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  • About
  • The Global ETD Search service is a free service for researchers to find electronic theses and dissertations. This service is provided by the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations.
    Our metadata is collected from universities around the world. If you manage a university/consortium/country archive and want to be added, details can be found on the NDLTD website.
61

Kunskapsöverföring inom franchisenätverk : En studie av utveckling och överföring av kunskap inom franchisenätverk

Vilhelmsson, Lars-Erik, Carlsson, Josef January 2010 (has links)
<p>This case study has been conducted within the Swedish fitness chain World Class to explore the opportunities for knowledge development and transfers within franchise networks. We have interviewed the product manager at the World Class headquarter, the owner of a franchise club and a local product manager from the same facility. Our finding indicates that various forms of knowledge transfer occur within the World Class network, particularly in product development and sales. The transfer occurs within the framework set by World Class with regularly scheduled meetings. In addition informal networks provide other means of knowledge exchange between some units. For the owner we found a lesser degree of knowledge exchange despite that they share the same kind of formal framework.</p><p>Our results points towards problems like the “not invented here”-syndrome, urge for independence and pride among the club owners. Besides that we found no resistance to share information from one unit to another. We found a lack of motivation for knowledge exchange, the benefits of knowledge transfer seemed unclear to the interviewed owner. Nevertheless, we found reasons to believe that entrepreneurship, innovation, creativity, the heterogeneity and the variety of market conditions within the franchise network gives high potential for knowledge exchange that may be unexploited.</p>
62

Knowledge Transfer by Repatriates : - a Case Study of Electrolux -

Gustavsson, Malin, Peszkowski, Caroline January 2007 (has links)
<p>Expatriates’ roles as knowledge senders are well known, but apart from this, expatriates can also acquire knowledge abroad. The repatriation process offers an opportunity to transfer and apply this knowledge back into the organization. However, few studies have been conducted with the purpose of mapping out how repatriates could contribute to the organization. This paper will explore how organizations can capture repatriates’ knowledge and the research will be carried out by a case study on the well-known company Electrolux. The expected contributions of this paper are to create an increased awareness of the neglected repatriation process and to broaden the current repatriation research base by investigating a Swedish multinational company. An effective repatriation process based on theory will be discussed and a model for knowledge transfer by repatriates will be presented and extended by conducting interviews with a HR manager and repatriates. We argue that an effective repatriation process will serve to reduce repatriates’ uncertainty and anxiety. In our case study the repatriates will transfer knowledge whether they are aware of it or not and independent of the organization’s receptivity, since they are still able to transfer knowledge on an on-going basis trough their daily work.</p>
63

Millennials Strike Back: Students’ Reports of Knowledge Transfer From High School to College

Wells, Jennifer Marie Holcomb 29 July 2011 (has links)
This study examines the extent to which high school students from an affluent, college preparatory high school were able to transfer their knowledge about reading and writing from high school to college. The participants’ perceptions of the transition from high school reading and writing to college reading and writing revealed that they did not perceive college work to be harder, but faster paced. They generally perceived similarities between high school writing and college writing; those similarities were both literal and conceptual. The participants were able to transfer content knowledge and procedural knowledge about reading and writing from high school to college. The participants who were most successful in their knowledge transfer demonstrated transfer enabling dispositions. This study raises questions about the nature of preparation for college. Implications are discussed for high school students and faculty, for college students and faculty, and for those interested in educational reform. / Dr. Bennett A. Rafoth Dr. Kathleen Blake Yancey Dr. Gian S. Pagnucci
64

Essays on the Entrepreneurial University

Mathieu, Azèle 15 June 2011 (has links)
National innovative performance is a key driver for sustainable growth (Pavitt, 1980). National innovative capacity may be improved by fostering industrial Research and Development (R&D), by funding academic research and by effectively supporting university-industry interactions in order to strengthen the linkage between R&D and product development. In a context of growing relevance of external sources of innovation, where the industry, rather than relying on internal R&D, increasingly engages in ‘open innovation’ (Chesbrough, 2006), the role played by universities is crucial. The essays presented in this thesis focus mainly on academic R&D and knowledge transfer mechanisms from the university viewpoint, as opposed to government or industry perspectives. These essays contribute to our understanding of how universities organise themselves to adapt to this changing context. In other words, the thesis looks at the ‘reflexivity’ norm of the system associated with the entrepreneurial university, as established by Etzkowitz (2004); or “a continuing renovation of the internal structure of the university as its relation to industry and government changes, and of industry and government as their relationship to the university is revised”. Universities play a major role in the national innovative capacity of a country as producers and transmitters of new knowledge (see for instance, Adams, 1990; Mansfield, 1991; Klevorick et al., 1995; Zucker et al., 1998; Cohen et al., 2002; Arundel and Geuna, 2004; Guellec and van Pottelsberghe, 2004). While European countries play a leading global role in terms of scientific output, they lag behind in the ability to convert this strength into wealth-generating innovations (this is known as the ‘European paradox’, see for instance Tijssen and van Wijk, 1999; and Dosi et al., 2005). This level of innovation may be improved by different factors; for instance, by fostering an entrepreneurial culture, or by increasing industry’s willingness to develop new products, new processes. One of these factors relies on the notion of an ‘entrepreneurial university’. Universities, in addition to the two traditional missions of research and teaching, foster their third mission of contribution to society, by improving the transfer of knowledge to the industry. New tools and regulations have been established to support universities in this process. Since the early 80’s, academic technology transfer offices (TTOs) have been created, dedicated employees have been trained and hired, incubators for the launch of new academic ventures have been set up, academic or independent pre-seed investment funds have been founded and laws related to the ownerships by university of their invented-patents have been promulgated. But what exactly stands behind the notion of ‘entrepreneurial university’? There exist more different descriptions of a similar concept or of a similar evolution than a general agreed definition. Indeed, "(…) There is high heterogeneity, there is no such thing as a typical university, and there is no typical way to be or become an entrepreneurial university" (Martinelli et al., 2008, p.260). However some similar patterns of what is or should be an entrepreneurial university may be identified. First, there is this notion of a revolution experienced by universities that now have to integrate a third mission of contributing to economic development aside of their traditional academic missions. “(…) But in the most advanced segments of the worldwide university system, a ‘second revolution’ takes off. The entrepreneurial university integrates economic development into the university as an academic function along with teaching and research. It is this ‘capitalisation of knowledge’ that is the heart of a new mission for the university, linking universities to users of knowledge more tightly and establishing the university as an economic actor in its own right” (Etzkowitz, 1998, p.833). This revolution finds its origin in a necessary adaptation of universities to an external changing environment where modern societies put a strong emphasis on knowledge. “The concept of the entrepreneurial university envisions an academic structure and function that is revised through the alignment of economic development with research and teaching as academic missions. The transformation of academia from a ‘secondary’ to a ‘primary’ institution is a heretofore unexpected outcome of the institutional development of modern society (Mills, 1958). In consequence, the knowledge industry in modern societies is no longer a minor affair run by an intellectual elite, an activity that might be considered by pragmatic leaders as expendable; it is a mammoth enterprise on a par with heavy industry, and just as necessary to the country in which it is situated (Graham, 1998, p.129)”, quoted by Etzkowitz et al. (2000, p.329). The notion of an ‘entrepreneurial university’ also exceeds the simple idea of the protection of academic intellectual property by patents owned by universities and their out-licensing as well as the launch of new ventures. It encompasses an overall change of how the university is organised. “In the gruesome and heady world of changing external environments, organizations – including universities – will need to seek opportunities beyond their existing competences (Hamel and Prahalad, 1989, 1994), which suggests the need for an entrepreneurial orientation (Lumpkin and Dess, 1996)”, quoted by Glassman et al. (2003, p.356). This entrepreneurial orientation will only be possible if the overall organisation of the university changes. “An entrepreneurial university, on its own, actively seeks to innovate how it goes about its business. It seeks to work out a substantial shift in organizational character so as to arrive at a more promising posture for the future. Entrepreneurial universities seek to become 'stand-up' universities that are significant actors on their own terms” (Clark, 1998, p.4). The notion of entrepreneurial university also encompasses the concept of academic entrepreneurship in its broad sense. For a university to become entrepreneurial, individual academics also have to adapt and to behave in an entrepreneurial way. This concept is not solely conceived here as the launching of new ventures by academics (a view embraced by Shane, 2004, for instance). It relates more to the view of Stevenson, Roberts and Grousbeck (1989), referenced by Glassman et al. (2003, p.354) or “the process of creating and seizing an opportunity and pursuing it to create something of value regardless of current available resources.” The difficulty facing universities is then to adapt to their external environment while preserving the integrity of their two traditional academic missions. However, some conceive this challenge as precisely an ability that characterise the very intrinsic university’s nature. "The uniqueness of the university,(…) lies in its protean capacity to change its shape and function to suit its temporal and sociopolitical environment while retaining enough continuity to deserve its unchanging name” (Perkin, 1984, p.18). Furthermore, others perceive this challenge as a tension that has always been at the root of the university’s character. “The cherished view of some academics that higher education started out on the Acropolis of scholarship and was desecrated by descent into the Agora of materialistic pursuit led by ungodly commercial interests and scheming public officials and venal academic leaders is just not true for the university systems that have developed at least since 1200 A.D. If anything, higher education started in the Agora, the market place, at the bottom of the hill and ascended to the Acropolis on the top of the hill… Mostly it has lived in tension, at one and the same time at the bottom of the hill, at the top of the hill, and on many paths in between” (Kerr, 1988, p.4; quoted by Glassman, 2003, p.353). Nevertheless, it appears that some institutions, the ones integrating the best their different missions and being the most ‘complete’ in terms of the activities they perform, will be better positioned to overcome this second revolution than other institutions. “Since science-based innovations increasingly have a multidisciplinary character and build on "difficult-to-codify" people-centred interactions, university-based systems of industry science links, which combine basic and applied research with a broader education mission, are seen as enjoying a comparative advantage relative to research institutes” (OECD, 2001 quoted by Debackere and Veugeleers, 2005, p.324). Or as stated by Geuna (1998, p.266), in his analysis of the way the different historical trajectories of European universities are influencing their ability to adapt to the current changing environment, “ (…) the renowned institutions of Cluster IV (pre-war institutions, large in size, with high research output and productivity) are in a strong position both scientifically and politically, and can exercise bargaining power in their relations with government and industry. (…) On the other side, universities in the other two clusters (new postwar universities, characterised by small size, low research output and low research orientation and productivity, whether involved in technological research or in teaching), with very low research grants from government, are pushed to rely more heavily on industrial funding. Being in a weak financial position, they may find themselves in an asymmetric bargaining relationship with industry that they may be unable to manage effectively.” To summarize, one could attempt to define the broad notion of an ‘entrepreneurial university’ as follows. An entrepreneurial university is a university that adapts to the current changing environment that puts a stronger emphasis on knowledge, by properly integrating the third mission or the capitalisation of knowledge aside of its two traditional missions. This adaptation requires a radical change in the way the university is organised. It will require important strategic reorientation from the top but also, and mainly, it will require from the individual academics to better seize new opportunities to generate value (not only financial but also scientific or academic) given scarcer resources. Renowned and complete universities (with teaching, basic and applied research) have an edge over other institutions to overcome this second revolution. This notion of ‘entrepreneurial university’ has drawn criticisms. For example, academics’ interactions with industry could impact negatively on research activities by reorienting fundamental research towards more applied research projects (Cohen and Randazzese, 1996; David, 2000), by restricting academic freedom (Cohen et al., 1994; Blumenthal et al., 1996; Blumenthal et al., 1997), or by potentially reducing scientific productivity (see for instance van Zeebroeck et al., 2008 for a review on this issue). The present work does not address the issue of the impact of increased interactions with the business sector on traditional academic missions nor the question of whether universities should become entrepreneurial or not. Instead, the essays start from the idea that the ‘entrepreneurial university’ notion is part of the intrinsic nature of modern universities, or at least, is a part of its evolution. Industry-university relationships are not a new phenomenon; it can be traced at least to the mid- to late-1800s in Europe and to at least the industrial revolution in the USA (Hall et al., 2001). What is evolving is the nature of such relationships that become more formal. The present analysis starts then from the general observation that some universities (and researchers) are more entrepreneurially-oriented and better accept this mission than others. From that stems the primary research question addressed in this thesis: are there characteristics or conditions leading to a smooth coexistence of traditional and new academic missions inside an entrepreneurial university? And if so, what are they? Existing work on the entrepreneurial university is a nascent but already well developed field of research. The aimed contribution of this thesis is to analyse the topic under three specific but complementary angles. These three perspectives are explored into the four main chapters of this work, structured as follows. Chapter 1 is titled “Turning science into business: A case study of a traditional European research university”. It introduces the topic by investigating the dynamics at play that may explain the propensity of a traditional, research-oriented university to start generate entrepreneurial outputs, while being not full-fledge entrepreneurially organised. Exploring the importance of “new” entrepreneurial outputs, as defined as patents and spin-off companies, compared to other ways of transferring new knowledge to the industry, Chapter 2 reviews the literature on the variety of knowledge transfer mechanisms (KTMs) used in university-industry interactions. It is titled “University-Industry interactions and knowledge transfer mechanisms: a critical survey”. Given scarcer structural funds for academic research and increasing pressure on academics to diversify their activities in terms of being involved in patenting or spin-off launching, Chapter 3 and Chapter 4 investigate the role played by individual characteristics of researchers in attracting competitive, external funding. Chapter 3 presents stylised facts related to external fundraising at ULB and characteristics of researchers who attracted these funds over the period 1998-2008. The empirical analysis on associations between individual characteristics of researchers (intrinsic, scientific and entrepreneurial) and the extent of funds attracted from different sources (national, regional and business) is presented in Chapter 4, titled “The determinants of academic fundraising.” Chapter 5 concludes and suggests ideas for future investigation on this topic. Chapter 6, in appendix of the present work, titled “A note on the drivers of R&D intensity”, is not directly linked to the issue of the entrepreneurial university. It has been included to complement the studied topic and to put in perspective the present work. Academic research and university-industry interactions constitute important drivers of a national R&D and innovation system. Other factors are at play as well. Looking at this issue at the macroeconomic level, Chapter 6 investigates to what extent the industrial structure of a country influences the observed R&D intensity, and hence would bias the well-known country rankings based on aggregate R&D intensity.
65

Kunskapsöverföring inom franchisenätverk : En studie av utveckling och överföring av kunskap inom franchisenätverk

Vilhelmsson, Lars-Erik, Carlsson, Josef January 2010 (has links)
This case study has been conducted within the Swedish fitness chain World Class to explore the opportunities for knowledge development and transfers within franchise networks. We have interviewed the product manager at the World Class headquarter, the owner of a franchise club and a local product manager from the same facility. Our finding indicates that various forms of knowledge transfer occur within the World Class network, particularly in product development and sales. The transfer occurs within the framework set by World Class with regularly scheduled meetings. In addition informal networks provide other means of knowledge exchange between some units. For the owner we found a lesser degree of knowledge exchange despite that they share the same kind of formal framework. Our results points towards problems like the “not invented here”-syndrome, urge for independence and pride among the club owners. Besides that we found no resistance to share information from one unit to another. We found a lack of motivation for knowledge exchange, the benefits of knowledge transfer seemed unclear to the interviewed owner. Nevertheless, we found reasons to believe that entrepreneurship, innovation, creativity, the heterogeneity and the variety of market conditions within the franchise network gives high potential for knowledge exchange that may be unexploited.
66

An Empirical Study of the Motivations of Education and Training, Personal Knowledge Transfer Impact on Work Performance and Learning Effectiveness

Yang, Su-tuan 10 September 2007 (has links)
In order to pursue continuous profit and long term management, the human resources is can be consider as an important assets of enterprises.The goal of human resource development is set up for organization future development, and staff capability can also been improve from the effective execution of education and training. Moreover, human resource development is a tool of promoting manpower into organizational ability via education and training. Thus, enterprises in various countries have invested in human resource management for the improvement in the level of its development.This research has covered many areas, including, motivations of education and training , personal knowledge transfer, positive effort of personal knowledge transfer in relate to work performance and learning effectiveness, and evaluation of the result after educational training . This research is based on 281 effectively survey from staff who has been through business educational training among manufacturing, service and financial sectors in Taiwan.By applying SEM, ANOVA system on real event analysis, the result of study is shown as below. Firstly, motivations of education and training and personal knowledge transfer have generated positive effort in relating to work performance and learning effectiveness. Secondly, according to survey, motivations of education and training has positive impact on personal knowledge transfer, and at the same time, personal knowledge transfer also brings positive influence to work performance. Therefore, it also indicates that motivations of education and training has positive impact to work performance as well. Third, as known motivations of education and training have positive impact on personal knowledge transfer. On the other hand, personal knowledge transfer has brought positive influence to learning effectiveness. Therefore, it also indicates that motivations of education and training has positive impact to learning effectiveness as well.Eventually, various personal characteristics may cause different impact on motivations of education and training , personal knowledge transfer, work performance and learning effectiveness.
67

Knowledge Transfer by Repatriates : - a Case Study of Electrolux -

Gustavsson, Malin, Peszkowski, Caroline January 2007 (has links)
Expatriates’ roles as knowledge senders are well known, but apart from this, expatriates can also acquire knowledge abroad. The repatriation process offers an opportunity to transfer and apply this knowledge back into the organization. However, few studies have been conducted with the purpose of mapping out how repatriates could contribute to the organization. This paper will explore how organizations can capture repatriates’ knowledge and the research will be carried out by a case study on the well-known company Electrolux. The expected contributions of this paper are to create an increased awareness of the neglected repatriation process and to broaden the current repatriation research base by investigating a Swedish multinational company. An effective repatriation process based on theory will be discussed and a model for knowledge transfer by repatriates will be presented and extended by conducting interviews with a HR manager and repatriates. We argue that an effective repatriation process will serve to reduce repatriates’ uncertainty and anxiety. In our case study the repatriates will transfer knowledge whether they are aware of it or not and independent of the organization’s receptivity, since they are still able to transfer knowledge on an on-going basis trough their daily work.
68

Knowledge transfer from expatriates : A study of MNCs’ exploitation of expatriates’ knowledge

Hermansson, Frida, Kilnes, Ulrika January 2008 (has links)
This paper investigates how expatriates experience that their knowledge gained from international assignments is transferred and exploited by the MNC. The results from 93 expatriates from eleven Large Cap companies suggest that knowledge is not exploited trough formal mechanisms. Instead informal mechanisms of knowledge transfer such as networks and own initiatives seem to be a more common way of transferring and exploiting knowledge in the investigated MNCs. The findings indicate that the knowledge that the expatriates that failed their mission abroad gained is not exploited to the same extent as the expatriates that successfully completed their assignments.
69

Leadership Education: possible ways of learning leadership skills for future leaders

Sultana, Norin January 2013 (has links)
In this postindustrial era, organizations have realized a dire need to have work force with leadership skills in order to maintain their competitive edge in the market place. This has stretched the scope of leadership education to diverse field of studies and has raised the number of leadership education programs offered in colleges and universities all over the world. This thesis is an exploratory study to identify key features of leadership education that distinguish it from conventional educational programs. In view of key early career challenges faced by graduates, research hypotheses were generated regarding the role played by different type of leadership educators and various means employed for leadership education. In order to test the research hypotheses web based questionnaire was distributed among 72 students of three Master Programs at Linnaeus University, Sweden, of whom 32 responded, giving an overall response rate of 44.4%. Among the three Master Programs, two offer leadership education while one offers courses in business strategy and marketing. Furthermore, interviews were conducted with the program directors of three Master Programs. The commercial statistical software GraphPad Prism version 5.04 was employed for statistical analysis of the data. The results have showed a clear distinction of perceptions among the students of two types of programs, one that offer leadership education and other that do not, in terms of role of different type of leadership educators and various means employed for leadership education. It has been concluded that leadership programs have helped in developing the leadership mindset and vital leadership skills.
70

The role of social interaction in knowledge transfer : How do clusters of countries impact the transfer in a Management Consultancy?

Sjönell, Jessica, Qvarnström, Charles January 2013 (has links)
Multinational companies in the global economy of today are competing based on strategic knowledge. The ability to send and receive knowledge within different subsidiaries has therefore become imperative for the international firm. There are several known barriers and facilitators to transferring knowledge across different borders. Social interaction is one variable that by some have been shown to positively impact the knowledge sharing within multinational companies. The challenges social interaction bridges are especially related to tacit knowledge, which is foremost shared through face-to-face interaction in social communities. In this study, we investigated this impact in a management consultancy operating in the knowledge intensive service sector. We further investigate the implications of communities in the shape of country clusters and its effects on social interaction and knowledge transfer within the firm. Our findings show that social interaction is only positively relevant in terms of sending knowledge, and not on receiving knowledge. Moreover, our study did not find any significant impact of social interaction on knowledge transfer within the country clusters.

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