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  • About
  • The Global ETD Search service is a free service for researchers to find electronic theses and dissertations. This service is provided by the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations.
    Our metadata is collected from universities around the world. If you manage a university/consortium/country archive and want to be added, details can be found on the NDLTD website.
1

Zur Integrationsfunktion von Erziehung und Bildung historisch-systematische Studie zu einem "blinden Fleck" der bürgerlichen Gesellschaft und ihrer Pädagogik

Dammer, Karl-Heinz January 2005 (has links)
Zugl.: Duisburg, Essen, Univ., Habil.- Schr., 2005
2

Managing Integration and Immigration : Impellent Question of the European Union

Ladygina, Olga, Kharchuk, Borys January 2008 (has links)
The Immigration issue was, during quite long period of time, a disputable concern within the European territory. European countries, as many others, require a certain degree of qualified immigration, due to developments of the labour market. Along with the issues of immigration and migration, the matter of immigrant’s integration is becoming the focus point of consideration for the European Union as a whole, its single Member States and various other international organizations. The matter of integration has been imbedded in immigration policies because of the discovery that migration of labour throughout Europe, which was considered to be an interim feature for EU’s Member States, has transformed to the permanent one. Another reason is the fear that badly integrated immigrants might become an extraordinary problem for the population’s majority.
3

Differenzierte Integration

Forgo, Katrin January 1996 (has links) (PDF)
Series: EI Working Papers / Europainstitut
4

The goal was to build up an ideal society : ethnic living segregation in Uppsala community

Roba, Abdulatif January 2006 (has links)
<p>Sverige har förändrats som land från en hög immigrationsvåg till ett invandringsland. Den svenska industristillväxten gjorde det möjligt för Sverige att importera extra arbetskraft från andra länder. Arbetarna kom främst från Sydeuropa på grund av att det var brist på arbete i hemlandet. Så småningom förändrades arbetskraftsinvandring till flyktinginvandring, att människor lämnade sitt hemland av olika skäl, till exempel krig. De etablerade sig runt om i Sverige i miljonprogrammets områden. När invandrarna översteg 50 % av majoritetsbefolkningen lämnar de som har ekonomiska resurser invandrartäta områden. Framför allt är det svenskar som lämnar området, på grund av att de inte känner sig hemma. Det skapar etnisk boendesegregation och effekterna av det blir att invandrarna missgynnas, och de får allt svårare att komma in i samhället.</p>
5

Desegregation, integration and the charter of Portland Public Schools /

Doyle, Judith Helene. January 1982 (has links)
Thesis (M.A.)--Oregon State University, 1983. / Typescript (photocopy). Includes bibliographical references (leaves 90-95). Also available online.
6

Integration of pathology teaching : students and faculty perceptions

Kanthan, Rani 21 April 2008
Reports on undergraduate medical education in the recent decade clearly point towards a need for greater integration of content in the medical curriculum. The pedagogy of an integrated curriculum embraces many models of integration, representing a continuum where full integration sits at one end and disciplinebased teaching at the other, with many intermediate steps between the two extremes. A vertically integrated curriculum seeks to bridge the preclinical and clinical divide in content by teaching the content concurrently rather than sequentially, but still retaining discipline boundaries. A horizontally integrated curriculum seeks to further break down the distinctions between the basic and clinical sciences, with the early years of the program focusing on the basic sciences and introducing clinical features into the program wherever possible as part of a gradual shift to a more continued collaborative clinical focus. At the College of Medicine, University of Saskatchewan, the overall redesigned curricular program will be phased in over the next four years of the curriculum, with a greater emphasis towards an integrated approach of the teaching and learning of human disease. In the first year, this has led to the creation of a patchwork quilt teaching style, where a cross disciplinary functional system incorporates elements of the traditional basic science components of anatomy, physiology, embryology, and histology, and an introduction of core general pathological concepts in a vertical and horizontal integrated fashion. <p>The main objective of this research, detailed in Chapter 1, was to investigate the advantages and disadvantages of the two models of horizontal and vertical integration of the reorganized structural teaching of pathology through an analysis of the perceptions of medical educators and first- and second-year students in the undergraduate curriculum at the College of Medicine, and based contextually within a theoretical framework of the newly designed medical curriculum. <p>In this context, the literature review in Chapter 2 focused on four major areas that are the underpinnings of the pedagogy of pathology teaching in the undergraduate medical curriculum: (a) integration concepts in relation to medical education; (b) the practice of pathology teaching in the past, present, and future; (c) theories of curricular integration; and (d) its effects on the student learning environment. This resulted in the development of the pre-research conceptual framework for this study. <p>The in-service monitoring research design for this study included a triangulation of research methodologies using multiple data sources, multiple subjects, and multiple data collection techniques using comparative qualitative and quantitative research inquiry techniques. Data collected from the semi-structured interviews of the medical faculty provided not only an understanding of the educators perceptions towards the integrated curriculum, but also some insight towards their feelings of respect, power, and identity in this new integrative environment. Personal perceptions of fear, apathy, and stress and perceptions regarding accountability and sustainability of this integrative process were also observed as arising from this educational intervention. <p>Quantitative data analysis collected from the first-year student survey questionnaires derived the following grand mean responses with respect to the vertical integration of pathology teachings: student learning satisfaction with integration (3.6); the learning environment (3.8); student engagement (3.3); and student stress (2.9). The grand mean responses to horizontal integration showed a similar trend: student learning satisfaction (3.7); learning environment (4); student engagement (3.5); and student stress (3). Perceptions of the second-year medical students to horizontal integration of pathology teachings were comparable: student learning satisfaction (3.7); learning environment (4.2); student engagement (3.7); and student stress (3.1). A comparison of first- and second-year medical students showed a significant difference (p<0.05) with respect to the domains of student engagement with active independent learning. This difference may, perhaps, be directly related to the level of maturity of the first- versus second-year students, coupled with the receptiveness, awareness, and familiarity of the integration process between the two groups. There were no perceived differences between the horizontal and vertical integrative learning environments. Likewise, inter-modular and inter-system components within the vertical and horizontal integration did not demonstrate any major differences. These results are explored in greater detail in Chapters 4 and 5.<p>One of the noteworthy findings of this study was the statistically significant difference between the perceptions of first-year medical and dental students in both vertical and horizontal integrative environments in many domains, including student learning satisfaction (p<0.001); learning environment (p<0.001); and student engagement (p<0.01). There was no difference in student stress perceptions between the two groups of first-year students. The main theme linking these disparities seemed to be related to a lack of academic and vocational relevance of the undergraduate medical course teachings to the inter-professional composite cohort of dental students. This has led to the creation of an independent course dedicated to first-year dental students. This rapid in-service responsive evaluation thus recognized a major immediate dissatisfaction, resulting in curricular program change. Other curricular changes are underway to address student concerns of ineffective curricular content and time management. An unexpected emergent theme of this study was the recognition of a perception gap between students and faculty medical educators. This is probably nested in complex factors, such as generational learning differences and attitudes towards the learning environment, which are beyond the research scope of this study.<p>In conclusion, the results of this study strongly supports an overall balanced composite curricular design, including facets of horizontal, vertical, and diagonal integration that meet the needs of the student learner and satisfy the expectations of the medical faculty as the best practice plan for the instruction of pathology in the newly designed integrated medical curriculum. As learning is the central function of all education, perhaps the future of successful effective medical educational learning environments are those in which an intergenerational component of students and instructors can engage as true joint partners in curriculum organization to provide the right balance between faculty expectations and student learner needs.
7

The goal was to build up an ideal society : ethnic living segregation in Uppsala community

Roba, Abdulatif January 2006 (has links)
Sverige har förändrats som land från en hög immigrationsvåg till ett invandringsland. Den svenska industristillväxten gjorde det möjligt för Sverige att importera extra arbetskraft från andra länder. Arbetarna kom främst från Sydeuropa på grund av att det var brist på arbete i hemlandet. Så småningom förändrades arbetskraftsinvandring till flyktinginvandring, att människor lämnade sitt hemland av olika skäl, till exempel krig. De etablerade sig runt om i Sverige i miljonprogrammets områden. När invandrarna översteg 50 % av majoritetsbefolkningen lämnar de som har ekonomiska resurser invandrartäta områden. Framför allt är det svenskar som lämnar området, på grund av att de inte känner sig hemma. Det skapar etnisk boendesegregation och effekterna av det blir att invandrarna missgynnas, och de får allt svårare att komma in i samhället.
8

Aspects of Linguistic Integration of Recent Immigrants to Canada: Determinants of English Language Proficiency, Role of English in Labour-market Integration Outcomes and Skills Utilization

Zemlyanukhina, Viktoriya 12 January 2012 (has links)
The thesis explores the determinants of English proficiency as well as its role in labour-market integration outcomes and skills utilization. The Longitudinal Survey of Immigrants to Canada provides the data for the empirical analysis. The introductory chapter offers insight into the recent changes to the Canadian immigration policy as well as immigration trends. This chapter also outlines chapters Two through Six and establishes the conceptual framework that unifies them. Chapter Two introduces two theoretical approaches, human capital theory and macro-level factors of the source and destination countries’ framework. It presents a review of the literature and introduces a theoretical model of linguistic integration that is subsequently tested in Chapters Three and Four. Chapters Three and Four focus on the application of human capital theory and macro-level factors of the source and destination countries’ framework. Chapter Three explores the factors that contribute to the immigrant’s English proficiency upon arrival. Chapter Four investigates the role of human capital and destination country’s macro-level factors in English proficiency four years after migration. The principal empirical results indicate that macro-level factors of the source country are significantly related to the English proficiency at arrival, while macro-level factors of the destination country are significantly related to English proficiency four years after migration. The results also corroborate findings described in the human capital literature aiding comprehension of the relationship between human capital endowments and English proficiency. Chapter Five investigates the role of English proficiency in such labour-market integration outcomes as employment seeking, incidence of employment, and employment within ethnic enclaves. The study finds that English proficiency is associated with higher odds of employment seeking and employment in Canada. It also significantly increases the likelihood of being employed outside ethnic enclaves. Chapter Six integrates human capital theory and language as a dimension of ethnicity framework. The analysis concentrates on the role of English in immigrants’ skills utilization. The principal results add to human capital theory, indicating that English proficiency significantly increases the odds of skills utilization. The findings also reveal that immigrants who speak standard English are more likely to utilize their skills than non-standard English speakers.
9

Aspects of Linguistic Integration of Recent Immigrants to Canada: Determinants of English Language Proficiency, Role of English in Labour-market Integration Outcomes and Skills Utilization

Zemlyanukhina, Viktoriya 12 January 2012 (has links)
The thesis explores the determinants of English proficiency as well as its role in labour-market integration outcomes and skills utilization. The Longitudinal Survey of Immigrants to Canada provides the data for the empirical analysis. The introductory chapter offers insight into the recent changes to the Canadian immigration policy as well as immigration trends. This chapter also outlines chapters Two through Six and establishes the conceptual framework that unifies them. Chapter Two introduces two theoretical approaches, human capital theory and macro-level factors of the source and destination countries’ framework. It presents a review of the literature and introduces a theoretical model of linguistic integration that is subsequently tested in Chapters Three and Four. Chapters Three and Four focus on the application of human capital theory and macro-level factors of the source and destination countries’ framework. Chapter Three explores the factors that contribute to the immigrant’s English proficiency upon arrival. Chapter Four investigates the role of human capital and destination country’s macro-level factors in English proficiency four years after migration. The principal empirical results indicate that macro-level factors of the source country are significantly related to the English proficiency at arrival, while macro-level factors of the destination country are significantly related to English proficiency four years after migration. The results also corroborate findings described in the human capital literature aiding comprehension of the relationship between human capital endowments and English proficiency. Chapter Five investigates the role of English proficiency in such labour-market integration outcomes as employment seeking, incidence of employment, and employment within ethnic enclaves. The study finds that English proficiency is associated with higher odds of employment seeking and employment in Canada. It also significantly increases the likelihood of being employed outside ethnic enclaves. Chapter Six integrates human capital theory and language as a dimension of ethnicity framework. The analysis concentrates on the role of English in immigrants’ skills utilization. The principal results add to human capital theory, indicating that English proficiency significantly increases the odds of skills utilization. The findings also reveal that immigrants who speak standard English are more likely to utilize their skills than non-standard English speakers.
10

Integration of pathology teaching : students and faculty perceptions

Kanthan, Rani 21 April 2008 (has links)
Reports on undergraduate medical education in the recent decade clearly point towards a need for greater integration of content in the medical curriculum. The pedagogy of an integrated curriculum embraces many models of integration, representing a continuum where full integration sits at one end and disciplinebased teaching at the other, with many intermediate steps between the two extremes. A vertically integrated curriculum seeks to bridge the preclinical and clinical divide in content by teaching the content concurrently rather than sequentially, but still retaining discipline boundaries. A horizontally integrated curriculum seeks to further break down the distinctions between the basic and clinical sciences, with the early years of the program focusing on the basic sciences and introducing clinical features into the program wherever possible as part of a gradual shift to a more continued collaborative clinical focus. At the College of Medicine, University of Saskatchewan, the overall redesigned curricular program will be phased in over the next four years of the curriculum, with a greater emphasis towards an integrated approach of the teaching and learning of human disease. In the first year, this has led to the creation of a patchwork quilt teaching style, where a cross disciplinary functional system incorporates elements of the traditional basic science components of anatomy, physiology, embryology, and histology, and an introduction of core general pathological concepts in a vertical and horizontal integrated fashion. <p>The main objective of this research, detailed in Chapter 1, was to investigate the advantages and disadvantages of the two models of horizontal and vertical integration of the reorganized structural teaching of pathology through an analysis of the perceptions of medical educators and first- and second-year students in the undergraduate curriculum at the College of Medicine, and based contextually within a theoretical framework of the newly designed medical curriculum. <p>In this context, the literature review in Chapter 2 focused on four major areas that are the underpinnings of the pedagogy of pathology teaching in the undergraduate medical curriculum: (a) integration concepts in relation to medical education; (b) the practice of pathology teaching in the past, present, and future; (c) theories of curricular integration; and (d) its effects on the student learning environment. This resulted in the development of the pre-research conceptual framework for this study. <p>The in-service monitoring research design for this study included a triangulation of research methodologies using multiple data sources, multiple subjects, and multiple data collection techniques using comparative qualitative and quantitative research inquiry techniques. Data collected from the semi-structured interviews of the medical faculty provided not only an understanding of the educators perceptions towards the integrated curriculum, but also some insight towards their feelings of respect, power, and identity in this new integrative environment. Personal perceptions of fear, apathy, and stress and perceptions regarding accountability and sustainability of this integrative process were also observed as arising from this educational intervention. <p>Quantitative data analysis collected from the first-year student survey questionnaires derived the following grand mean responses with respect to the vertical integration of pathology teachings: student learning satisfaction with integration (3.6); the learning environment (3.8); student engagement (3.3); and student stress (2.9). The grand mean responses to horizontal integration showed a similar trend: student learning satisfaction (3.7); learning environment (4); student engagement (3.5); and student stress (3). Perceptions of the second-year medical students to horizontal integration of pathology teachings were comparable: student learning satisfaction (3.7); learning environment (4.2); student engagement (3.7); and student stress (3.1). A comparison of first- and second-year medical students showed a significant difference (p<0.05) with respect to the domains of student engagement with active independent learning. This difference may, perhaps, be directly related to the level of maturity of the first- versus second-year students, coupled with the receptiveness, awareness, and familiarity of the integration process between the two groups. There were no perceived differences between the horizontal and vertical integrative learning environments. Likewise, inter-modular and inter-system components within the vertical and horizontal integration did not demonstrate any major differences. These results are explored in greater detail in Chapters 4 and 5.<p>One of the noteworthy findings of this study was the statistically significant difference between the perceptions of first-year medical and dental students in both vertical and horizontal integrative environments in many domains, including student learning satisfaction (p<0.001); learning environment (p<0.001); and student engagement (p<0.01). There was no difference in student stress perceptions between the two groups of first-year students. The main theme linking these disparities seemed to be related to a lack of academic and vocational relevance of the undergraduate medical course teachings to the inter-professional composite cohort of dental students. This has led to the creation of an independent course dedicated to first-year dental students. This rapid in-service responsive evaluation thus recognized a major immediate dissatisfaction, resulting in curricular program change. Other curricular changes are underway to address student concerns of ineffective curricular content and time management. An unexpected emergent theme of this study was the recognition of a perception gap between students and faculty medical educators. This is probably nested in complex factors, such as generational learning differences and attitudes towards the learning environment, which are beyond the research scope of this study.<p>In conclusion, the results of this study strongly supports an overall balanced composite curricular design, including facets of horizontal, vertical, and diagonal integration that meet the needs of the student learner and satisfy the expectations of the medical faculty as the best practice plan for the instruction of pathology in the newly designed integrated medical curriculum. As learning is the central function of all education, perhaps the future of successful effective medical educational learning environments are those in which an intergenerational component of students and instructors can engage as true joint partners in curriculum organization to provide the right balance between faculty expectations and student learner needs.

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