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  • About
  • The Global ETD Search service is a free service for researchers to find electronic theses and dissertations. This service is provided by the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations.
    Our metadata is collected from universities around the world. If you manage a university/consortium/country archive and want to be added, details can be found on the NDLTD website.
1

Religion, Spirituality, HIV Symptoms and Health Related Quality of Life in HIV Infected African American Women Recovering from Substance Abuse

Jané, Dulce Maria 16 December 2010 (has links)
The aim of this study was to evaluate the potential contribution of religious involvement, spiritual well-being, existential well-being and HIV-related symptoms to health-related quality of life in HIV-infected African American women recovering from substance abuse. The study also examined whether religious and spiritual variables served as potential moderators between HIV symptoms and health-related quality of life. This study relied on data obtained as part of a larger longitudinal investigation of the effectiveness of Structural Ecosystems Therapy (SET) for HIV infected women in substance abuse recovery. A total of 175 participants were recruited from regional residential and outpatient clinics. The sample in this study included 99 African American women who had completed the required baseline assessment. It was hypothesized that religious involvement, spiritual well-being and existential well-being would be positively associated to various health-related quality of life indicators (i.e., physical functioning, social functioning, mental health functioning and health distress). On the other hand, HIV symptoms were hypothesized to be inversely related to the health-related quality of life indicators. Religious involvement, spiritual well-being and existential well-being were posited to moderate the relationship between HIV symptoms and the health-related quality of life indicators. Findings from the multivariate analysis of variance showed existential well-being to be significantly related to mental health functioning and health distress and HIV symptoms to be significantly related to mental health functioning and physical functioning. Results from the regression analyses also showed that after controlling for age, both existential well-being and HIV symptoms were significantly related to mental health functioning. Results suggest that increased symptom frequency is significantly associated with worse mental health while higher levels of existential well-being are significantly related to better mental health. No evidence was found in support of the hypothesized moderating role of religious involvement, spiritual well-being and existential well-being between HIV symptoms and health-related quality of life indicators. Research and clinical implications of these findings are discussed.
2

The impact of full-time Christian ministry on the spiritual well-being of the ministering family's children : a pastoral study / P. Murray

Murray, Petronella January 2009 (has links)
This research focuses on the problem field of those called to full-time Christian work and specifically how the interpretation and implementation thereof has an impact on the spiritual well-being of the adolescents growing up in this context. The purpose of the study is to identify the challenges parents and adolescents experience and to minimise the negative impact thereof through praxis theoretical guidelines for spiritual nurturing. A Biblical perspective on calling to full-time Christian ministry as well as an understanding of the God-given mandate to parents to nurture the spiritual well-being of their family, forms the basis of this research. Insight into the problem field was gained through empirical research conducted by means of structured and unstructured interviews. Adolescents whose parents are presently in full-time Christian work were interviewed by means of a questionnaire as well as an in-depth conversation. Interviews with adults who had grown up in context of full-time Christian work during the 1970's and 1980's gave insight into the long-term impact on spiritual well-being. Parents in full-time Christian work, who are raising adolescents, shared their perspectives and challenges in interviews. Research in the social sciences confirmed the Biblical perspective that the family is the best environment for both adults and children to grow to maturity. Integration of all the dimensions of life is essential for the process growth within the family and is an ongoing dynamic process which continually requires observation, evaluation and change. This study concludes by offering guidelines to parents in full-time Christian work on spiritual nurturing of their family as the primary focus of their ministry. The result of this approach is that the family is restored to its God-ordained position as the epicentre of ministry. Just as Abraham's family was chosen by God to reveal Him to the nations, so, the family in full-time Christian work is called, as a unit, to participate in God's redemption the world. / Thesis (M.A. (Pastoral))--North-West University, Potchefstroom Campus, 2010.
3

The impact of full-time Christian ministry on the spiritual well-being of the ministering family's children : a pastoral study / P. Murray

Murray, Petronella January 2009 (has links)
This research focuses on the problem field of those called to full-time Christian work and specifically how the interpretation and implementation thereof has an impact on the spiritual well-being of the adolescents growing up in this context. The purpose of the study is to identify the challenges parents and adolescents experience and to minimise the negative impact thereof through praxis theoretical guidelines for spiritual nurturing. A Biblical perspective on calling to full-time Christian ministry as well as an understanding of the God-given mandate to parents to nurture the spiritual well-being of their family, forms the basis of this research. Insight into the problem field was gained through empirical research conducted by means of structured and unstructured interviews. Adolescents whose parents are presently in full-time Christian work were interviewed by means of a questionnaire as well as an in-depth conversation. Interviews with adults who had grown up in context of full-time Christian work during the 1970's and 1980's gave insight into the long-term impact on spiritual well-being. Parents in full-time Christian work, who are raising adolescents, shared their perspectives and challenges in interviews. Research in the social sciences confirmed the Biblical perspective that the family is the best environment for both adults and children to grow to maturity. Integration of all the dimensions of life is essential for the process growth within the family and is an ongoing dynamic process which continually requires observation, evaluation and change. This study concludes by offering guidelines to parents in full-time Christian work on spiritual nurturing of their family as the primary focus of their ministry. The result of this approach is that the family is restored to its God-ordained position as the epicentre of ministry. Just as Abraham's family was chosen by God to reveal Him to the nations, so, the family in full-time Christian work is called, as a unit, to participate in God's redemption the world. / Thesis (M.A. (Pastoral))--North-West University, Potchefstroom Campus, 2010.
4

Intimate Partner Violence And Depressive Symptoms: A Moderated Mediation Model Of Religious Coping And Spiritual Well-Being In African American Women

Enkhtor, Dulamdary 01 August 2012 (has links)
Religious coping and spiritual well-being were found to be culturally important resilience factors for African American women suffering from abuse and depressive symptoms. This investigation aimed to investigate whether: (1) spiritual well-being and its two components of existential and religious well-being mediate the Intimate Partner Violence (IPV)-Depressive Symptoms (DS) link; (2) positive and negative religious coping moderate the IPV-DS association; and (3) the mediating effect of spiritual well-being in the IPV-DS link is moderated by level of religious coping (i.e., moderated mediation). The study utilized data from 208 low income, suicidal and abused African American women, ages 18-55. Only the existential component of spiritual well-being was found to fully mediate the IPV-DS link. This indirect effect weakened at higher levels of negative religious coping. As predicted, higher levels of negative religious coping were associated with higher levels of depressive symptoms. Surprisingly, higher levels of negative religious coping were also associated with increases in existential well-being which, in turn, led to decrease in depressive symptoms. The findings underscore the importance of addressing existential well-being and religious coping in clinical interventions and in training for mental health professionals. Clinical and research implications of these findings are discussed and future directions recommended.
5

Hope and quality of life in hospice patients with cancer

Brown, Cynthia 01 June 2005 (has links)
Hope is considered to have a positive influence upon health. Cancer patients may enter hospice care after a rigorous course of medical treatment, having hoped for a cure or long remission. While the hope for cure is important, hope is no less important at the end of life when the goal of care is quality of life. This study examined the relationship between hope and quality of life in hospice patients with cancer. Thirty-one patients with cancer, who were alert, oriented, living with a caregiver, and aware of their diagnosis were sampled from a hospice program. The instruments used were the Herth Hope Index (HHI) and the Hospice Quality of Life Index (HQLI). The HHI total scores and the HQLI total scores were significantly positively correlated (r = .356; p = .049). This finding suggests that hope is a different concept than quality of life but that these concepts are related. A high level of hope (mean of 42.84 out of a possible 48) was maintained by subjects. The HQLI subscale of social/spiritual well-being and the total HHI scores were also positively correlated (r = .51; p = .003) suggesting that hope can be influenced by this aspect of quality of life which includes a relationship with God, support from family, friends and healthcare providers, and spiritual support from the healthcare team. The findings of this study underscore the importance of the healthcare provider in promoting hope at the end of life, and suggests that hope is not taken away by admission into a hospice program.
6

Predictors of Quality of Life in Patients with Cutaneous T cell Lymphoma

Deaver, Darcie Marie 01 January 2013 (has links)
Abstract Cutaneous T cell lymphoma (CTCL) is a rare, incurable, chronic disease accounting for approximately 3% of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma diagnoses every year. Patients with CTCL have skin lesions that can vary in severity putting patients at risk for developing symptoms that may impair their quality of life (QOL). The disease burden can lead to increased depressive symptoms, fatigue distress, and anxiety that the disease may be worsening. Seventy-five participants agreed to take part in an exploratory, prospective study to evaluate depressive symptoms, anxiety, fatigue distress, and spirituality as predictors of QOL in CTCL patients. Demographic variables including stage of disease, ethnicity, age, gender, marital status, level of education, and time since diagnosis, were also included in the analyses to assess for relationships. Bivariate correlations, t-tests, and regression analyses were conducted to assess for relationships among the predictor variables and QOL. The analyses revealed that the proposed model explained 64% of the variance, and depressive symptoms (t= -2.4, p= 0.020) and stage of disease (t= -3.0, p= 0.004) significantly predicted the QOL of CTCL patients. Evaluating for predictors that influence the QOL helps us to better understand the needs of the patients afflicted with CTCL. The importance of studying the QOL of the CTCL patients lies in the fact that nurses can assist in helping patients alleviate some of the symptoms they experience, thereby improving their QOL. Further study is warranted in developing interventions to assist in the preservation of QOL.
7

Evaluation of an Iyengar yoga intervention for women with cancer

Duncan, Meghan D 30 August 2007
Introduction: Cancer poses a substantial burden on the health of Canadians. Although advancements in screening and treatment have reduced, cancer-related morbidity and quality of life remain important concerns throughout cancer treatment and survivorship. <p>Purpose: This study examined the impact of Iyengar yoga on quality of life and other cancer-related symptoms among people with cancer. <p>Methods: All individuals registered for the Fall 2006 and Winter 2007, 10-week Iyengar yoga programs, offered by CancerCare Manitoba through private donations, were invited to participate in the study. Participants were asked to complete standard self-report questionnaires and participant diaries at baseline, week-5, week-10, and 6 weeks following the last class. The interventions impact on study outcomes were determined using repeated measures ANOVAs and paired samples t-tests. Six participant interviews and a review of participant diaries were conducted and analyzed using categorical aggregation and direct interpretation to identify other relevant issues as raised by participants and to document any negative effects of the program.<p>Results: Nineteen female participants completed the yoga intervention. The mean age of the sample was 50 years and the majority self-identified as Caucasian. Approximately one third had breast cancer and 63% were undergoing treatment for cancer at baseline. Results from the questionnaires showed statistically significant improvements in quality of life, mood disturbance, spiritual well-being, anxiety, nausea, pain, participants most bothersome symptom at baseline, and trait anxiety. Results from the interviews and participant diaries showed that participants experienced increases in social support, relaxation, mental concentration, and in flexibility, strength, and mobility in problem areas. Participants also expressed that their Iyengar yoga practice was empowering and supported their need to take an active role in their health and take a holistic approach to care. It was suggested that Iyengar yoga might contribute to the benefits reported through an ability to facilitate the development of coping skills or mindfulness.<p>Conclusions: The Iyengar yoga program for people living with cancer offered by CancerCare Manitoba can be considered a complex, multi-level, multi-modal intervention. Although, due to design limitations, neither causality nor a dose-response relationship between the Iyengar yoga intervention and the improvements in cancer-related outcomes could be inferred, the present study lends support to the assertion that Iyengar yoga is beneficial to the well-being of those living with cancer.
8

Evaluation of an Iyengar yoga intervention for women with cancer

Duncan, Meghan D 30 August 2007 (has links)
Introduction: Cancer poses a substantial burden on the health of Canadians. Although advancements in screening and treatment have reduced, cancer-related morbidity and quality of life remain important concerns throughout cancer treatment and survivorship. <p>Purpose: This study examined the impact of Iyengar yoga on quality of life and other cancer-related symptoms among people with cancer. <p>Methods: All individuals registered for the Fall 2006 and Winter 2007, 10-week Iyengar yoga programs, offered by CancerCare Manitoba through private donations, were invited to participate in the study. Participants were asked to complete standard self-report questionnaires and participant diaries at baseline, week-5, week-10, and 6 weeks following the last class. The interventions impact on study outcomes were determined using repeated measures ANOVAs and paired samples t-tests. Six participant interviews and a review of participant diaries were conducted and analyzed using categorical aggregation and direct interpretation to identify other relevant issues as raised by participants and to document any negative effects of the program.<p>Results: Nineteen female participants completed the yoga intervention. The mean age of the sample was 50 years and the majority self-identified as Caucasian. Approximately one third had breast cancer and 63% were undergoing treatment for cancer at baseline. Results from the questionnaires showed statistically significant improvements in quality of life, mood disturbance, spiritual well-being, anxiety, nausea, pain, participants most bothersome symptom at baseline, and trait anxiety. Results from the interviews and participant diaries showed that participants experienced increases in social support, relaxation, mental concentration, and in flexibility, strength, and mobility in problem areas. Participants also expressed that their Iyengar yoga practice was empowering and supported their need to take an active role in their health and take a holistic approach to care. It was suggested that Iyengar yoga might contribute to the benefits reported through an ability to facilitate the development of coping skills or mindfulness.<p>Conclusions: The Iyengar yoga program for people living with cancer offered by CancerCare Manitoba can be considered a complex, multi-level, multi-modal intervention. Although, due to design limitations, neither causality nor a dose-response relationship between the Iyengar yoga intervention and the improvements in cancer-related outcomes could be inferred, the present study lends support to the assertion that Iyengar yoga is beneficial to the well-being of those living with cancer.
9

Exploring attitudes of University students towards seeking psychological counselling

Lawrence, Michelle January 2009 (has links)
Magister Psychologiae - MPsych / Student counselling services, typically located within a holistic developmental approach, aim to render comprehensive student services to service users in relation to their psychological, social,educational and spiritual well-being. However, a number of cognitive and affective barriers reportedly reduce the likelihood of young people at universities seeking professional psychological help for personal-emotional problems. Accordingly, the aim of this study, which is located within the Theory of Reasoned Action, was to explore students’ attitudes towards utilising student counselling services, as well as their interpretations of the influence of age, gender and education on their attitudes and self-rated knowledge regarding seeking psychological help. The study thereby attempts to provide an understanding of the factors that influence help-seeking behaviours in university students. The research sample consisted of twenty nine students from the Cape Peninsula University of Technology. The data was collected through focus group discussions, which were conducted using an open-ended and participantcentred approach to the discussion. The qualitative approach of the study was informed by the theory of social phenomenology. Data gathered from the focus group discussions was thematically analysed. The results suggest that attitudes have a potentially important influence on intentions to seek out psychological counselling. Findings show that students feel shame and guilt when they are struggling psychologically and as a result avoid seeking psychological intervention for fear of being negatively stigmatised. The study revealed that education around mental health disorders and the management thereof was crucial in order for them to be demystified and de-stigmatised, and to facilitate openness in the sharing of these problems, and society’s understanding and acceptance of people experiencing psychological disorders. Results also indicate that there is a shift taking place in these attitudes, and suggest ways in which this change can be further facilitated, such as the utilisation of peer helpers who could play a key role in facilitating and reinforcing help seeking behaviour. The outcomes of the study may further contribute to informing universities’ goal to provide accessible, quality and effective development and support services to its students.
10

Reactions of psychotherapists in training to religious questions

Hutchinson, Geoffrey 05 1900 (has links)
This project investigated the spiritual well-being (SWB) of psychotherapists in training and their physiological reactions to religious questions posed by a mock client. Electrodermal activity served as an index of physiological arousal interpreted as anxiety. Thirteen psychotherapists in training at the University of North Texas were recruited. They participated in a simulated intake session with a mock client who asked the psychotherapist neutral questions, personal-other questions (POQs), and personal-religious questions (PRQs). It was discovered that the level of SWB did not affect subjects' anxiety responses to PRQs. There also was no difference in subjects' anxiety responses for POQs between high and low SWB therapists. However, psychotherapists did experience some anxiety associated with questions related to their counseling experience and expertise.

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