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  • About
  • The Global ETD Search service is a free service for researchers to find electronic theses and dissertations. This service is provided by the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations.
    Our metadata is collected from universities around the world. If you manage a university/consortium/country archive and want to be added, details can be found on the NDLTD website.
1

The experiences and benefits gained by tourists visiting socio-industrial heritage attractions

McIntosh, Alison Jane January 1997 (has links)
No description available.
2

The influence of the benefits sought by visitors on the evaluation of the service quality provided in historic houses

Frochot, Isabelle Veronique January 1999 (has links)
No description available.
3

Approaches to behaviour change in highly mobile tourists : Investigating influencers and attitudes to high mobility travel

Dirir, Khalid January 2016 (has links)
Tourism mitigation is a contentious issue that requires a multifaceted approach to effectively achieve. The need to reduce personal traveling expenditure in order to mitigate the greenhouse gas emissions caused by tourism has not suitably been infiltrated within the public consciousness. Furthermore, those travellers who have been exposed to the reality that greenhouse gas emissions from tourism has often disregard that information and continue with their behaviour regardless.  This thesis aimed to investigate the reasons why those who travel the most in society, the hypermobile, choses to travel as much as they do and how this demand for travel could be curbed. It focused on three forms of tourism mitigation; government regulations, increases to the price of air travel and social marketing. The study was conducted with 10 individuals who self-identify as being highly mobile (more than 3 international return trips per year). The results showed that those who no single method of tourism mitigation would be effective in the goal of limiting highly mobile behavioural tendencies. A mixture of all three methods would be required in reaching the goal of lowering the levels of distance air travel consumption.
4

Drifting in the lucky country: Japanese students and working holiday makers in southeast Queensland

Horikawa, Tomoko Unknown Date (has links)
No description available.
5

Drifting in the lucky country: Japanese students and working holiday makers in southeast Queensland

Horikawa, Tomoko Unknown Date (has links)
No description available.
6

Incorporate Nudges into Walkability Design

Jun Chen (9178700) 28 July 2020 (has links)
<div>The rising inactive lifestyle highlights the need to find efficient ways to tackle this worldwide lousy habit. Conventionally, polices of resolving healthy issues such as smoking and overeating focus on providing regulations and information, drawing on the assumption that people will change behavior when they consciously realize the harms and benefits. However, policy interventions have only shown limited success. On the other side, nudging, which assumes people act subliminally and aims to steer people in the right direction without limiting their freedom of choice, is suggested as a promising approach in lessening healthy issues. However, nudging interventions have not received sufficient attention in research so far, especially with regards to walkable designs that lead people to intend to walk instead of taking motor vehicles. </div><div><br></div><div>To bridge this gap, innovatively, the present study incorporates nudging techniques into walkability design. Nudging techniques include priming, salience, and norms. Priming is a phenomenon whereby exposure to one stimulus influences a response to a subsequent stimulus, without conscious guidance. The present study primed participants with walking shoes in advance, expecting they have higher intention in walking in later experiments. Salience bias predisposes individuals to focus on items that are more prominent or emotionally striking and ignore those that are unremarkable. In order to generate salience bias, sidewalks of a street view on a black-and-white sketch were highlighted with colors. Then, the study displays the sketch with colored sidewalks to participants, expecting those with salience bias have a higher intention to walk. Norms are typical patterns of behavior, generally accompanied by the expectation that people will behave according to the pattern. The norm in this study delivered the information that most tourists are walking, expecting a participant who received the information will act consistently with the majority. </div><div><br></div><div>The research is based on a carefully designed online questionnaire with scenario-based experiments where participants imagined to be tourists. Research results reveal: 1) priming with walking shoes has significant effects on inspiring people to walk, 2) salient sidewalks nudge people to walk and warm colors like red even have more potential in encouraging walking, and 3) descriptive norms have potent effects on nudging walking, especially when added with identification information. Further, three mediators were identified to bridge the effect of salience on walking intention, namely visibility, excitement, and enjoyment. Visibility represents how noticeable the sidewalks are. Excitement indicates colored and un-colored sidewalks bring expected exciting or boring experience. Enjoyment is the degree of pleasure that participants perceived when imaging to walk on the sidewalks. Collectively, visibility, excitement, enjoyment, prime, and norms together play crucial roles in nudging people to walk. Additionally, females, exercise lovers, and hospitality and leisure industry workers tend to have higher intentions in walking while traveling. </div><div><br></div><div>Theoretically, the thesis adds new knowledge to interventions and deconstructions of tourists' walking intentions. Additionally, the study contributes to the refinement of descriptive norms and the literature of social comparison. Practically, the study implies that wellness resources need to be easily noticed by the public so as to make optimal use of healthy support. It also alarms tourism practitioners that besides improving tourists' health, wellness resources can become a pull factor of the tourist attraction and thereby bring tourism economic benefits.</div>
7

Exploring the potential of social marketing to encourage sustainable tourist behaviour in South West England

Wooler, Julie January 2014 (has links)
In the South West of England tourism provides an extremely important form of economic revenue, with 92 million nights spent in the region, generating over £9 billion in visitor spending and 11% of the total workforce employed either directly or indirectly in the sector. However this additional seasonal influx of visitors inevitably places a strain on the natural environment, built resources, infrastructure and communities. In order to readdress the balance tourism as a sector needs to be more sustainable and the emphasis for change is now placed on the individual. Social marketing has been used successfully to encourage behaviour change in the health sector, and is beginning to be recognised for its potential in encouraging sustainable behaviour, but has never been specifically applied in a tourism context. Therefore this research evaluates the potential of applying a social marketing methodology to encourage sustainable behaviour amongst tourists in two case study areas in South West England. Social marketing focusses on changing behaviour by understanding individual perceptions of the barriers to and motivations for behaviour. A social methodology then works to segment individuals into groups that share similar attitudes and beliefs, those groups identified as most likely to respond, are targeted with an intervention to encourage behaviour change. This research identified the perceived and actual barriers to (cost, time, convenience), and motivations for sustainable tourist behaviour among participants from the case study areas and identified three distinct clusters of tourists, one of which was identified as suitable for targeting with a social marketing intervention. This research also revealed that even those most committed to range of sustainable behaviours in the home environment do not continue this behaviour when in the holiday environment. A further dimension was added to this research by exploring the use of an ecological footprint calculator (REAP for Tourism) to quantify the environmental impact of individual tourists and to explore whether pro-environmental attitudes and behaviour equate to lower environmental impact.
8

Energy use in the New Zealand tourism sector

Becken, Susanne January 2002 (has links)
Energy use associated with tourism has rarely been studied, despite a potentially considerable contribution to global or national energy demand and concomitant greenhouse gas emissions. In New Zealand, tourism constitutes an increasingly important economic sector that is supported by the Government to induce further economic growth. At the same time New Zealand is facing the challenge of reducing currently increasing fossil fuel combustion and carbon dioxide emissions. As a response, this study investigated the contribution tourism makes to energy use in New Zealand. In particular it has examined the role of the three main tourism subsectors (transport, accommodation, and attractions/activities), and different domestic and international 'tourist types'. Seven separate data analyses provided inputs for building a model based on 'tourist types' from which energy use in the New Zealand tourism sector could be estimated. Tourism was found to contribute at least 5.6% to national energy demand, which is larger than its 4.9% contribution to GDP in 2000. Transport, in particular domestic air and car travel, was identified as the dominant energy consumer. Within the accommodation sub-sector, hotels are the largest energy consumers, both in total and on a per visitor-night basis. Of the three sub-sectors, attractions and activities contribute least to energy use, however, activities such as scenic flights or boat cruises were recognised as being energy intensive. As a result of larger visitor volumes, domestic tourists contribute more to energy consumption than international tourists. Domestic and international tourists types differ in their energy consumption patterns, for example measured as energy use per travel day. Tourist types that rely on air travel are the most energy intensive ones, for example the domestic 'long air business' travellers or the international 'coach tourists'. The importance of international tourists' energy use will increase, given current growth rates. There are many options to decrease energy use of the tourism sector, with the most effective ones being within the energy intensive transport sub-sector. Increasing vehicle efficiencies and decreasing travel distances appear to be the most promising measures. This study argues that energy use depends largely on tourists' travel behaviour. Changing behaviour is possible but is postulated to be very difficult, and further research is needed to better understand tourists' motivations, expectations and decision-making. Only then, can strategies be developed and implemented to alter travel behaviours to better balance energy use, other environmental impacts and economic yield. Such a balance is a crucial consideration in the search for more sustainable forms of tourism.
9

Travel motivations to selected national parks in South Africa : Karoo-, Tsitsikamma- and Kgalagadi Transfrontier National Parks / L. Bothma

Bothma, Lee-Ann January 2009 (has links)
Research in tourist behaviour follows the cognitive approach. This contains the behavioural cycle of stimulation (motivation and intention formation), the actual behaviour and experience, and finally the evaluation of consequences. These stages are referred to in tourism as: the pre-trip experience (motivation and intention formation), travel stage (actual behaviour) and the post-travel stage (evaluation of the travel experience). The characteristics, which influence tourist behaviour, indicate that travel motivations are the result of how tourists behave (tourist behaviour). These characteristics are: the decision-making process, demographical factors, marketing mix, external/social factors and internal/ psychological factors (motivations). Motivations to travel have a major influence on the travel behaviour of tourists. Tourists' motivations to satisfy their needs directly influence their behaviour, or the actions they take, in order to satisfy these needs. Due to its impelling and compelling nature, motivation is considered to be one of the most important variables in explaining tourist behaviour. As countries and destinations strive to increase their share of the international and national tourism market, it becomes important to understand why people travel and why they choose a specific ecotourism destination. If travel motivations of tourists are known to the product, it will be an aid when developing a competitive marketing strategy. From the literary review, the following travel motivations occurred regularly: leisure, excitement, socialisation, relaxation, family togetherness, escape, culture, novelty, attractions, knowledge seeking, adventure, prestige, nature, facilities, recreation, attributes, nostalgia, photography, exploration and activities. The literary review further revealed that there are travel motivations commonly found with regard to tourism destinations, and on the other hand, there are travel motivations which are product related. The aim of this research was to determine the travel motivations of tourists to selected national parks in South Africa: Karoo-, Kgalagadi Transfrontier- and Tsitsikamma National Parks. Secondary data was used to determine the visitors' profile, as well as the factor analysis on travel motivations. For the visitors' profile, 286 questionnaires were administered for Karoo National Park, 468 for the Tsitsikamma National Park and 582 for Kgalagadi Transfrontier National Park. For the factor analysis, 318 questionnaires were administered for Karoo National Park, 673 for the Tsitsikamma National Park and 534 for Kgalagadi Transfrontier National Park. Primary data was used to determine the reasons for visiting these parks. 101 Questionnaires were administered for Karoo National Park, 192 for the Tsitsikamma National Park and 104 for Kgalagadi Transfrontier National Park. The foremost findings of the research were divided into three categories, namely: visitors' profile, reasons for visiting the parks and travel motivations. Regarding visitors profile; it was found that profiles for the three parks were quite similar, except for the following: expenditure of tourists at Kgalagadi Transfrontier National Park, where the average spending of tourists was higher and directly linked to the duration of stay; duration of stay indicated that tourists visiting Kgalagadi Transfrontier National Park stayed longer. Two major markets were revealed by the research for all three parks, namely: Gauteng and Western Cape, with the exception of Tsitsikamma National Park, which had a third market of importance, namely Eastern Cape. This information is important when developing marketing strategies. It was especially evident that 4x4 vehicles are the preferred mode of transport for visitors to Kgalagadi Transfrontier National Park. Therefore, this park can be marketed as a 4x4 destination. From these results one can conclude that the profile of tourists to the three selected national parks showed minor differences. Primary data was used to determine the reasons why tourists visit the selected parks. Among the most important travel reasons why tourists visit the selected parks, was: to relax, for family recreation, to get away from regular routine and for the benefit of the children. The factor analysis regarding travel motives revealed the following: five factors were identified for Karoo National Park and six factors were identified for both Tsitsikamma- and Kgalagadi Transfrontier National Parks. Results illustrated that these parks have common and unique motives. Common travel motives in these parks include: park attributes, escape and relaxation, as well as knowledge seeking. Unique to Karoo National Park, was attractions and family togetherness, compared to photography and adventure for Kgalagadi Transfrontier National Park, and adventure and attractions for the Tsitsikamma National Park. A combined factor analysis was also conducted, which showed knowledge seeking, park attributes, as well as escape and relaxation as the most important travel motives of tourists visiting the three selected national parks. This research, therefore, confirmed that different attractions and destinations feed different travel motives, even when classified as similar types of products. Marketers can use this information to position these parks and to develop better marketing strategies, to enable national parks to outwit their competitors. / Thesis (M.A. (Tourism))--North-West University, Potchefstroom Campus, 2009.
10

Travel motivations to selected national parks in South Africa : Karoo-, Tsitsikamma- and Kgalagadi Transfrontier National Parks / L. Bothma

Bothma, Lee-Ann January 2009 (has links)
Research in tourist behaviour follows the cognitive approach. This contains the behavioural cycle of stimulation (motivation and intention formation), the actual behaviour and experience, and finally the evaluation of consequences. These stages are referred to in tourism as: the pre-trip experience (motivation and intention formation), travel stage (actual behaviour) and the post-travel stage (evaluation of the travel experience). The characteristics, which influence tourist behaviour, indicate that travel motivations are the result of how tourists behave (tourist behaviour). These characteristics are: the decision-making process, demographical factors, marketing mix, external/social factors and internal/ psychological factors (motivations). Motivations to travel have a major influence on the travel behaviour of tourists. Tourists' motivations to satisfy their needs directly influence their behaviour, or the actions they take, in order to satisfy these needs. Due to its impelling and compelling nature, motivation is considered to be one of the most important variables in explaining tourist behaviour. As countries and destinations strive to increase their share of the international and national tourism market, it becomes important to understand why people travel and why they choose a specific ecotourism destination. If travel motivations of tourists are known to the product, it will be an aid when developing a competitive marketing strategy. From the literary review, the following travel motivations occurred regularly: leisure, excitement, socialisation, relaxation, family togetherness, escape, culture, novelty, attractions, knowledge seeking, adventure, prestige, nature, facilities, recreation, attributes, nostalgia, photography, exploration and activities. The literary review further revealed that there are travel motivations commonly found with regard to tourism destinations, and on the other hand, there are travel motivations which are product related. The aim of this research was to determine the travel motivations of tourists to selected national parks in South Africa: Karoo-, Kgalagadi Transfrontier- and Tsitsikamma National Parks. Secondary data was used to determine the visitors' profile, as well as the factor analysis on travel motivations. For the visitors' profile, 286 questionnaires were administered for Karoo National Park, 468 for the Tsitsikamma National Park and 582 for Kgalagadi Transfrontier National Park. For the factor analysis, 318 questionnaires were administered for Karoo National Park, 673 for the Tsitsikamma National Park and 534 for Kgalagadi Transfrontier National Park. Primary data was used to determine the reasons for visiting these parks. 101 Questionnaires were administered for Karoo National Park, 192 for the Tsitsikamma National Park and 104 for Kgalagadi Transfrontier National Park. The foremost findings of the research were divided into three categories, namely: visitors' profile, reasons for visiting the parks and travel motivations. Regarding visitors profile; it was found that profiles for the three parks were quite similar, except for the following: expenditure of tourists at Kgalagadi Transfrontier National Park, where the average spending of tourists was higher and directly linked to the duration of stay; duration of stay indicated that tourists visiting Kgalagadi Transfrontier National Park stayed longer. Two major markets were revealed by the research for all three parks, namely: Gauteng and Western Cape, with the exception of Tsitsikamma National Park, which had a third market of importance, namely Eastern Cape. This information is important when developing marketing strategies. It was especially evident that 4x4 vehicles are the preferred mode of transport for visitors to Kgalagadi Transfrontier National Park. Therefore, this park can be marketed as a 4x4 destination. From these results one can conclude that the profile of tourists to the three selected national parks showed minor differences. Primary data was used to determine the reasons why tourists visit the selected parks. Among the most important travel reasons why tourists visit the selected parks, was: to relax, for family recreation, to get away from regular routine and for the benefit of the children. The factor analysis regarding travel motives revealed the following: five factors were identified for Karoo National Park and six factors were identified for both Tsitsikamma- and Kgalagadi Transfrontier National Parks. Results illustrated that these parks have common and unique motives. Common travel motives in these parks include: park attributes, escape and relaxation, as well as knowledge seeking. Unique to Karoo National Park, was attractions and family togetherness, compared to photography and adventure for Kgalagadi Transfrontier National Park, and adventure and attractions for the Tsitsikamma National Park. A combined factor analysis was also conducted, which showed knowledge seeking, park attributes, as well as escape and relaxation as the most important travel motives of tourists visiting the three selected national parks. This research, therefore, confirmed that different attractions and destinations feed different travel motives, even when classified as similar types of products. Marketers can use this information to position these parks and to develop better marketing strategies, to enable national parks to outwit their competitors. / Thesis (M.A. (Tourism))--North-West University, Potchefstroom Campus, 2009.

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