers questioned if students completing the program would be ready to take on the responsibilities necessary for the demanding positions that were available in the healthcare IT workforce. The 6 program directors interviewed stated a key area of improvement would have been to add a practicum that allowed for hands on experience as well as ensuring a suitable workload to for the program.
22

Public Funding of Education in Ontario: A Policy Proposal

Hielema, Rebecca K. 09 1900 (has links)
Within the past few decades, issues of public funding for religious schools in Ontario have re-entered the policy debate and have led to discussion about the different ways in which schools could be organized in this province. Through the integration of literature available on the varying ways in which to administer a public education system along with a contextual backdrop to religion and education in Ontario, this paper will propose a policy by which to accommodate requests of various religious groups for separate schools while at the same time increasing overall accountability within Ontario's schools, public and private. / Thesis / Master of Social Work (MSW)
23

Economic and Legislative Effects on Performance Based Funding and Licensed Practical Nursing Programs

Papa, Andrew 01 August 2015 (has links)
The purpose of this research paper is to evaluate different elements of the State University System of Florida. Specifically, this paper will analyze how universities will respond when appropriated 20 million dollars of performance based funding and will also evaluate how efficient the 2009 changes in Florida's [statute] 464 were. This paper will use comparative statics and a duopoly model in order to explain behavior of universities when they are appropriated performance based funding. Moreover, this paper will use measures of central tendencies and hypothesis testing in order to statistically analyze data of Florida's Licensed practical nursing programs provided in the 2013 OPPAGA Nursing education report. When all is said and done the findings in this paper could suggest statutory reform of Florida's [statute] 464.
24

The efficiency and sustainability of microfinance institutions in South Africa

06 June 2012 (has links)
M.Comm. / Microfinance refers to the provision of financial services, in particular small loans in the context of South Africa, to poor people with very small businesses. Commercial banks have largely considered poor people in remote areas unbankable, because they lack collateral and have no credit histories. Microfinance institutions emerged as unconventional institutions with innovative techniques, mechanisms and instruments to advance financial services to this segmented part of the population. This has, however, not been without challenges. Microfinance institutions face a number of challenges such as lack of competent human capital, unfavourable regulatory environment, and insufficient financing. The study examines if these challenges are applicable in the South African context and whether financial and operational inefficiency has hindered microfinance institutions in South Africa from sustainably increasing their outreach through the provision of microcredit. It surveys two microfinance institutions, characterised as non-governmental organisations using the group lending methodology to offer microloans to the very poor. The results indicate that microfinance institutions are not on a sound fiscal footing, and large operating expenses have resulted in some form of inefficiency. This has, however, not hindered the microfinance institutions from reaching a greater number of borrowers. The witnessed increased outreach in number of clients reached is considered unsustainable given the existence of inefficiency and financial weakness. The results suggest a number of policy options on the side of government and the institutions concerned. Increasing the funding sources available to microfinance institutions should be considered by both government and private institutions. This policy would succeed if microfinance institutions work at reducing their operational costs and become both efficient and sustainable so as to be seen as viable investment options.
25

Funding Status Projections for Southern Public Teaching Pension Plans

Trainor, William, Rochelle, Carolyn F. 01 March 2008 (has links)
The average funding status for eleven southern state pension plans used by teachers as of 2005 is 86%, which translates into over a $40 billion shortfall. Employing Monte Carlo simulation, this study projects the expected future funding status along with confidence intervals for each of these states over the next 10 years. Projections suggest the average underfunding will remain virtually the same based on current state pension contributions and asset allocations. However, if underlying pension asset returns fail to meet expectations due to high funding risk, the average underfunding could fall to 73%, a shortfall of over $150 billion.
26

Crowdfunding of condominium / Crowdfunding av bostadsrätter

Bengtsson, Anna January 2014 (has links)
The purpose of this thesis is to investigate whether a specific method of financing, so called Crowd Funding, CF, can be applied on the Swedish housing market. Limitations are made to the housing market of Stockholm since it is different in many ways from the housing market in the rest of the country. Real estate is only mentioned as examples of items in different funding methods when the new solution is aimed primarily for the condominium market. Problems are identified and investigated through interviews with officials involved in funding. Preliminary there is a historical background to the proposal, various needs that have arisen and why. The background includes the concept of CF as a method, its application and what it is that makes it so successful. This is followed by an overview of the conventional lending market in Sweden and an overview of a range of alternative financing methods that could be applied to the condominium property today. A solution based on a combination of CF and conventional mortgages is presented. It also follows issues that must be investigated and resolved in connection with the use of CF in combination with conventional mortgages. The problems are discussed in interviews with relevant officials and presented under the heading Results of the investigations. A brief overview of client funds and client accounts is provided as background for the reader to follow the reasoning that follows. Finally, there is a draft legally tenable agreement that could be applied to the presented solution. The thesis discusses legal parties and concepts in situations that might arise. Under alternative financing methods situations are discussed between lenders and borrowers. Lenders are usually institutional lenders, but may include private lenders as well. Borrowers are generally individuals. The whole relationship is built up as a form of credit where the risk premium is paid in a form of an option. This means that the funding schemes are mixed in a new form of financing, why the parties' names also may be mixed. / Syftet med denna uppsats är att undersöka om en specifik finansieringsmetod, så kallad Crowd Funding, CF, går att tillämpa på den svenska bostadsrättsmarknaden. Avgränsningar görs till Stockholms bostadsrättsmarknad då denna skiljer sig på många sätt från bostadsmarknaden i resten av landet. Fastigheter tas endast upp som exempel på objekt inom finansieringsmetoder då den nya lösningen i första hand riktar sig till bostadsrättsobjekt. Problem identifieras och utreds genom intervjuer med funktionärer som arbetar med finansiering. Inledande presenteras bakgrunden till förslaget, olika behov som har uppstått och varför. Bakgrunden innefattar begreppet CF som metod, hur den tillämpats och vad det är som gör den så framgångsrik. Därefter ges en översikt över den konventionella lånemarknaden i Sverige och en översikt över en rad alternativa finansieringar som skulle kunna tillämpas på bostadsrättsobjekt idag. . En potentiell lösning av finansieringsproblematiken presenteras i form av ett förslag som innebär en kombination av CF och konventionella lån. Vidare följer problem som måste undersökas och lösas i samband med användning av CF och konventionella lån. Problemen diskuteras i intervjuer med relevanta funktionärer och presenteras under rubriken "Resultat från undersökningar" En kort översikt om klientmedel och klientmedelskonton ges som bakgrund till läsaren för att kunna följa resonemanget som följer. Slutligen presenteras ett utkast till juridiskt hållbart avtal som skulle kunna tillämpas på CF. I uppsatsen diskuteras juridiska parter och begrepp i situation som kan tänkas uppstå. Under alternativa finansieringsmetoder diskuteras situationer mellan långivare och låntagare. Långivare är normalt institutionella kreditgivare men kan även innefatta mer privata kreditgivare. Låntagare är generellt endast privatpersoner. Under avsnittet där CF helt eller delvis tillämpas på bostäder, benämns kreditgivare som investerare eller finansiär beroende på finansieringsform. Låntagaren, köpare av bostaden, benämns kredittagaren. Hela förhållandet är uppbyggt som en form av kreditgivning där riskpremien betalas ut i en form av option. Detta innebär att finansieringsmetoderna blandas i en ny form av finansiering, varför parternas benämningar också kan komma att blandas.
27

Risk stratification and management of patients presenting with suspected acute cardiac ischaemia at a Greater London Accident and Emergency Department

Farmer, Steven Alan January 1999 (has links)
No description available.
28

Funding Liquidity and Limits to Arbitrage

Aoun, Bassam 01 June 2012 (has links)
Arbitrageurs play an important role in keeping market prices close to their fundamental values by providing market liquidity. Most arbitrageurs however use leverage. When funding conditions worsen they are forced to reduce their positions. The resulting selling pressure depresses market prices, and in certain situations, pushes arbitrage spreads to levels exceeding many standard deviations. This phenomenon drove many century old financial institutions into bankruptcy during the 2007−2009 financial crisis. In this thesis, we provide empirical evidence and demonstrate analytically the effects of funding liquidity on arbitrage. We further discuss the implications for risk management. To conduct our empirical studies, we construct a novel Funding Liquidity Stress Index (FLSI) using principal components analysis. Its constituents are measures representing various funding channels. We study the relationship between the FLSI index and three di↵erent arbitrage strategies that we reproduce with real and daily transactional data. We show that the FLSI index has a strong explanatory power for changes in arbitrage spreads, and is an important source of contagion between various arbitrage strategies. In addition, we perform “event studies” surrounding events of changing margin requirements on futures contracts. The “event studies” provide empirical evidence supporting important assumptions and predictions of various theoretical work on market micro-structure. Next, we explain the mechanism through which funding liquidity affects arbitrage spreads. To do so, we study the liquidity risk premium in a market micro-structure framework where market prices are determined by the supply and demand of securities. We extend the model developed by Brunnermeier and Pedersen [BP09] to multiple periods and generalize their work by considering all market participants to be risk-averse. We further decompose the liquidity risk premium into two components: 1) a fundamental risk premium and 2) a systemic risk premium. The fundamental risk premium compensates market participants for providing liquidity in a security whose fundamental value is volatile, while the systemic risk premium compensates them for taking positions in a market that is vulnerable to funding liquidity. The first component is therefore related to the nature of the security while the second component is related to the fragility of the market micro-structure (such as leverage of market participants and margin setting mechanisms).
29

Funding Liquidity and Limits to Arbitrage

Aoun, Bassam 01 June 2012 (has links)
Arbitrageurs play an important role in keeping market prices close to their fundamental values by providing market liquidity. Most arbitrageurs however use leverage. When funding conditions worsen they are forced to reduce their positions. The resulting selling pressure depresses market prices, and in certain situations, pushes arbitrage spreads to levels exceeding many standard deviations. This phenomenon drove many century old financial institutions into bankruptcy during the 2007−2009 financial crisis. In this thesis, we provide empirical evidence and demonstrate analytically the effects of funding liquidity on arbitrage. We further discuss the implications for risk management. To conduct our empirical studies, we construct a novel Funding Liquidity Stress Index (FLSI) using principal components analysis. Its constituents are measures representing various funding channels. We study the relationship between the FLSI index and three di↵erent arbitrage strategies that we reproduce with real and daily transactional data. We show that the FLSI index has a strong explanatory power for changes in arbitrage spreads, and is an important source of contagion between various arbitrage strategies. In addition, we perform “event studies” surrounding events of changing margin requirements on futures contracts. The “event studies” provide empirical evidence supporting important assumptions and predictions of various theoretical work on market micro-structure. Next, we explain the mechanism through which funding liquidity affects arbitrage spreads. To do so, we study the liquidity risk premium in a market micro-structure framework where market prices are determined by the supply and demand of securities. We extend the model developed by Brunnermeier and Pedersen [BP09] to multiple periods and generalize their work by considering all market participants to be risk-averse. We further decompose the liquidity risk premium into two components: 1) a fundamental risk premium and 2) a systemic risk premium. The fundamental risk premium compensates market participants for providing liquidity in a security whose fundamental value is volatile, while the systemic risk premium compensates them for taking positions in a market that is vulnerable to funding liquidity. The first component is therefore related to the nature of the security while the second component is related to the fragility of the market micro-structure (such as leverage of market participants and margin setting mechanisms).
30

FUNDING AUSTRALIAN CATHOLIC SCHOOLS FOR THE COMMON GOOD IN NEW TIMES: POLICY CONTEXTS, POLICY PARTICIPANTS AND THEORETICAL PERSPECTIVES

Furtado, Michael Leonard Unknown Date (has links)
Catholic schools in Australia, which educate about twenty per cent of the Australian school-going population, are private-sector schools. As such, they are substantially funded by a combination of grants from State and Commonwealth sources but have chosen to compensate for shortfalls in their operational expenses by charging fees. Successive Australian governments have for the past quarter of a century provided largely bipartisan support for the public funding of Catholic schools in Australia, yet the policy contexts in which this support has been given vary markedly. Prior to that, Catholic and other denominational schools were largely unfunded by the state, resulting in the near collapse of most non- Catholic denominational schools, when the Australian state entered the schools provision sphere in the last quarter of the nineteenth century. Catholic schools survived and prospered during the ensuing century largely by importing many thousands of teaching religious, principally from Ireland, but the strain began to show after the Second World War, when Australia embarked on a major expansion of its immigration program, and religious vocations from Ireland and elsewhere began to decline. The Australian Labor Party, for all kinds of socio-cultural reasons the major representative at the time of Catholic political interests, but split on the issue of state-aid, was keen to rebuild party unity and saw the public funding of non-government schools as the key to creating a dual system of education to meet Australia's schooling needs. It succeeded in doing this and in transporting itself to government by the pragmatic overcoming of the split and through a commitment to funding all Australian schools on a needs basis. Since the mid-seventies non-government schools have been the beneficiaries of a general resolution to the state-aid debate that has seen relatively little difference between both sides of politics on schools-funding matters and which has kept state-aid off the agenda of hitherto intractable political problems. However, recent trends in funding policy, vigorously driven by the Commonwealth Coalition government after 1996, with its pursuit of market-oriented policies in key social and economic areas, have fuelled the rapid deregulation of the Australian educational environment, starting with the rationalising of funds for government and non-government schools. At the forefront of such change, Catholic schools were regarded by the former Commonwealth Education Minister, Dr Kemp, as models of the future provision of Australian schooling, and as an example of the mutual obligation of the public and private sectors in relation to the provision of essential social goods and services. Catholic Education in Australia must therefore serve two political masters for quite distinctive and different reasons, viz. the Common or Public Good on the one hand, and the notion of parental or private choice on the other. The notion of the Common Good is the most central and fundamental element in Catholic Social Teaching, adjuring Roman Catholics to move beyond a morality that is purely personal to include the social and structural dimensions of public life. Will it be possible for Catholic Education to reconcile these two evidently mutually exclusive principles, while striving to meet its own commitments to bridging the gap between funding and costs with fees in the additional context of maintaining its mission to make its schools accessible to all Catholics? Thus, Catholic schools in Australia find themselves a century or so after the cessation of state aid, and twenty-five years after its recommencement, at yet another crossroads, with a multiplicity of new factors to consider in terms of funding policy. This thesis researches one way in which this multiplicity of apparently contradictory and mutually exclusive imperatives may agreeably be met in order to ensure the long-term viability of Catholic schools in Australia. It does so by investigating the proposal of the late Mr George Berkeley, a former Director- General of Education in Queensland, in his report on non-government schools in the Australian Capital Territory, which reads as follows: In the longer term consideration needs to be given to some breaking down of the current dual system of government and non-government schools, and to the possible integration of non-government schools (particularly those serving similar populations as government schools) with government schools while still allowing the non-government schools to retain the important aspects of their special character. (Report to the Minister for Education and Training on Needs Based Funding for ACT Non-Government Schools, 1992) The fact that virtually no consideration was given to this proposal, and that the Working Party set up to consider the Berkeley Report unreservedly agreed on all of Berkeley's other proposals, highlights two important anomalies that inhibit the development of state-aid policy in Australia, and which George Berkeley by his own admission was seeking to rectify once and for all. The first is to do with the enormously bifurcated (in terms of source) complexity of the schools-funding arrangement in Australia, in which the States provide most of the funding for government schools, and the Commonwealth most of the funding for non-government schools, thus making comparability of figures slippery and a cause for confusion and potential misinterpretation and division by government and non-government school lobbies alike. The second, connected with the first, derives from Berkeley's eagerness as a practising Catholic and a Director-General of Queensland Education to remove inter-sectoral disputes, and the potential for them especially before elections to become standard occurrences in the political and electioneering landscape of Australia. While it could be argued that Berkeley stepped outside his terms of reference in bringing down his Report, his recommendation, particularly in relation to such a senior and experienced educational administrator to consider the integration model of schools, now well-established in New Zealand, could not be dismissed as easily as it had been by the working party set up to receive his Report and comment on it. Accordingly, as part of the research reported here, I travelled to New Zealand to examine in detail the conditions under which non-government schools in general and Roman Catholic schools in particular had been brought into the public sector in 1975 under a special agreement covered by an Act of Integration, which, among other things, protected the special character of each school, and to assess how that arrangement had worked. From this core of information, I developed a series of categories of description, both positive as well as negative, in relation to responses to integrated schools that were put to a variety of persons critically influential in the schools-funding debate in Australia. Whereas initially there had been little or no interest, or otherwise hostility, engendered by the very idea of opening up discussion on a new mode of funding schools in Australia, this new approach, validated by the phenomenographic research method, was able to generate a considerable body of reason and opinion, initially in relation to why participants were so opposed to the idea of integration. Such a strategy enabled me to address through the subdiscipline of Policy Sociology some of the deepest and most heartfelt misgivings of participants in relation to the integration proposal and, in addressing each one of them, to arrive at a series of proposals which would satisfy and eliminate such misgivings, should the general consensus about current ways of funding school education in Australia collapse or in some other way be found to be deficient. The opportunity or danger of such a thing happening has emerged through dramatic recent changes to the mechanism of funding government and non-government schools by the Commonwealth government, called the Enrolment Benchmark Adjustment or EBA, and which in effect has introduced an opportunity-cost factor to rationalise and follow the steady stream of school students away from the government and into the private sector. Additionally, the Commonwealth Coalition government has changed the basis of Commonwealth needs-based funding of non-government schools to exclude private resources as a basis of funding, thus advantaging a category of elite schools hitherto ineligible to receive substantial public subsidies. Meanwhile Australian private schools, an increasing percentage of them new non-Catholic providers, now educate more than thirty percent of Australians as opposed to twenty percent a decade ago, fewer Catholics than ever before attend Catholic schools, and State governments, such as New South Wales, committed to preserving the quality of government schools, which are a ‘States’ right constitutionally, have cut their proportion of subsidies to the wealthier non-government schools in an act of evident retaliation. This development points to the reopening of the state-aid debate, the collapse of a bipartisan schools funding policy, and the need to review the assumptions on which state-aid to Catholic schools, at the very least, was commenced a quarter century ago. As a resolution to this problem, this thesis argues for the incorporation of Catholic systemic schools into an expanded and deregulated Australian educational public sector, as in New Zealand, and addresses in detail, some of the political and constitutional difficulties in doing so.

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