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  • About
  • The Global ETD Search service is a free service for researchers to find electronic theses and dissertations. This service is provided by the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations.
    Our metadata is collected from universities around the world. If you manage a university/consortium/country archive and want to be added, details can be found on the NDLTD website.
31

An investigation of reputation syndromes associated with peer rejection in childhood /

Rich, Christopher Knox January 1976 (has links)
No description available.
32

The Relation Between the Sociability of Parents and the Social Success of their Children in School

Patrick, Flora LaRue January 1940 (has links)
The purpose of this study is to determine what relation, if any, exists between the social interests and participation of parents and the social success of their children in elementary school. An additional purpose is to determine the relationship between occupational status of parents and social success of children.
33

An Experimental Investigation of the Relationship Between Perception of Parental Acceptance and Social Acceptability of Adolescents

Throp, Thomas Richard January 1955 (has links)
The purpose of this study is twofold. One is that of developing an instrument for determining a child's concept of how he is thought of by his mother and his father; in other words, a method of measuring parental acceptance as it is perceived by the child, himself. The development of this instrument will be discussed in Chapter IV. The second purpose of this study is that of determining whether or not there is any significant relationship between the child's perception of parental acceptance and the social acceptability of the child, as measured by a sociometric instrument.
34

An Investigation of Attitudes and Reactions of Preschool and School-Age Children Toward a Child Speaker with Stuttering Patterns

Wells, Clare Denise 08 1900 (has links)
This study compared the attitudes and reactions of thirty preschool and thirty school-age children toward a child speaker with stuttering patterns. An introduction reviewed previous literature on defining stuttering, adults' and children's attitudes toward stuttering, and the stutterer's personality traits. The children of the study rated either a normal child speaker or a child speaker with stuttering patterns on a sociometric scale. In a giving task, the children were asked to choose one of the speakers. Statistical testing revealed that the school-age children had a more negative attitude toward and less social acceptance of the child speaker with stuttering patterns than the normal-speaking child. Implications for the speech-language pathologist in treating the child stutterer are discussed.
35

On the Importance of Being Fun: Over Time Associations Between Perceptions of Fun and Changes in Peer Preference and Popularity

Unknown Date (has links)
In this short- term longitudinal study (N=428), the unique predictive association between the positive peer nominated characteristic of being fun and peer status (peer preference and popularity) was assessed in a sample of fourth through sixth grade students. Concurrent hierarchical regression analyses and longitudinal structural equation modeling analyses found that peer nominated fun positively predicted preference and popularity, after accounting for the contribution of predictors potentially confounded with being fun, such as prosocial behavior, academic achievement, relational aggression, and physical aggression. The longitudinal association between fun and preference was qualified by grade in school, such that being fun predicted increases in preference for younger children but not for older children. There were bidirectional associations between peer status and fun; fun predicted increases in peer preference and popularity, but peer preference and popularity also predicted later increases in fun. The findings point to the need to expand existing conceptualizations of the antecedents of peer status beyond known predictors and to examine the developmental shifts in the landscape of children’s peer interactions that make certain characteristics more desirable at different ages. / Includes bibliography. / Dissertation (Ph.D.)--Florida Atlantic University, 2016. / FAU Electronic Theses and Dissertations Collection
36

Sustainability challenges facing community radio: a comparative study of three community radio stations in Limpopo Province.

Muswede, Tavhiso January 2009 (has links)
Thesis (M.A) (Media Studies)--University of Limpopo,2009. / This is a qualitative comparative study on sustainability challenges facing the community radio sector in Limpopo Province, South Africa. The study explores and determines community radio’s social acceptance to target communities, identifies its fundraising and marketing strategies, and evaluates its governance and management policies. The research draws from theories of community development and mass communication, namely: development theory and participant media theory. Detailed literature review, focus group discussion, in-depth interviews, and analyses of archival records and institutional documents were used as research methods. The case study purports that the quality of a community radio service is often a product of its resources. Furthermore, it appreciates the open access approach to broadcasting as fulfilling the original and moral imperative of community radio. However, it views sustainability issues, more specifically financial resources, as having far reaching effects on the sector’s independence and the ability to fulfill its functions. Often in community radio, the concept of sustainability tends to be narrowly used to refer to financial sustainability alone. The conclusions drawn from the comparative study of three community radio stations, namely: Botlokwa, Mohodi and Radio Turf reveal that a comprehensive approach to sustainability should recognise the role of social, organisational and financial aspects of the medium. Despite marked progress with respect to social acceptance, more innovative marketing and fundraising strategies, appropriate organisational and management policies in the sector are essential. In their absence, community radio continues to lack access to a fair share of resources and can barely raise funds to meet its obligations. Consequently, poor performance in community radio is largely attributable to sustainability challenges, particularly in rural communities where resources are often scarce as compared to urban centres. / Not listed
37

Bounded set trends and conformity to group norms at a non-denominational church

Durham, Jennifer M. January 2005 (has links)
Thesis (D. Min.)--Ashland Theological Seminary, 2005. / Abstract. Includes bibliographical references (leaves 146-151).
38

Social acceptance of antimalarial strategies in Uganda

Helldorff, Hedvig January 2008 (has links)
<p>According to the World Health Organization(WHO) the most efficient and cost-effective strategies in the global fight of malaria are the Indoor Residual Spraying (IRS) and the Insecticide Treated Nets ITNs). However, since the strategies include the use of synthetic insecticides, WHO reports that they sometimes meet opposition in the society. In a Global Malaria Programme report from 20061, WHO describes that concerns in the community regarding the safety of the IRS hinder its effective implementation. WHO states that the social acceptability of ITNs2 has to increase. This study aims at investigating if and where in the Ugandan society the antimalarial strategies meet opposition. The study analyzes whether authorities, non-governmental organizations and caretakers in one region in Uganda reject the antimalarial strategies recommended by WHO. The aim is further to investigate where focus should be put in order to meet the</p><p>opposition (if any) to current strategies and thus facilitate the implementation of the strategies. The methodology used is an empirical approach based on interviews with officials at authorities, representatives of non-governmental organizations (NGOs) and caretakers in the slum areas in Kawempe Division, which is an area highly exposed to malaria, in Uganda. The results show that the authorities and the NGOs in this study accept the current strategies but believe that they are not fully accepted by caretakers. Further, the authorities and the NGOs point out that current strategies, mainly IRS, meet great resistance among politicians and within the agricultural and environmental sector. Nevertheless, the majority of the caretakers in the interviews does accept the strategies and give other reasons for not having them implemented in their houses. Many of the households do not have the money neither to buy the ITNs nor to have the IRS implemented in their houses. Thus, this study implies that the opposition to the current strategies is not among authorities, NGOs or caretakers but in the political, environmental and agricultural</p><p>sphere. In order to fight malaria in the study area, WHO and stakeholders have to work with the change of attitudes among politicians and stakeholders within the environmental and agricultural sector in Uganda. They also have to provide poor households with ITNs or IRS for free, since lack of money is the reason for the studied group of caretakers not having the recommended strategies implemented in their houses.</p>
39

A qualitative study on a supportive group for post-secondary students with and without disabilities /

Wu, Chui-ying, Joyce. January 2006 (has links)
Thesis (M. Soc. Sc.)--University of Hong Kong, 2006.
40

Social acceptance of antimalarial strategies in Uganda

Helldorff, Hedvig January 2008 (has links)
According to the World Health Organization(WHO) the most efficient and cost-effective strategies in the global fight of malaria are the Indoor Residual Spraying (IRS) and the Insecticide Treated Nets ITNs). However, since the strategies include the use of synthetic insecticides, WHO reports that they sometimes meet opposition in the society. In a Global Malaria Programme report from 20061, WHO describes that concerns in the community regarding the safety of the IRS hinder its effective implementation. WHO states that the social acceptability of ITNs2 has to increase. This study aims at investigating if and where in the Ugandan society the antimalarial strategies meet opposition. The study analyzes whether authorities, non-governmental organizations and caretakers in one region in Uganda reject the antimalarial strategies recommended by WHO. The aim is further to investigate where focus should be put in order to meet the opposition (if any) to current strategies and thus facilitate the implementation of the strategies. The methodology used is an empirical approach based on interviews with officials at authorities, representatives of non-governmental organizations (NGOs) and caretakers in the slum areas in Kawempe Division, which is an area highly exposed to malaria, in Uganda. The results show that the authorities and the NGOs in this study accept the current strategies but believe that they are not fully accepted by caretakers. Further, the authorities and the NGOs point out that current strategies, mainly IRS, meet great resistance among politicians and within the agricultural and environmental sector. Nevertheless, the majority of the caretakers in the interviews does accept the strategies and give other reasons for not having them implemented in their houses. Many of the households do not have the money neither to buy the ITNs nor to have the IRS implemented in their houses. Thus, this study implies that the opposition to the current strategies is not among authorities, NGOs or caretakers but in the political, environmental and agricultural sphere. In order to fight malaria in the study area, WHO and stakeholders have to work with the change of attitudes among politicians and stakeholders within the environmental and agricultural sector in Uganda. They also have to provide poor households with ITNs or IRS for free, since lack of money is the reason for the studied group of caretakers not having the recommended strategies implemented in their houses.

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