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  • About
  • The Global ETD Search service is a free service for researchers to find electronic theses and dissertations. This service is provided by the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations.
    Our metadata is collected from universities around the world. If you manage a university/consortium/country archive and want to be added, details can be found on the NDLTD website.
1

A Localisation and Navigation System for an Autonomous Wheel Loader

Lilja, Robin January 2011 (has links)
Autonomous vehicles are an emerging trend in robotics, seen in a vast range of applications and environments. Consequently, Volvo Construction Equipment endeavour to apply the concept of autonomous vehicles onto one of their main products. In the company’s Autonomous Machine project an autonomous wheel loader is being developed. As an ob jective given by the company; a demonstration proving the possibility of conducting a fully autonomous load and haul cycle should be performed. Conducting such cycle requires the vehicle to be able to localise itself in its task space and navigate accordingly. In this Master’s Thesis, methods of solving those requirements are proposed and evaluated on a real wheel loader. The approach taken regarding localisation, is to apply sensor fusion, by extended Kalman filtering, to the available sensors mounted on the vehicle, including; odometric sensors, a Global Positioning System receiver and an Inertial Measurement Unit. Navigational control is provided through an interface developed, allowing high level software to command the vehicle by specifying drive paths. A path following controller is implemented and evaluated. The main objective was successfully accomplished by integrating the developed localisation and navigational system with the existing system prior this thesis. A discussion of how to continue the development concludes the report; the addition of a continuous vision feedback is proposed as the next logical advancement.
2

Motion Control of Rigid Bodies in SE(3)

Roza, Ashton 26 November 2012 (has links)
This thesis investigates the control of motion for a general class of vehicles that rotate and translate in three-space, and are propelled by a thrust vector which has fixed direction in body frame. The thesis addresses the problems of path following and position control. For path following, a feedback linearization controller is presented that makes the vehicle follow an arbitrary closed curve while simultaneously allowing the designer to specify the velocity profile of the vehicle on the path and its heading. For position control, a two-stage approach is presented that decouples position control from attitude control, allowing for a modular design and yielding almost global asymptotic stability of any desired hovering equilibrium. The effectiveness of the proposed method is verified both in simulation and experimentally by means of a hardware-in-the-loop setup emulating a co-axial helicopter.
3

Motion Control of Rigid Bodies in SE(3)

Roza, Ashton 26 November 2012 (has links)
This thesis investigates the control of motion for a general class of vehicles that rotate and translate in three-space, and are propelled by a thrust vector which has fixed direction in body frame. The thesis addresses the problems of path following and position control. For path following, a feedback linearization controller is presented that makes the vehicle follow an arbitrary closed curve while simultaneously allowing the designer to specify the velocity profile of the vehicle on the path and its heading. For position control, a two-stage approach is presented that decouples position control from attitude control, allowing for a modular design and yielding almost global asymptotic stability of any desired hovering equilibrium. The effectiveness of the proposed method is verified both in simulation and experimentally by means of a hardware-in-the-loop setup emulating a co-axial helicopter.
4

Autonomous Path Following Using Convolutional Networks

Schmiterlöw, Maria January 2012 (has links)
Autonomous vehicles have many application possibilities within many different fields like rescue missions, exploring foreign environments or unmanned vehicles etc. For such system to navigate in a safe manner, high requirements of reliability and security must be fulfilled. This master's thesis explores the possibility to use the machine learning algorithm convolutional network on a robotic platform for autonomous path following. The only input to predict the steering signal is a monochromatic image taken by a camera mounted on the robotic car pointing in the steering direction. The convolutional network will learn from demonstrations in a supervised manner. In this thesis three different preprocessing options are evaluated. The evaluation is based on the quadratic error and the number of correctly predicted classes. The results show that the convolutional network has no problem of learning a correct behaviour and scores good result when evaluated on similar data that it has been trained on. The results also show that the preprocessing options are not enough to ensure that the system is environment dependent.
5

Autonomous navigation of a wheeled mobile robot in farm settings

2014 February 1900 (has links)
This research is mainly about autonomously navigation of an agricultural wheeled mobile robot in an unstructured outdoor setting. This project has four distinct phases defined as: (i) Navigation and control of a wheeled mobile robot for a point-to-point motion. (ii) Navigation and control of a wheeled mobile robot in following a given path (path following problem). (iii) Navigation and control of a mobile robot, keeping a constant proximity distance with the given paths or plant rows (proximity-following). (iv) Navigation of the mobile robot in rut following in farm fields. A rut is a long deep track formed by the repeated passage of wheeled vehicles in soft terrains such as mud, sand, and snow. To develop reliable navigation approaches to fulfill each part of this project, three main steps are accomplished: literature review, modeling and computer simulation of wheeled mobile robots, and actual experimental tests in outdoor settings. First, point-to-point motion planning of a mobile robot is studied; a fuzzy-logic based (FLB) approach is proposed for real-time autonomous path planning of the robot in unstructured environment. Simulation and experimental evaluations shows that FLB approach is able to cope with different dynamic and unforeseen situations by tuning a safety margin. Comparison of FLB results with vector field histogram (VFH) and preference-based fuzzy (PBF) approaches, reveals that FLB approach produces shorter and smoother paths toward the goal in almost all of the test cases examined. Then, a novel human-inspired method (HIM) is introduced. HIM is inspired by human behavior in navigation from one point to a specified goal point. A human-like reasoning ability about the situations to reach a predefined goal point while avoiding any static, moving and unforeseen obstacles are given to the robot by HIM. Comparison of HIM results with FLB suggests that HIM is more efficient and effective than FLB. Afterward, navigation strategies are built up for path following, rut following, and proximity-following control of a wheeled mobile robot in outdoor (farm) settings and off-road terrains. The proposed system is composed of different modules which are: sensor data analysis, obstacle detection, obstacle avoidance, goal seeking, and path tracking. The capabilities of the proposed navigation strategies are evaluated in variety of field experiments; the results show that the proposed approach is able to detect and follow rows of bushes robustly. This action is used for spraying plant rows in farm field. Finally, obstacle detection and obstacle avoidance modules are developed in navigation system. These modules enables the robot to detect holes or ground depressions (negative obstacles), that are inherent parts of farm settings, and also over ground level obstacles (positive obstacles) in real-time at a safe distance from the robot. Experimental tests are carried out on two mobile robots (PowerBot and Grizzly) in outdoor and real farm fields. Grizzly utilizes a 3D-laser range-finder to detect objects and perceive the environment, and a RTK-DGPS unit for localization. PowerBot uses sonar sensors and a laser range-finder for obstacle detection. The experiments demonstrate the capability of the proposed technique in successfully detecting and avoiding different types of obstacles both positive and negative in variety of scenarios.
6

Modified Trajectory Shaping Guidance for Autonomous Path Following Control of Platooning Ground Vehicles

Erekson, Ishmaal T. 01 May 2016 (has links)
This thesis proposes a modification of trajectory shaping guidance to provide more accurate path convergence in curved paths. The object of this thesis is to apply this simple guidance law to platooning control to ensure all vehicles in the platoon converge to a desired constant radius path at a desired vehicle separation distance. To show the viability of this new guidance law, it is shown mathematically to be exponentially stable. It is also confirmed through simulations and on ground robots.
7

Linear Parameter Varying Path Following Control of a Small Fixed Wing Unmanned Aerial Vehicle

Guthrie, Kyle Thomas 02 September 2013 (has links)
A mathematical model of a small fixed-wing aircraft was developed through application of parameter estimation techniques to simulated flight test data. Multiple controllers were devised based on this model for path following, including a self-scheduled linear parameter-varying (LPV) controller with path curvature as a scheduling parameter. The robustness and performance of these controllers were tested in a rigorous MATLAB simulation environment that included steady winds and gusts, measurement noise, delays, and model uncertainties. The linear controllers designed within were found to be robust to the disturbances and uncertainties in the simulation environment, and had similar or better performance in comparison to a nonlinear control law operating in an inner-outer loop structure. Steps are being taken to implement the resulting controllers on the unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) testbed in the Nonlinear Systems Laboratory at Virginia Tech. / Master of Science
8

Feedback Control and Nonlinear Controllability of Nonholonomic Systems

Wadoo, Sabiha Amin 17 January 2003 (has links)
In this thesis we study the methods for motion planning for nonholonomic systems. These systems are characterized by nonholonomic constraints on their generalized velocities. The motion planning problem with constraints on the velocities is transformed into a control problem having fewer control inputs than the degrees of freedom. The main focus of the thesis is on the study of motion planning and design of the feedback control laws for an autonomous underwater vehicle: a nonholonomic system. The nonlinear controllability issues for the system are also studied. For the design of feedback controllers, the system is transformed into chained and power forms. The methods of transforming a nonholonomic system into these forms are discussed. The work presented in this thesis is a step towards the initial study concerning the applicability of kinematic-based control on underwater vehicles. / Master of Science
9

Path-following Control of Container Ships

Zhao, Yang 25 July 2019 (has links)
No description available.
10

Campus emergency evacuation traffic management plan

Wu, Di 02 May 2009 (has links)
This thesis was motivated to simulate the evacuation traffic of Mississippi Stated University (MSU) main campus using the Path-Following logic of TSIS/CORSIM and to evaluate a set of traffic management plans. Three scenarios of traffic management plans were developed and tested. A NCT of 123 minutes was projected if evacuate without any plan. In comparison, under a pre-planned traffic management plan the NCT would decrease to 39 minutes. Further, if implement contra flow the NCT would reduce to 21 minutes. If even further adjust the signal timing plans at the university exits a NCT of 20 minutes would be achieved. The sensitivity analysis found that the NCT was sensitive to the CORSIM parameters of free flow speed, time to react to sudden deceleration of lead vehicle and the configuration of driver type, while the effects of discharge headway and start up lost time were not found to be significant.

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