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  • About
  • The Global ETD Search service is a free service for researchers to find electronic theses and dissertations. This service is provided by the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations.
    Our metadata is collected from universities around the world. If you manage a university/consortium/country archive and want to be added, details can be found on the NDLTD website.
1

Explaining the relations between culture, structure and agency in lecturers' contribution and non-contribution to Open Educational Resources in a higher education institution

Cox, Glenda January 2016 (has links)
Despite the existence of many successful initiatives to promote the sharing and use of Open Educational Resources (OER), sharing and use of OER is not a widely accepted practice in higher education. The reasons for lecturers' choices on whether or not to contribute OER are poorly understood. This thesis develops a theoretically-based explanation of both why lecturers contribute and why they do not. The thesis addresses the question: How do the relations between culture, structure and agency influence lecturers' contribution and non-contribution of OER in a higher education institution? A mixed methods approach was used to gather quantitative (questionnaires) and qualitative (interviews) data. Fourteen lecturers from the University of Cape Town (UCT) were interviewed (two from each of its seven faculties), seven who had contributed OER and seven who had not. The analysis adopted an Activity Theory framework to highlight the enablers and barriers to contribution present in the institutional system. The Social Realism of Margaret Archer (1995, 2003, 2007a, 2012) was used to explore the power of academics' agency and their internal conversations arising from their personal concerns in deciding on their courses of action. This study illustrates how capturing lecturers' internal conversations and analysing how they think about their social contexts is valuable not only in the context of OER but also as a way of understanding their role as social actors more generally. Analysing the relations between culture, structure and agency in institutions explains why some institutions are slow to change and/or prefer to maintain current practices. At UCT, where institutional culture allows academic freedom of choice and structure supports that choice, it is the academic agents themselves who hold the power of action to contribute or not to contribute OER. Academics have the power to change their practice if it makes sense in terms of their projects, the activities that they are involved in and their concerns. Thus in this context, the long term sustainability of the OER movement rests firmly on the willingness of individual lecturers to share and use OER. By understanding the institutional context in which the individual is placed, OER can be encouraged appropriately
2

Wrangling Open Educational Resources

Cuillier, Cheryl 11 1900 (has links)
Presented at 2014 Arizona Library Association Annual Conference, Scottsdale, AZ / Open educational resources (OER) are teaching and learning materials that are free to use, customize, and share. There’s a goldmine of OER online, but locating them is like trying to herd cattle (or cats). It takes persistence and a knack for tracking down things that are scattered all over. OER range from digital textbooks, lesson plans, and games to assignments, videos, and lab notes. Learn about the benefits of OER, potential barriers, where to find high-quality OER, and how to increase customers’ awareness of them. The target audience for this presentation is anyone who works with K-12 classes, college students, instructors, and lifelong learners.
3

Open Educational Resources (OER) in Sachsen

Follert, Fabiane, Bergert, Aline, Fischer, Helge, Lauber-Rönsberg, Anne, Horlacher, Sebastian 27 March 2018 (has links) (PDF)
Im Kontext der Digitalisierung vollzieht sich an Hochschulen aktuell ein umfassender Transformationsprozess. Gerade im Bereich der Lehre scheinen die Möglichkeiten digitaler Technologien unbegrenzt. Lernmaterialien, bspw. Texte, Bilder, Videos, Online-Kurse sind ubiquitär verfügbar. Doch wie können diese Materialien sinnvoll und legal integriert, genutzt und verbreitet werden? Sog. Open Educational Resources (OER) bieten Möglichkeiten, den aktuellen Herausforderungen – rechtlicher, didaktischer sowie organisatorischer Natur – adäquat zu begegnen und die Potentiale digitaler Bildung nachhaltig zu erschließen: ... [... aus dem Text]
4

Open Educational Resources (OER) in Sachsen: Status Quo – Potentiale – Herausforderungen

Follert, Fabiane, Bergert, Aline, Fischer, Helge, Lauber-Rönsberg, Anne, Horlacher, Sebastian January 2017 (has links)
Im Kontext der Digitalisierung vollzieht sich an Hochschulen aktuell ein umfassender Transformationsprozess. Gerade im Bereich der Lehre scheinen die Möglichkeiten digitaler Technologien unbegrenzt. Lernmaterialien, bspw. Texte, Bilder, Videos, Online-Kurse sind ubiquitär verfügbar. Doch wie können diese Materialien sinnvoll und legal integriert, genutzt und verbreitet werden? Sog. Open Educational Resources (OER) bieten Möglichkeiten, den aktuellen Herausforderungen – rechtlicher, didaktischer sowie organisatorischer Natur – adäquat zu begegnen und die Potentiale digitaler Bildung nachhaltig zu erschließen: ... [... aus dem Text]
5

Idea-Space: A Use Case of Collaborative Course Development in Higher Education

AbuJarour, Safa’a, Pawlowski, Jan, Bick, Markus, Bagucanskyte, Migle, Frankenberg, Anna, Hudak, Raimund, Makropoulos, Constantinos, Pappa, Dimitra, Pitsilis, Vassilis, Pirkkalainen, Henri, Tannhauser, Anne-Christin, Trepule, Elena, Vidalis, Aristedes, Volungeviciene, Airina 26 October 2015 (has links) (PDF)
A key component of Open Education movement are Open Educational Resources (OER), which are defined as any digital objects that are commonly shared in online repositories and can be freely accessed, reused and adapted by a community of users for educational purposes using an open license scheme. This broad definition includes a lot of different artefacts, such as digital learning objects, software tools like wikis or authoring systems, electronic textbooks, and lesson plans. Existing research on OER has focused on how to make digital objects available and re-usable for educators and learners. Currently, there are millions of resources for basically all subjects, education level. However, their adoption has been limited, the consumption of them is passive, and there are still many barriers towards the uptake of OER. Amongst those, are the not-invented-here syndrome and the lack of involvement and recognition of users who feel that they do or cannot contribute appropriately. In our research, we focus on tweaking the steps that are accomplished before having the resources complete and shared. In particular, in situations when ideas are initiated, shaped, and shared with like-minded people in order to create new educational outcomes, such as OER.
6

Measuring the Technical Difficulty in Reusing Open Educational Resources with the ALMS Analysis Framework

Gurell, Seth Michael 14 December 2012 (has links)
The Open Educational Resources (OER) movement was started roughly ten years old (Wiley & Gurell, 2009). Since that time thousands of resources have been produced. Though these resources have been used both for classroom development and for the autodidact, the development of OER was not without problems. Incompatibility between Creative Commons licenses has made revising and remixing two resources difficult, if not impossible (Linksvayer, 2006). Tools to help educators find appropriate educational resources have been necessary but are still nascent. Educators' perceived quality issues have also hampered adoption (Wiley & Gurell, 2009). The result is that resources were only being minimally reused (Wiley, 2009). One possible reason observed for the limited reuse was the barrier of technology. Some resources were easier to view, revise and remix from a technical perspective than others. Hilton, Wiley, Stein, and Johnson (2010) created the ALMS analysis framework to assess the technical openness of an OER. Although the ALMS framework allowed for an assessment of OER, no pilot instrument was reported in the Hilton et al. (2010) article. The framework has not been tested because there is no known rubric with which measurement can occur. Consequently, Hilton et al.'s framework needed to be further developed and tested against a range of open educational resources. This dissertation examined the ALMS analysis, which was previously only a concept, in order to create a concrete framework with sufficient detail and documentation for comparisons to be made among OERs. The rubric was further refined through a Delphi study consisting of experts in the field of OER (n=5). A sample of OERs (n=27) rated by a small group (4) was conducted to determine inter-rater reliability. Intra-class correlation indicated moderate agreement (ICC(2,1) =.655, df=376, 95% CI [.609, .699]). Findings suggested that the degree of technical difficulty in reusing OERs can be measured in somewhat reliable manner. These findings may be insightful in developing policies and practices regarding OER development.
7

Faculty Members' Lived Experiences with Open Educational Resources

Martin, M. Troy 01 August 2018 (has links)
The cost of textbooks has continued to increase, and the financial effect on students in higher education is significant. Numerous studies have been done to learn more about student and faculty perceptions toward Open Educational Resources (OER) use. Recent studies confirm that most instructors would use OER in order to alleviate the financial burden placed on students; however, OER adoption rates do not reflect this belief. In my study I sought to better understand what instructors experience when they search for OER. In this phenomenological study, I interviewed faculty who expressed a desire to use OER and to capture their lived experiences of adopting and adapting OER. I would like to better understand what is working well for these faculty and what challenges exist as they seek to find and adopt OER and identify possible solutions that could improve OER adoption rates. I learned that there is a desire to use OER to reduce the financial burden that textbooks impose on students, but that there is very little understanding on where to find quality OER and tools that are needed to adapt it. Future research may focus on ways to improve the process of finding and customizing OER so that it can be an alternative to expensive textbooks.
8

Faculty Perceptions of Open Educational Resources Quality by Peer Review

Belikov, Olga Maria 01 December 2017 (has links)
In this paper, 936 faculty free response reviews of open textbooks from the Open Textbook Library were analyzed for content and themes. The reviews were completed by faculty members at institutions in the United States and Canada. The textbooks were evaluated regarding their comprehensiveness, content accuracy, relevance longevity, clarity, consistency, modularity, organization structure flow, interface, grammatical errors, and cultural relevance. The results of the reviews found that the across 9360 comments regarding the quality of open textbooks, of these comments 97.3% reflected adequate or exceptional reviews of the textbooks. Faculty often compared the texts to traditional textbooks and in all mentions of comparison, the open textbook were regarded to be of equal or superior quality. The results of this study aid in alleviating concerns regarding quality of Open Educational Resources (OER) and provide peer reviews that faculty who consider adopting these textbooks often request. Limitations of the study and further prescriptions for research regarding OER quality and peer review research have been explored in the study.
9

Viewing the use of open educational resources through a community of practice lens: a case study of teachers' use of the Everything Maths and Everything Science open textbooks

Cartmill, Erna Theresa January 2013 (has links)
This study answers to th e quest ions of why and how the "Everything Maths" and "Everything Science" open textbooks are used, and to what extent a Community of Practice (Wenger, 2006) has formed around the use of these open textbooks, are informed by a case study, comprising of interviews with nine South African high-school teachers using these open educational resources. The Community of Practice theory provided a useful lens through which to code, analyse and view utterances made. Findings indicate that while financial reasons for using the open textbooks are important, pedagogical reasons, of quality and scope of content, are more valued by teachers. Also important are the availability of the open textbooks in a variety of formats, the potential for teachers to develop social learning (Brown, 2008) skills, learners to study independently, the interactive features, and online availability of the open textbooks. A Community of Practice, while not formalised, exists around the use of these open textbooks and can be classified as an Active Community (Kim, Hong and Suh 2012).
10

An Assessment of Utah Resident Incentives and Disincentives for Use of OpenCourseWare (OCW)

Arendt, Anne 01 May 2009 (has links)
This dissertation examines Utah resident views of incentives and disincentives for use of OpenCourseWare (OCW) and how they fit into the theoretical framework of perceived innovation attributes established by Rogers. Rogers identified five categories of perceived innovation attributes, which include relative advantage, compatibility, complexity, trialability, and observability. A survey instrument was developed using attributes that emerged from a Delphi technique with input from experts in the OCW field. The survey instrument was sent to 753 (n = 753) random individuals between 18 and 64 years of age throughout Utah based on information obtained from Alseco Data Group, LLC. Results indicated that the greatest incentives for OCW use were (a) no cost for materials (M = 4.59, SD = .68), (b) having resources available at any time (M = 4.35, SD = .89), (c) pursuing in depth a topic that interests me (M = 4.24, SD = 0.93), (d) learning for personal knowledge or enjoyment (M = 4.22, SD = .93), and (e) materials in an OCW were fairly easy to access and find (M = 4.12, SD = .98). Results indicated that the greatest disincentives for OCW use were (a) there was no certificate or degree awarded (M = 3.28, SD = 1.54), (b) it did not cover my topic of interest in the depth I desired (M = 3.17, SD = 1.31), (c) lack of professional support provided by subject tutors or experts (M = 3.14, SD = 1.25), (d) lack of guidance provided by support specialists (M = 3.09, SD = 1.26), and (e) feeling the material was overwhelming (M = 3.06, SD = 1.31).

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