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  • About
  • The Global ETD Search service is a free service for researchers to find electronic theses and dissertations. This service is provided by the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations.
    Our metadata is collected from universities around the world. If you manage a university/consortium/country archive and want to be added, details can be found on the NDLTD website.
101

Sensory perceptual experiences in autism

O'Neill, Meena January 2001 (has links)
No description available.
102

Reflections on describing and descriptions of self-relations

Snell, Anita Joanne 02 June 2017 (has links)
The influence an individual’s perspective has on her or his perceptions is a critical issue in the field of counselling. Counsellors are required to maintain a considerable level of self-awareness in order not to confuse their own experience with the experience of their client. It is proposed that an essential component of such self-awareness includes a knowledge of self-relations. The term self-relations implies both a self-structure - a relatively stable developmental integration of patterns and awarenesses - and the dynamic, shifting relationships within that self-structure. This study addressed the question: “How do four counsellors describe their self-relations?” The purpose of the inquiry was to gain knowledge about a range of self-relations, from functional to problematic, therefore counsellors who work with individuals meeting diagnostic criteria of borderline personality disorder [BPD] were selected. Borderline personality disorder is significant to the study in that the most commonly cited criterion for this disorder is the experiencing of difficulties concerning self-integration. Following a detailed methodological description of the interview and analysis procedures, the resulting themes are explicated. Themes emerged from four general categories: (a) events that took place in the interview, (b) personal themes, (c) professional issues, and (d) the interviewer’s perspective. The principal finding was the identification of an inherent correspondence between the participants’ self-relations and their therapeutic interventions. The manner in which figurative language constituted the individual styles of self-relations is explored. Implications for practice include a discussion of dissociative processes that focuses on the significant qualitative difference between theoretical conceptions and lived experience. An exercise is included in the appendixes that assists in the process of describing self-relations. It is recommended that this exercise be included as a component of counsellor education. / Graduate
103

Integrative Inkblot Perception as a Function of Intelligence of Institutionalized Children

Dodd, C. Dale 01 1900 (has links)
This thesis endeavors to establish the validity of several measurements of intelligence which have been developed from inkblot perception theory.
104

Conceptualization and Empirical Definition of Time Perspective

Farmer, W. H. (William H.) 06 1900 (has links)
The primary purpose of this thesis is to determine whether or not time perspective can be represented by a relatively simple unitary measure in the form of a questionnaire. More specifically, the aim is to determine whether or not time perspective can be represented as a scalable attitude in accordance with the Guttman scalogram model.
105

The validity and reliability of visual perceptual standardised tests in children from the Gauteng province, South Africa

Harris, Monique January 2017 (has links)
A dissertation submitted to the Faculty of Health Sciences, School of Therapeutic Sciences, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, in fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Science in Occupational Therapy. Johannesburg, 2017 / Occupational therapists routinely make use of the Test of Visual Perceptual Skills - Third Edition (TVPS-3), the Developmental Test of Visual Perception - Third Edition (DTVP-3) and the Developmental Test of Visual-Motor integration - Six Edition (Beery VMI-6) to determine visual perception and visual-motor integration (VMI) dysfunction. This study aimed to determine the validity and reliability of the TVPS-3, DTVP-3 and Beery VMI-6, on a sample of six to nine year old South African children. The scores for the typical children attending a mainstream school fell within the norms reported for children in the USA for all three tests. The DTVP-3, TVPS-3 and Beery VMI-6 were found to discriminate between children with and without a specific learning disability. All three assessments were found to have low levels of sensitivity, however were found to exhibit adequate levels of reliability. With the exception of the visual closure subtest on the TVPS-3 and DTVP-3, the tests cannot be used interchangeably but are all suitable for use with South African children from middle socio-economic backgrounds and can be used to identify visual perceptual and VMI dysfunction. This study was limited by a few factors such as that not all learners with a specific learning disability had visual perceptual problems, the participants used in this study only represented one region of Johannesburg and one province and lastly only learners aged six to nine years were included in this study. Further research on a more representative sample of South African learners is recommended as socio-economic status and environmental conditions have been shown to affect the performance on these tests. / MT2017
106

Pooled response hypothesis revisited: evidence from inter-trial effects.

January 2006 (has links)
Chan Ka Ho. / Thesis (M.Phil.)--Chinese University of Hong Kong, 2006. / Includes bibliographical references (leaves 56-58). / Abstracts in English and Chinese. / Abstract --- p.i / Acknowledgement --- p.ii / Table of Content --- p.iv / Introduction --- p.1 / Experiment 1 --- p.15 / Experiment 2 and 3 --- p.22 / Experiment 2 --- p.25 / Experiment 3 --- p.32 / General Discussion --- p.37 / References --- p.56
107

The effect of photometric brightness on judgments of distance

Coules, John January 1953 (has links)
Thesis (Ph.D.)--Boston University. / It is generally accepted that the brightness of a stimulus object is a factor in judgments of distance. However, very little knowledge about the functional relationships between photometric brightness and distance judgments have been obtained. Graham and others have shown that the psychophysical methods used to obtain stimulus-response relationships can also provide stimulus-stimulus functions. In the latter type of function information can be obtained which shows how one measurable stimulus attribute varies as a function of another, with the response as a parameter. This study was concerned with determining both of these relationships. The specific objectives in this study were: (1) to discover the functional relationships between ratios of photometric brightness and judgments of distance under binocular and monocular conditions (the major experiment) and (2) to show the effect of brightness ratios on judgments of distance when the absolute level of brightness is varied (the minor experiment). [TRUNCATED]
108

The role of view information in virtual environment navigation.

January 2004 (has links)
Wong Hon-chung. / Thesis (M.Phil.)--Chinese University of Hong Kong, 2004. / Includes bibliographical references (leaves 88-91). / Abstracts in English and Chinese. / Chapter Chapter 1: --- Introduction --- p.1 / "A Stage Model of Primary Spatial Learning (Siegel & White, 1975; Siegel, 1977)" --- p.2 / "Spatial Knowledge as Problem-Solving Strategy (Aginsky et. al.,1997)" --- p.4 / Viewpoint Dependency in Object Recognition --- p.6 / Rationale for the Study --- p.8 / Chapter Chapter 2: --- Experiment 1 --- p.12 / Method --- p.12 / Participants --- p.12 / Stimuli --- p.12 / Landmark Objects --- p.12 / Virtual Environment --- p.15 / Procedure --- p.18 / Learning Phase --- p.18 / Testing Phase --- p.19 / Results --- p.20 / Sensitivity --- p.22 / Degree of Discrepancy --- p.22 / Confidence Rating --- p.23 / Discussion --- p.23 / Chapter Chapter 3: --- Experiment 2 --- p.26 / Method --- p.28 / Participants --- p.28 / Stimuli --- p.28 / Landmark Objects --- p.28 / Virtual Environment --- p.28 / Procedure --- p.29 / Learning Phase --- p.30 / Testing Phase --- p.30 / Results --- p.30 / Sensitivity --- p.33 / Degree of Discrepancy --- p.33 / Confidence Rating --- p.33 / Discussion --- p.36 / Chapter Chapter 4: --- Experiment 3 --- p.38 / Method --- p.39 / Participants --- p.39 / Role of View in Virtual Navigation --- p.vii / Stimuli --- p.29 / Landmark Objects --- p.39 / Virtual Environment --- p.41 / Procedure --- p.43 / Learning Phase --- p.43 / Testing Phase --- p.44 / Results --- p.44 / Online Measures --- p.44 / Number of Trials taken in Learning Phase --- p.46 / Number of Encounters with Landmark Objects during Learning Phase --- p.46 / Number of Turning Errors during Learning --- p.47 / Response Latency for Turning Decision --- p.49 / Offline Measures --- p.49 / Sensitivity --- p.51 / Degree of Discrepancy --- p.51 / Confidence Rating --- p.51 / Discussion --- p.52 / Effect of MAP --- p.52 / Manipulation on the NON-MAP Group --- p.54 / Manipulation on the MAP Group --- p.54 / Effect of INTERSECTION --- p.56 / Chapter Chapter 5: --- Experiment 4 --- p.59 / "Classification of Sketch Maps (Aginsky, et. al.1997)" --- p.59 / 0-D Group --- p.59 / 1-D Group --- p.50 / 2-D Group --- p.60 / Method --- p.60 / Participants --- p.60 / Stimuli --- p.60 / Procedure --- p.61 / Learning Phase --- p.61 / Testing Phase --- p.61 / Results --- p.61 / Classification of Illustrations --- p.62 / 0-D Group --- p.64 / 0.5-D Group --- p.64 / 1-D Group --- p.65 / 2-D Group --- p.65 / Online Measures --- p.66 / Number of Trials taken in Learning Phase --- p.68 / Number of Encounters with Landmark Objects during Learning Phase --- p.68 / Number of Turning Errors during Learning --- p.68 / Response Latency for Turning Decision --- p.68 / Offline Measures --- p.71 / Sensitivity --- p.73 / Degree of Discrepancy --- p.75 / Confidence Rating --- p.75 / Discussion --- p.75 / Effect of GROUP --- p.76 / Effect of INTERSECTION --- p.77 / Chapter Chapter 6: --- General Discussion --- p.79 / Spatial Learning Strategy --- p.79 / Type of Intersection --- p.80 / Differences in Number of Encounters --- p.81 / Differences in Number of Turning Errors and Response Latency --- p.82 / Differences in Sensitivity and Degree of Discrepancy --- p.82 / What Exactly Did the Type of Intersection Manipulated? --- p.85 / Environmental Characteristics --- p.86 / References --- p.88
109

Offset to onset or onset to onset?: a study of duration memory content in pre-attentive interval timing. / Duration memory content

January 2005 (has links)
Tse Chun Yu. / Thesis (M.Phil.)--Chinese University of Hong Kong, 2005. / Includes bibliographical references (leaves 84-91). / Abstract in English and Chinese. / Title Page --- p.i / Abstract (English) --- p.ii / Abstract (Chinese) --- p.iii / Acknowledgments --- p.iv / Table of Contents --- p.v / Chapter CHAPTER 1 --- Introduction --- p.1 / Scalar Expectancy Theory --- p.1 / Figure 1. --- p.2 / Filled and Empty Intervals --- p.3 / Superiority of Filled Intervals --- p.3 / Superiority of Empty Intervals --- p.8 / Adaptive Procedure and Inferiority of Empty Interval --- p.9 / Internal-Marker Hypothesis --- p.11 / Offset-onset Hypothesis and Onset-onset Hypothesis --- p.15 / Mismatch Negativity (MMN) --- p.17 / The Present Study --- p.19 / Hypothesis --- p.21 / Figure 2. --- p.22 / Figure 3. --- p.23 / Table 1. --- p.25 / Chapter CHAPTER 2 --- Experiment 1 --- p.26 / Method --- p.26 / Design --- p.26 / Participants --- p.26 / Stimuli and Procedure --- p.27 / Figure 4. --- p.28 / Figure 5. --- p.30 / Electrophysiological Recording and Data Analysis --- p.31 / Result --- p.33 / Figure 6. --- p.34 / Table 2. --- p.35 / Discussion --- p.36 / Table 3. --- p.38 / Chapter CHAPTER 3 --- Experiment 2 --- p.41 / Table 4. --- p.42 / Method --- p.44 / Design --- p.44 / Participants --- p.44 / Stimuli and Procedure --- p.44 / Figure 7a. --- p.46 / Figure 7b. --- p.47 / Electrophysiological Recording and Data Analysis --- p.48 / Result --- p.49 / Figure 8. --- p.51 / Figure 9. --- p.52 / Table 5. --- p.53 / Table 6. --- p.54 / Table 7. --- p.55 / Discussion --- p.56 / Table 8. --- p.58 / Chapter CHAPTER 4 --- Experiment 3 --- p.59 / Method --- p.60 / Design --- p.60 / Participants --- p.60 / Stimuli and Procedure --- p.60 / Table 9. --- p.63 / Electrophysiological Recording and Data Analysis --- p.64 / Table 10. --- p.67 / Result --- p.68 / Figure 10. --- p.69 / Table 11. --- p.70 / Table 12. --- p.72 / Discussion --- p.73 / Chapter CHAPTER 5 --- General Discussion --- p.76 / Temporal Structure and Early Timing Stage --- p.77 / Pre-attentive Timing and Attentive Timing --- p.77 / Alternative Explanation --- p.81 / Conclusion --- p.83 / REFERENCES --- p.84 / APPENDIX A Consent Form --- p.92 / APPENDIX B The Edinburgh Handedness Inventory --- p.94
110

The relationships among perceived contrast, noise, and content in printed images /

Parush, Avraham. January 1980 (has links)
No description available.

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