• Refine Query
  • Source
  • Publication year
  • to
  • Language
  • 24
  • 15
  • 5
  • 4
  • 2
  • 1
  • 1
  • Tagged with
  • 59
  • 59
  • 14
  • 13
  • 12
  • 11
  • 11
  • 10
  • 9
  • 9
  • 9
  • 8
  • 8
  • 8
  • 8
  • About
  • The Global ETD Search service is a free service for researchers to find electronic theses and dissertations. This service is provided by the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations.
    Our metadata is collected from universities around the world. If you manage a university/consortium/country archive and want to be added, details can be found on the NDLTD website.
1

The distribution and seasonal availability of surface water on the Manyeleti Game Reserve, Limpopo Province, South Africa

Cronje, HP, Cronje, I, Botha, AJ 13 October 2005 (has links)
The availability and abundance of surface water on the Manyeleti Game Reserve was quantified to provide information towards the development of a water provision policy. A total of 696 water source sites were located with a mean distance of 223.3 m apart. The water source sites (natural and artificial) were monitored seasonally to describe the seasonal availability of surface water on the Manyeleti Game Reserve. There were significant relationships between seasonal rainfall and the number of water source sites and maximum distance between sites. The large number of water sources is regulated by climatic progression and thus water provision on the Manyeleti Game Reserve follows a natural cycle linked primarily to rainfall. Water sources that dry up towards the dry seasons need to be supplied with water during drought periods in order to maintain game numbers without causing rangeland degradation. A water provision model that incorporates all the variables of the Greater Kruger Park Conservation Area, with particular reference to the smaller conservation areas within it, should become a research priority.
2

The Maasai : Changes in Livelihood after Land Loss

Mörner, Sofie January 2006 (has links)
<p>This is a case study about the Maasai and their land rights. The Maasai are semi-nomadic pastoralists, living in southern Kenya and northern Tanzania. It is said that they came to this area, now called Maasailand, about 300 years ago. In the beginning, they were independent and free to walk and graze their cattle without limitations and regulations. But when the British and German colonizers of these countries came to Maasailand, they discovered the advantages of its nature and started creating reserves. The Maasai were not strong enough to resist and it resulted in a land loss of two thirds for them. This has forced them to change their livelihood. They have to combine their pastoral lifestyle with other ways to make a living.</p><p>The main purpose with the study is to look at how the land loss has affected the Maasai and their livelihoods. The essay is mainly built on secondary sources, but also on a field work from the Ngorongoro Conservation Area, with qualitative interviews. This is used here, in order to give an example of a conservation area where the Maasai and the wildlife successfully coexist. To be able to understand the changes in Maasai livelihoods, the Sustainable Livelihoods Approach has been adapted. With this approach, a more holistic view of the changes can be made. The land losses have not always brought negative results for the Maasai. They have been able to adapt a multiple livelihood, including pastoralism, agriculture and tourist industry. The Maasai might benefit more by adapting different assets; instead of only rely on one.</p>
3

The Maasai : Changes in Livelihood after Land Loss

Mörner, Sofie January 2006 (has links)
This is a case study about the Maasai and their land rights. The Maasai are semi-nomadic pastoralists, living in southern Kenya and northern Tanzania. It is said that they came to this area, now called Maasailand, about 300 years ago. In the beginning, they were independent and free to walk and graze their cattle without limitations and regulations. But when the British and German colonizers of these countries came to Maasailand, they discovered the advantages of its nature and started creating reserves. The Maasai were not strong enough to resist and it resulted in a land loss of two thirds for them. This has forced them to change their livelihood. They have to combine their pastoral lifestyle with other ways to make a living. The main purpose with the study is to look at how the land loss has affected the Maasai and their livelihoods. The essay is mainly built on secondary sources, but also on a field work from the Ngorongoro Conservation Area, with qualitative interviews. This is used here, in order to give an example of a conservation area where the Maasai and the wildlife successfully coexist. To be able to understand the changes in Maasai livelihoods, the Sustainable Livelihoods Approach has been adapted. With this approach, a more holistic view of the changes can be made. The land losses have not always brought negative results for the Maasai. They have been able to adapt a multiple livelihood, including pastoralism, agriculture and tourist industry. The Maasai might benefit more by adapting different assets; instead of only rely on one.
4

Factors affecting ecoagriculture for integrated farming and biodiversity conservation in a transfrontier conservation area inSouthern Africa

Chitakira, Munyaradzi January 2013 (has links)
The transfrontier conservation areas (TFCAs) concept appears well-timed and appropriate to Southern Africa but the role of local communities in these enterprises is not defined. A framework that fully integrates agriculture, biodiversity conservation and livelihoods, known as ecoagriculture, provides opportunities for achieving TFCA goals through bottom-up means. The aim of this study is to investigate the feasibility of planning and managing ecoagriculture in the Lubombo TFCA spanning across the borders of South Africa, Mozambique and Swaziland. The study area is a biodiversity hotspot and is inhabited by poor people who need to meet their livelihood needs through utilising local natural resources. There is thus a need for initiatives that balance biodiversity protection and utilisation. Methodological triangulation including transect surveys, participant observation, key informant interviews, household questionnaire surveys and participatory approaches is employed. The study involves stakeholder identification and consultation, participatory landscape performance assessment, evaluation of the community’s future visioning and the analysis of policy and governance mechanisms impacting on ecoagriculture implementation. ii The study revealed a unique combination of stakeholders with varying degrees of importance and influence in the TFCA communities under focus, a situation which cannot be expected in an ordinary communal farming area. Potential conflicts of interest were evident among certain stakeholder groups but the stakeholder roles and interests were largely complementary. Key informant interviews pointed towards a high feasibility of planned ecoagriculture implementation in the area. The questionnaire survey showed an overwhelming willingness to plan the integration of biodiversity and farming. According to the participatory evaluation of the landscape’s performance the area’s overall performance score was 2.97 out of a possible score of 5, which implied a performance in the middle of the range. There were significant differences in the scores for the landscape dimensions (p-value < 0.01) but there were no significant differences in scores across the landscape (p-value = 0.37). The area is a mosaic of unplanned ecoagriculture with a good potential for transformation into systematically managed agriculture-biodiversity integrated approaches. Biodiversity-agriculture integration elements are evident in the Mathenjwa community vision, reflecting the community’s consciousness of its future in the TFCA. None of the Lubombo TFCA countries has an explicit ecoagriculture policy but ecoagriculture aspects are implied in existing legislation. Weak transboundary collaboration makes the Lubombo TFCA to exist as a treaty on paper rather than on the ground. Conflicts between customary norms and public legislation create policy enforcement challenges and pose a barrier to ecoagriculture implementation. Existing conditions could be improved to allow stakeholder-driven integrated landscape management. Innovative efforts (like policy harmonisation, capacity building and campaigns to raise awareness of the benefits of agriculturebiodiversity integration) are recommended for ecoagriculture to become a systematic landscape management practice in the area. The contributions of this study include: (i) a suggested framework for local community involvement in TFCAs which improves their resilience to climate change impacts, (ii) a suggested ecoagriculture feasibility index (EFI) for a specific landscape, (iii) a proposed landscape evaluation tool that practitioners and researchers can adopt, (iv) a methodological contribution to landscape studies involving the use of participatory processes and (v) contribution to the literature on the subject and practice of ecoagriculture. / Thesis (PhD)--University of Pretoria, 2013. / gm2013 / Geography, Geoinformatics and Meteorology / Unrestricted
5

Management plan for the Cinergy Conservation Area, Naboomspruit, Northern Province

Guldemond, Robert Abraham Rene 12 July 2006 (has links)
Please read the abstract in the section 00front of this document / Dissertation (M Inst Agrar (Sustainable Ecological Development))--University of Pretoria, 2006. / Zoology and Entomology / unrestricted
6

Perspectives of Sustainable Collaborative Management: A Case Study in Kerinci Seblat National Park, Sumatra-Indonesia

Yusri, Doni 15 June 2016 (has links)
No description available.
7

Implementação das áreas de proteção ambiental federais no Brasil: o enfoque da gestão / implementation of federal environmental protection areas in Brazil: the focus of management

Moraes, Marilia Britto Rodrigues de 14 December 2011 (has links)
A Área de Proteção Ambiental APA é, talvez, a mais complexa de todas as unidades de conservação, pois apresenta grandes desafios para que se consiga atingir seu ambicioso e complexo objetivo legal: o de compatibilizar a conservação da natureza com o uso sustentável de parcela dos seus recursos naturais. A partir de experiências práticas e estudos acadêmicos reunidos nesta pesquisa, busca-se demonstrar os pontos positivos e problemáticos para a implementação dessas unidades. Autores atuantes em várias disciplinas são tematizados ajudando-nos a encontrar caminhos para superar as dificuldades e promover aquilo que se mostra como a perspectiva futura para o mundo, que é uma alternativa de projeto de desenvolvimento. As instituições responsáveis pela gestão de territórios complexos têm significativo déficit a ser vencido, enquanto que as competências governamentais instituídas abrem espaço para a participação da sociedade. Trata-se de um outro nível de governança, mais complexa, e que exige criação de procedimentos e motivação para uma participação legítima e representativa. Neste trabalho são levantadas as experiências das APAs federais, através da análise da categoria, do levantamento de cada APA em seu contexto, e da dinâmica relativa a cada uma com base em busca na Web. A partir dessas informações, são feitas relações que, cotejadas com outras opiniões teóricas consideradas, apontam para possíveis encaminhamentos a serem buscados para as diferentes situações de gestão. Da análise de situação das APAs conclui-se que cabe construir a governança para operacionalizar uma política pública a ser co-protagonizada com a sociedade civil, que envolve um compromisso entre esta, os poderes constituídos e um projeto futuro, feito em conjunto, reconhecido como legítimo e coletivo. Implementar uma APA significa executar esse projeto, ou seja, levá-la da abstração sob a forma de mera definição legal que é para uma realidade concreta. Para isso, há que se compreender o lugar que, em sua corelação com o território usado, permite a construção da cidadania. Requer-se um sistema de gestão de caráter permanente, participativo, abrangente e inclusivo, atendendo à diversidade de paisagens e sua gente. / The Environmental Protection Area EPA is perhaps the most complex type of Protected Areas in Brazil, since its legal objective - to combine the conservation of nature and the sustainable use of natural resources involves great challenges. This paper focuses on positive and problematic issues for implementing the category, based on selected experiences and academic studies about related themes. The diversity of themes involved leads to some selected authors to overcome obstacles against what may be seen as a new perspective for a world development project. In this country, the institutions responsible for managing complex territories have a significant deficit to exceed, while the participation of society has an open space to be filled. Therefore it is a matter of building up a more complex level of governance, which requires the creation of new procedures and the necessary motivation for a legitimate representative participation, under a stewardship approach. In addition to many aspects of the EPA category itself, this work analyzes each one of the federal Environmental Protection Areas regarding their broader context and dynamics as they are perceived on Web search sites. Based on this information, some relations for each EPA are designed considering theoretical inputs in order to set in motion adequate management systems for such different situations. As a conclusion, implementing a public policy with society as a joint-protagonist means to build the governance, which involves a commitment between society and the constituted powers for a future, legitimate and collective common project. In other words, implementing an EPA means to carry out this project, turning it from the abstraction of an official definition into reality. To accomplish this, the environment that nurtures citizenship must be fully understood through permanent participation and an all-encompassing management system that take into account the diversity of the scenery and people involved.
8

Towards community-owned forests landowner perspectives on the Blackfoot Community Conservation Area /

Duvall, Alison Leigh. January 2006 (has links)
Thesis (M.S.)--University of Montana, 2006. / Title from PDF t.p. (viewed on July 2, 2007). Includes bibliographical references (p. 82-87).
9

THE IMPACT OF NATURE BASED TOURISM ACTIVITIES ON THE LIVELIHOOD OF LOCAL COMMUNITIES: A CASE STUDY OF NGORONGORO CONSERVATION AREA AUTHORITY, TANZANIA

Mosha, Michael January 2011 (has links)
No description available.
10

Perceptions of the impacts of nature conservation and ecotourism management: a case study in the Kakum conservation area of Ghana

Fiagbomeh, Raphael 14 December 2012 (has links)
No description available.

Page generated in 0.1508 seconds