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  • About
  • The Global ETD Search service is a free service for researchers to find electronic theses and dissertations. This service is provided by the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations.
    Our metadata is collected from universities around the world. If you manage a university/consortium/country archive and want to be added, details can be found on the NDLTD website.
21

The five-factor model and the processing of self-relevant information /

Sullivan, Maureen, 1955- January 1998 (has links)
No description available.
22

The importance of cultural identity clarity for the self : an experimental paradigm

Usborne, Esther January 2005 (has links)
No description available.
23

The effects of a laboratory experience on self-acceptance and internal-external control with academically deficient undergraduate students as compared to regular students

McLaughlin, Dennis Alan 03 June 2011 (has links)
The purpose of this study was to investigate, under experimental conditions, the effect of a laboratory experience on self-acceptance and internal-external control with academically deficient college students as compared with Regular students.The ninety subjects in this study were all undergraduate students at Ball State University, Muncie, Indiana. The study was conducted during the spring of 1978.Two sections of the Career and Life Planning course, Counseling Psychology 110, were designated as control groups; and, two other sections were designated as experimental groups. One section of the control group sections contained Academic Opportunity Program students; and, one section contained regular students. The same was true for the experimental group. The experimental groups participated with a vital peer in six one hour laboratory sessions over a six week period. Each week's laboratory session consisted of an experiential exercise and a group discussion. The feedback by the subjects and vital peers utilized guidelines delineated by Brammer.The data collected for each subject was the total score obtained on the Personal Orientation Self-Acceptance Scale and Rotter's Internal-External Scale. Each subject was administered a pre-test and post-test of each instrument.The effects of the treatment were analyzed through the use of a 2 X 2 multivariate analysis of covariance. The pre-test scores were used as a covariate.An F-test was used to test the parallelism of regression hyperplanes. This test-examined the homogeneity of the mean factors; and the results indicated the groups were parallel. The implications for this test indicated that the results could be interpreted directly.Two null hypotheses were stated. The first null hypothesis stated that there would be no significant difference between the A.O.P. subjects and the Regular subjects on the P.O.I. (Sa) Scale. This hypothesis was not rejected at the .05 level. The second hypothesis stated that there would be no significant difference between the A.O.P. subjects and the Regular subjects on the I-E Scale. This hypothesis was not rejected at the .05 level. A significant multivariate F (F=4.43, P.<.05) did occur when comparing all of-the A.O.P. subjects scores and all of the Regular subjects' scores. The univariate F which had an effect on the multivariate F was the P.O.I. (Sa) Scale (F=7.42, P.<.01).It was concluded from this study that:this treatment, with this population, in this time frame and measured by the P.O.I. (Sa) Scale, did not produce significance between the Experimental and Control groups.2. this treatment, with this population, in this time frame and measured by the I-E Scale, did not produce significance between the Experimental and Control groups.3. A.O.P. and Regular subject groups in this study experienced an increased overall mean on the Post P.O.I. (Sa) Scale.4, based on the correlation matrix which was constructed, the P.O.I. (Sa) Scale and the I-E Scale were found to measure separate factors.The results of this study and subjective observations indicated several areas which may be worthy of further exploration.1. This study needs to be replicated where the time periods could be extended to an hour and one-half to provide more time for the individual laboratory experiences.It is recommended that two groups of subjects be used which are not enrolled in the Career and Life Planning class.3. Although the measurement instruments used in this study are frequently used in research, it might be advisable to replicate this study using a different measurement which may be more sensative.4. Since the purpose of this study was to establish a need for further research, this research might be geared towards creating an instrument that does evaluate the effects of a V.P. feedback process.5. A 12 hour marathon group may provide additional and different information than the six week laboratory experience.6. Board games similar to the Ungame and Lifestyle may be added to the laboratory experiences. The subjective responses indicated subject popularity which may influence self-acceptance and/or internal-external control.
24

Effect of teacher self-concept on pupil reading achievement

Dimick, Janice Wirth 03 June 2011 (has links)
The purpose of the study was to investigate relationships between teacher self-concept and pupil reading achievement at the first and second grade levels. Research has verified the relationship between teacher self-concept and pupil self-concept as well as between pupil self-concept and reading achievement. A logical extension would seem to be that teacher self-concept is related to pupil reading achievement. However, this assumption does not appear to have been thoroughly investigated. This study was designed to investigate that relationship.The subjects included 275 pupils and the thirty-two teachers to whom these pupils were assigned in first and second grades. The sample was drawn from four elementary schools in a large midwestern city. Criteria for selection of schools included random assignment of pupils to both first and second grade self-contained classrooms during the 1977-78 and 1978-79 school years.Instruments employed in the study included the Index of Adjustment and Values administered to assess global self-concept of teachers. The discrepancy score (Self-Ideal Self) was used as a basis for classifying teachers into groupings designating range of discrepancy from minimal to maximal. The SRA Assessment Survey Achievement Series, administered to pupils as part of the regular testing program within the school corporation, provided the data on reading achievement.After teacher discrepancy scores were computed, rank ordered, and subdivided into three sections for each grade, these were designated as minimal discrepancy score (Mi DS), medium discrepancy score (Me DS), or maximal discrepancy score (Mx DS). Nine groups representing the nine possible combinations of teachers grouped by discrepancy scores were devised. The reading achievement scores obtained by pupils at the end of second grade were then placed into the appropriate groups based on the designations of their first and second grade teachers. Mean reading achievement scores and standard deviations for pupils in each group were computed.The following null hypotheses were tested:1. No significant relationships exist between teacher self-concept and pupil reading achievement when pupils are identified on the basis of assignment in first and second grades to teachers manifesting varying degrees of discrepancy between self-concept and ideal self-concept.2. No significant differences exist in the reading achievement of pupils having had either a first or second grade Mi DS teacher and pupils who did not.3. No significant differences exist in the reading achievement of pupils having had either a first or second grade Mx DS teacher and pupils who did not.4. No significant differences exist in the reading achievement of pupils having had a Mi DS first grade teacher and pupils who did not.A one-way analysis of variance technique comparing the differences of the means within and between groups was employed. No significant differences were found. Therefore, none of the four null hypotheses was rejected.The most obvious conclusion to be drawn was that teacher self-concept, when assessed by the IAV which provides a global measure, revealed no significant relationship to pupil reading achievement. However, it is possible that several dimensions of self-concept exist and variables demonstrated in the classroom may not have been adequately measured by the self-concept instrument. Also, it is possible that the self-concept's of other, more significant adults such as parents exert a greater influence on children's reading achievement than the self-concept of the teacher. It was recommended that further studies be conducted to investigate these implications.
25

The effect of cognitive self instruction-based career and life planning group treatment on perception of locus of control

Provenzo, Angelo M. 03 June 2011 (has links)
The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of a cognitive self instruction-based career and life planning group intervention on the perception of locus of control. The null hypotheses pertained to the differences in perception of locus of control between treatment and control groups as measured by the Nowicki-Stricklard Locus of Control Scale for Children.Career and life planning is a concept that was designed to help people recognize themselves as active change agents in their own lives. Perception of locus of control has been shown to be influential in determining proactive as well as reactive behaviors. For example, people perceiving an internal rather than an external locus of control are more likely to actively engage in information gathering and use newly acquired information to aid in decision-making. Cognitive self-instruction has been used effectively with various groups to change behaviors. The emphasis of this intervention mode was on developing self-control through the awareness of alternative and more constructive self-talk.The subjects were pre-delinquent high school adolescents from a midwest residential treatment center. Eighty subjects were randomly selected by computer from a population of 131. Through computer randomization, half of the subjects were assigned to a treatment group and half to a control group. The treatment and control groups' experiences all occurred at the residential treatment center.The treatment group sessions were forty-five minutes long and were conducted every third day. A total of six sessions were held. The treatment material and approach emphasized role playing as a technique to examine self-talk that led to negative outcomes and explore alternative selftalk to achieve more satisfying results. The control group maintained their normal daily routine while the treatment group was dismissed to attend the group sessions.Immediately following the last treatment group session and again four weeks later all subjects were administered the Nowicki-Strickland Locus of Control Scale for Children. The instruments were scored and the differences between the average raw scores of the scale were subjected to two univariate analyses of variances, with differences considered significant at the .05 level.The computed F values for the treatment group effects relevant to the post and delayed post-test(F = .16, p < .6897 and F = .04, p < .8373, respectively) were not significant. Therefore, the null hypothesis-- there will be no significant difference between the treatment and control group subjects' mean scores on the Nowicki-Strickland Locus of Control Scale for Children immediately following and four weeks after treatment--was not rejected.Analysis of the data indicated that there was no significant difference in perception of locus of control between the treatment and control groups as measured by the locus of control scale. Therefore, it is concluded that using this six forty-five-minute group intervention mode, the cognitive self-instruction and career and life planning experience did not produce a significant change in perception of locus of control as measured by the aforementioned instrument scale.Comments by the subjects indicated that many positive relationships between the group leaders and the adolescents were established. Five of the six group leaders were completely inexperienced in working with pre-delinquent adolescents. Although they demonstrated the ability to relate well to the subjects, they did experience difficulty and some failure in keeping the group experience closely related to the specific treatment material. More intense training of group leaders regarding the use of the treatment material with this specific population could have been helpful.
26

The effects of bibliotherapy on self-concepts of children and youth in an institutional setting / Bibliotherapy on self-concepts of children and youth in an institutional setting

Garrett, Jerry E. 03 June 2011 (has links)
There is no abstract available for this dissertation.
27

When conscious and non-conscious self-views clash : interpersonal and physiological correlates of discrepant implicit and explicit self-esteem /

Bosson, Jennifer Kathrin, January 2000 (has links)
Thesis (Ph. D.)--University of Texas at Austin, 2000. / Vita. Includes bibliographical references (leaves 100-110). Available also in a digital version from Dissertation Abstracts.
28

Some adjustment correlates of the self and the ideal self concepts as influenced by perceived parental values

Suziedelis, Antanas, January 1957 (has links)
Thesis--Catholic University of America. / Bibliography: p. 38-41.
29

Self-construction of pharmacists through their use of labels for care recipients /

Dawson, Karan. January 2003 (has links)
Thesis (Ph. D.)--University of Washington, 2003. / Vita. Includes bibliographical references (leaves 226-232).
30

The self-concept of foster youth in transition to independent living a descriptive study /

Ensele, Paula. January 2003 (has links)
Thesis (M.S.)--Miami University, Dept. of Family and Child Studies, 2003. / Title from first page of PDF document. Document formatted into pages; contains v, 53 p. Includes bibliographical references (p. 38-41).

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