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  • About
  • The Global ETD Search service is a free service for researchers to find electronic theses and dissertations. This service is provided by the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations.
    Our metadata is collected from universities around the world. If you manage a university/consortium/country archive and want to be added, details can be found on the NDLTD website.
21

Sexuality and gender in Alciphron's Letters of Courtesans

Funke, Melissa 11 1900 (has links)
Current studies on the topic of sexuality in the ancient Greek world tend to favour the active/passive paradigm of understanding sexual relations which was originally proposed in Kenneth Dover's Greek Homosexuality (1978) and Michel Foucault's three volume History of Sexuality (1978, 1985, and 1986). In Dover and Foucault, the sexual behaviour of the classical Athenian male takes primacy, so much so that the reader of either scholar can be left with the impression that the role of the active partner was available only to adult citizen males. Alciphron's Letters of Courtesans (Book 4 of his works) depict a group of desiring female subjects who demonstrate that sexual agency, the assumption of the active role in a sexual relationship, need not be the exclusively masculine phenomenon that Dover and Foucault describe. Letters of Courtesans prove that female sexuality can be portrayed as active and therefore that women in literature can be sexual agents. Additionally, these letters demonstrate the limits of the approaches of Dover and Foucault, that sexuality need not be defined as exclusively active or exclusively passive. By approaching Letters of Courtesans from this perspective, we are able to see that ancient Greek literature includes depictions of active female sexuality that Dover and Foucault overlooked. Letters of Courtesans are therefore a way to challenge and develop the work on ancient sexuality that has followed from these two landmark studies. Because of their fictional nature and their epistolary format, Letters of Courtesans lay bare the process of Alciphron's construction of sexuality and gender. I shall therefore show that Alciphron's Letters of Courtesans are an ideal locus for a discussion of these topics. This study will establish that Letters of Courtesans ought to occupy a place of importance in any discussion of ancient ideas of sexuality and gender.
22

Genetic attributions and gender differences the effect of scientific theories and evaluations of sexual behaviors

Dar Nimrod, Ilan 11 1900 (has links)
Much scientific and media attention has been devoted to the growing body of research into the genetic correlates of human phenomena. However, many of the resulting reports lead to a deterministic interpretation of the role of genes, and involve fundamental misunderstandings of genetics and heredity. Hence, questions arise regarding the ways in which people make sense of the behavioural genetics research they encounter in everyday life. Furthermore, essentialist accounts are often embedded within popular understanding of politically sensitive topics, such as eugenics, race, and sex, and therefore it is important to examine how people comprehend genetic influences on behaviour. In this dissertation, I review current findings regarding the effects of genetic attributions on beliefs, attitudes, and behaviours in the context of the social world. Particular attention is paid to such effects in the context of gender issues. Specifically, in three studies I examine the effects of exposure to scientific theories concerning human sexuality on attitudes towards and evaluations of men’s dubious sexual behaviors. The results indicate that among men exposure to evolutionary psychology arguments leads to more lenient evaluations and judgments of an array of dubious sexual behaviors, compared with exposure to social constructivist arguments. It also seems that men implicitly hold nativist perceptions with regards to male sexuality and promiscuity. The findings were less conclusive among women, with some indication that women are less affected by such exposure as well as less likely to naturally hold a nativist perspective in the context of human sexuality. This empirical research has direct implications for previously suggested intervention programs and adds to the incurrent resurgence of interest in the effects of genetic theories. Finally, I identify areas where further exploration is needed, suggest potential solutions for specific problems, and evaluate related individual and social implications.
23

Ambivalent passion : Pedro Almodóvar's postmodern melodrama

Cromb, Brenda 11 1900 (has links)
This thesis considers the films of Spanish director Pedro Almodóvar as postmodern melodramas. The crux of my argument is that melodrama is known for its expressiveness and its attempt to restore a spiritual element to a post-sacred world, and is used by Almodóvar to make clear the problems and contradictions inherent in the destabilized world of postmodernity. This definition of melodrama draws primarily on the work of Peter Brooks, Christine Gledhill and Linda Williams; it is modified to apply to postmodernism as defined by Jean Baudrillard and Frederic Jameson. The conclusion reached is that Almodóvar is deeply ambivalent about postmodernity. Chapter 2 considers the twin issues of representation and sexuality in Almodóvar’s first six films: Pepi, Luci, Born (Pepi, Luci Born y otras chicas del montón, 1980), Labyrinth of Passions (Laberinto de pasiones, 1982), Dark Habits (Entre tinieblas, 1983), What Have I Done To Deserve This? (Qué he hecho yopor merecer esto!, 1984), Matador (1986), and Law ofDesire (Le ley del deseo, 1987); with a special eye to the representation of sexual violence, it establishes how Almodóvar develops his ambivalent melodramatic imagination. Chapter 3 considers fashion as a discourse and argues that Almodóvar’s next four films use clothing to place different versions of femininity in dialogue, and uses this as a springboard to consider Women on the Verge ofa Nervous Breakdown (Mujeres al borde de un ataque de nervios, 1988), Tie Me Up! Tie Me Down! (I Atame!, 1990), High Heels (Tacones lejanos, 1991), and Kika (1993) as postmodern “women’s pictures.” Chapter 4 considers the appearance of the explicitly political along with the symbolism of the image of the map in The Flower of My Secret (Laflor de rni secreto, 1995), Live Flesh (Came trémula, 1997), and All About My Mother (Todo sobre mi madre, 1999). Chapter 5 uses the metaphor of ghosts to consider the draw of the past in Talk To Her (Hable con ella, 2002), Bad Education (La mala educación, 2004), and Volver (2006), pointing to both the emptiness of the present and the impossibility of returning to that golden past.
24

Asexuality and the feminist politics of ‘not doing it’

Przybylo, Elzbieta Unknown Date
No description available.
25

Die vrou se seksuele disfunksie in die huwelik as uitvloeisel van vroeëre seksuele molestering : 'n pastorale studie / Monnette Fourie

Fourie, Monnette January 2005 (has links)
Sexual violence is an unfortunate everyday occurrence in South Africa. The rising statistics in relation to the rape of children and infants is a strong indication of the desperate need for the counselling mechanisms, counselling and ultimately the prevention in this field. The occurrence of sexual dysfunction in women that were molested as children is as a result very high and within marriages there is often a very high price to be paid. The research question that was applicable in this study is the following: What pastoral guidelines can be offered for the guidance of the molested woman, that is experiencing problems with sexual adjustment within her marriage, to guide her towards a normal sexual relationship within the marriage. The following research procedures were followed in order to answer this question: Chapter 2 investigates the basic concepts of the self esteem of the molested as well as God's plan concerning sexuality and body image. Excerpts of a number of relevant Scriptures were made and the appropriate principles identified. Chapter 3 covers a number of valuable contributions made by some of the supportive sciences in this field of study. A historical overview of the manner in which the church handles the molested woman gives valuable insight. There is a focus placed upon the emotional and physical characteristics of the so-called rape syndrome, typical defence mechanisms and reactions of the victim, aggression, self esteem as well as the body image of the molested person. An in depth look is taken at the emotional and physical characteristics of the so-called rape syndrome, covering issues such as aggression. Chapter 4 is an empirical investigation based on an extensive questionnaire and interviews with a number of respondents. The content of the questions was particularly concentrated on the role of the church, when the molestation took place, memories and/or memory lapses regarding the molestation, functioning within the marriage, sexual dysfunction, where help was sought and found as well as the person's experience of God. From the responses it was deduced that there is much room for improvement in the counselling that the Church offers to the molested iv woman or child. From the information in the preceding chapters certain practice theoretical guidelines, which can be applied when counselling the molested woman or child, could be formulated in Chapter 5. These guidelines can be very useful when counselling the individual as well as when counselling a married couple. In this regard much emphasis is placed on aspects such as guilt, forgiveness, the healing process as well as the powerful medium of prayer as part of the therapeutic process. Inner healing of emotions and memories was also identified as absolutely crucial for such a person to ultimately achieve sexual wellbeing and normal functionality within her marriage / Thesis (M.A. (Pastoral))--North-West University, Potchefstroom Campus, 2005.
26

Sexual discourse: power, knowledge, and the docile body

McLeod, Janelle 13 September 2011 (has links)
Human sexuality is a product of sociocultural and historical constructs. In modern, contemporary society, pornography has emerged as the dominant form of sexual discourse, transforming the human body as an object to be manipulated, shaped, and trained. In this thesis, I will argue that pornography is the vehicle for disciplinary practices that transforms human bodies into sexual bodies that are mere representations of itself. As Michel Foucault describes it in Discipline and Punish (1977), discourse does not function all by itself to produce effects of power, but, rather, the efficacy of discourse is tied to the systematic and calculated use of force by definite agents on definite human bodies. Modern pornographic sexual discourse is only part of a power-knowledge formation that includes subtle and often direct coercion over the body. Men acting as sexual partners extract from pornography a ‘knowledge’ of sexuality that they use to organize their personal domination over women, in order to turn women into docile bodies that learn to adopt various positions or gestures. Even though, if discipline is successful, coercion is minimized, economized, to generate the maximum effect of control through the minimum expenditure of force, a force that never disappears completely. When society is saturated with pornographic representations as a normative standard, which in turn operates as an ideal to which people ‘voluntarily’ aspire, it is only because of the operation of this efficient economy of force, which goes mostly unnoticed. Perceived as a natural, innate human characteristic, sexuality is instead a social construct, where all of the body’s movement, gestures, and attitudes are manipulated, and thus obedient to a pornographic ideal of sexual experience that is limited in its heteronormative expression.
27

Sexual discourse: power, knowledge, and the docile body

McLeod, Janelle 13 September 2011 (has links)
Human sexuality is a product of sociocultural and historical constructs. In modern, contemporary society, pornography has emerged as the dominant form of sexual discourse, transforming the human body as an object to be manipulated, shaped, and trained. In this thesis, I will argue that pornography is the vehicle for disciplinary practices that transforms human bodies into sexual bodies that are mere representations of itself. As Michel Foucault describes it in Discipline and Punish (1977), discourse does not function all by itself to produce effects of power, but, rather, the efficacy of discourse is tied to the systematic and calculated use of force by definite agents on definite human bodies. Modern pornographic sexual discourse is only part of a power-knowledge formation that includes subtle and often direct coercion over the body. Men acting as sexual partners extract from pornography a ‘knowledge’ of sexuality that they use to organize their personal domination over women, in order to turn women into docile bodies that learn to adopt various positions or gestures. Even though, if discipline is successful, coercion is minimized, economized, to generate the maximum effect of control through the minimum expenditure of force, a force that never disappears completely. When society is saturated with pornographic representations as a normative standard, which in turn operates as an ideal to which people ‘voluntarily’ aspire, it is only because of the operation of this efficient economy of force, which goes mostly unnoticed. Perceived as a natural, innate human characteristic, sexuality is instead a social construct, where all of the body’s movement, gestures, and attitudes are manipulated, and thus obedient to a pornographic ideal of sexual experience that is limited in its heteronormative expression.
28

The role of mothers and fathers in the sexuality education of their children: a cross sectional study.

Downie, Jill M. January 1998 (has links)
This study examined the roles of mothers and fathers in the sexuality education of their sons and daughters. Specifically, the research investigated the sexuality knowledge, attitudes and skills of parents to provide education to their pre-school (5 years of age) or year seven (12 years of age) children. Investigation of parents' active participation in the sexuality education of their children and analysis of the factors which determined their involvement was the main objective of the study. The comfort level of parents in their communication with their children and plans for further sexuality education were also considered. Predictive models of sexuality communication were empirically tested and from this a conceptual model was derived which explicates sexuality education in the home.The research involved both a qualitative and quantitative approach to the investigation of parents' contribution to the future sexual health of their children. The first phase of the study involved focus group interviews with 11 parents to discuss their issues and concerns in providing sexuality education. Thematic analysis of the focus groups and review of the literature informed development of the instrument used in the second phase of the study.Face validity of the instrument was established and 371 parents participated in phase two of the study. One hundred and ninety five (195) mothers and 176 fathers responded voluntarily to an anonymous, self-administered questionnaire on their involvement in their child's sexuality education.In the second phase of the study the instrument used included demographic data and general questions regarding sexuality education. A sexuality knowledge and attitude scale was included as well as qualitative questions concerning parents' skills in sexuality education pertaining to three relevant scenarios. Parents' teaching practices, plans for future ++ / sexuality education and a Likert scale of comfort levels was also part of the instrument.Demographic data was consistent with the general population except with respect to income and education which were both higher than expected. Most parents (95%) stated that the home should be the primary place for sexuality education. However, less than half (36%) initiated frequent discussion with their child.Results showed that generally parents had a satisfactory knowledge of sexuality (M= 2 1) but that mothers had more knowledge of sexuality than fathers. Parents' sexuality attitudes tended toward the conservative end of the continuum with fathers more liberal in their attitudes than mothers. The study revealed a small positive correlation between knowledge and attitudes which showed that parents with more knowledge had more liberal attitudes.Mothers' and fathers' skills in sexuality education varied, demonstrating some uncertainty in this aspect of parenting. Most parents (63%) were not appropriate in their response to their child's questions about 'how babies are made', and provided their child with no factual information. Although most parents (76%) had observed their child's 'genital play' the majority (75%) were unaware of their child's 'sex play' behaviours. Parents' skills in responding to their child's genital play and sex play revealed that few (less than 16%) demonstrated complete acceptance of their child's sexual behaviour. Curiously, parents stated that they were generally comfortable when presented with all situations. The findings indicate a need for community based parent education which focuses on enhancing parents' sexuality knowledge, attitudes and skills.Generally small percentages of parents talked to their children about various sexuality topics with the factual topics such as body differences, birth, reproduction and obscene words the most frequently ++ / discussed. Other topics, of a more sensitive or intimate nature, such as contraception, sexually transmissible diseases, abortion, dating, intimate relationships, masturbation, petting and wet dreams were discussed by fewer parents. Not unexpectedly, parents communicated more with their year seven child than their pre-schooler, but the ages at which topics were introduced varied widely. This suggests parents require guidelines for their role which promote early, open and unreserved communication. The timing of sexuality education is also crucial to ensure that sexuality is as integral to the individual as numeracy and literacy and is approached in the same manner.For almost all topics mothers communicated more than fathers for both the pre-school and year seven groups. In contrast to the literature, pre-school mothers communicated equally with both genders and fathers communicated more with their sons, while by year seven, both mothers and fathers communicated more with their sons than their daughters. The topics discussed with sons and daughters appeared to differ with both mothers and fathers discussing physiological and protective issues with daughters and conversing about sexual behaviours with sons. Gender was a significant factor in sexuality education and strategies to promote equality relating to both parents and children are required.Many parents severely overestimated their plans for communicating with their children about sexuality. Most parents of pre-school children planned to discuss all sexuality topics by the time their children were 12 years old, but in reality this was not evident when compared with the year seven group. Few children initiated frequent communication (37%) with their parents but when they did it was usually with their mother.For the overall sample, the communication of sexuality was predicted by parents' attitudes to teaching ++ / sexuality, their perceived preparation, the church as a source of sexual learning and their teaching skills. The predictors however, varied depending on the gender of the parent and the age group being considered and different models explained between 14% and 46% of the variance of communication.No previously published research in Australia has investigated the role of mothers and fathers as sexuality educators. This study has contributed to the increasing body of knowledge in sexuality which aims to educate children more comprehensively for sexual health in adulthood. The conceptual framework derived from the literature and the findings of the study is anticipated to be of benefit to health professionals, school teachers and sexuality educators as they work with parents to promote sexual health.
29

Die vrou se seksuele disfunksie in die huwelik as uitvloeisel van vroeëre seksuele molestering : 'n pastorale studie / Monnette Fourie

Fourie, Monnette January 2005 (has links)
Sexual violence is an unfortunate everyday occurrence in South Africa. The rising statistics in relation to the rape of children and infants is a strong indication of the desperate need for the counselling mechanisms, counselling and ultimately the prevention in this field. The occurrence of sexual dysfunction in women that were molested as children is as a result very high and within marriages there is often a very high price to be paid. The research question that was applicable in this study is the following: What pastoral guidelines can be offered for the guidance of the molested woman, that is experiencing problems with sexual adjustment within her marriage, to guide her towards a normal sexual relationship within the marriage. The following research procedures were followed in order to answer this question: Chapter 2 investigates the basic concepts of the self esteem of the molested as well as God's plan concerning sexuality and body image. Excerpts of a number of relevant Scriptures were made and the appropriate principles identified. Chapter 3 covers a number of valuable contributions made by some of the supportive sciences in this field of study. A historical overview of the manner in which the church handles the molested woman gives valuable insight. There is a focus placed upon the emotional and physical characteristics of the so-called rape syndrome, typical defence mechanisms and reactions of the victim, aggression, self esteem as well as the body image of the molested person. An in depth look is taken at the emotional and physical characteristics of the so-called rape syndrome, covering issues such as aggression. Chapter 4 is an empirical investigation based on an extensive questionnaire and interviews with a number of respondents. The content of the questions was particularly concentrated on the role of the church, when the molestation took place, memories and/or memory lapses regarding the molestation, functioning within the marriage, sexual dysfunction, where help was sought and found as well as the person's experience of God. From the responses it was deduced that there is much room for improvement in the counselling that the Church offers to the molested iv woman or child. From the information in the preceding chapters certain practice theoretical guidelines, which can be applied when counselling the molested woman or child, could be formulated in Chapter 5. These guidelines can be very useful when counselling the individual as well as when counselling a married couple. In this regard much emphasis is placed on aspects such as guilt, forgiveness, the healing process as well as the powerful medium of prayer as part of the therapeutic process. Inner healing of emotions and memories was also identified as absolutely crucial for such a person to ultimately achieve sexual wellbeing and normal functionality within her marriage / Thesis (M.A. (Pastoral))--North-West University, Potchefstroom Campus, 2005.
30

Male Convict Sexuality in the Penal Colonies of Australia, 1820-1850

Gilchrist, Catie January 2004 (has links)
This thesis explores the moral and sexual anxieties produced by the transportation of male convicts to the penal colonies of Australia. My aims are twofold. First, this study argues that male sexuality lay at the heart of penal and colonial political discourse. The moral anxieties this both reflected and produced directly informed the penal administration of the convict population. This was implicit in the ways that convict bodies were ordered, surveilled, disciplined and accommodated. In this analysis the sexual and behavioural management of male prisoners is considered to be a fundamental dynamic within contemporary perceptions of criminal reformation. Second, this thesis examines the ways that these moral concerns permeated the wider colonial society. Free British settlers took their cultural cargo with them to the colonies. In the context of the penal colonies, they also had to negotiate the specific cultural and social implications of transportation. The moral concerns of colonial society were often played out around the politics of imperial transportation. This is examined through a consideration of the cultural meanings of colonial discourse and the many tensions that lay beneath it. During the slow transition from penal colony to respectable free society, colonists utilised and manipulated their moral and cultural anxieties in a number of political ways. This thesis argues that the moral and sexual anxieties of colonial society were both real and imagined. They informed a variety of discourses that linked the colonial periphery with the metropolitan centre in a relationship that was reciprocal but also antagonistic.

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