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  • About
  • The Global ETD Search service is a free service for researchers to find electronic theses and dissertations. This service is provided by the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations.
    Our metadata is collected from universities around the world. If you manage a university/consortium/country archive and want to be added, details can be found on the NDLTD website.
1

none

Tsai, Cheng-kuan 07 February 2004 (has links)
none
2

Meritocracy, education and occupational attainment : what do employers really see as merit?

Jackson, Michelle January 2003 (has links)
No description available.
3

Nursing recruitment literature and its use

Shea, Frederika P. January 1963 (has links)
Thesis (M.S.)--Boston University
4

Recruitment of Marine Sessile Fauna in Kenting Coral Reefs

Lin, Yi-han 10 September 2007 (has links)
The fate of coral reef biodiversity could be predicted from the extant situation and understanding the possible temporal and spatial mechanisms. Among the many hypotheses explaining the biodiversity, the Intermediate Disturbance Hypothesis is the most often tested. It proposed that the frequencies and intensities of disturbance determine the biological species diversity of a habitat; here seasonal recruitment is not considered an important factor. We propose Seasonal Recruitment Hypothesis here with three important characteristics and predictions: there is different assemblages of recruitment after disturbance in different seasons; the following succession is lead by these initial assemblages and thus have different patches for spaces created in different seasons. Mosaic of patches, each with different history, combined to form a high diversity ecosystem of coral reefs. In this investigation, the first hypothesis that recruitment assemblage is different among season, is tested. The study site is located in the coral reef of Kenting in southern Taiwan. We put out recruitment panels to simulate space generated after disturbance, at two-month intervals; then we checked the abundance of sessile fauna on the inside and outside surface of plates. A total of 17 zoological taxa was identified and numbered. Then Primer was used to ordinate the assemblages of recruitment from different seasons. A significant seasonal effect was found. Thus the first stage of the Seasonal Recruitment Hypothesis was supported.
5

"Green Acres" or "Gotham"? : rural job selection by UBC Pharmacy graduates

Pearson, Marion Louise 11 1900 (has links)
There is a pharmacist shortage in British Columbia that is considered particularly acute in rural and remote locations. As a result, the Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences at the University of British Columbia has increased enrolment from certain geographic areas, assuming that students will return to these areas on graduation. The main objectives of this study are to determine where pharmacy graduates take their first jobs and the factors that influence their selection of job location. Survey methodology was used, with a written questionnaire being administered to the Class of 2007 after a validation process involving volunteers from the Class of 2006. Mean values of responses on rating scales were compared to assess for statistically significant (p≤O.O5) effects of location size and the demographic variables of age, sex, marital status, and ethnicity. Of 93 respondents who reported both a primary home town and ajob location, only 33(35%) planned to take jobs where they grew up and only 42 (45%) were taking jobs in the same area of the province. The most common migration patterns were from smaller to larger communities and from all over the province into Metro Vancouver. Those who grew up in Metro Vancouver did not leave. However, the majority of those who did take jobs in other areas of the province had lived there previously. The strongest influences on job location were familiarity with the location, ability to get an enjoyable job, pace of life, proximity to significant others, and career and relationship plans. Smaller community size, ability to practice in the manner desired, and pace of work were more important, and access to cultural, entertainment, and/or social activities were less important to those taking jobs in rural rather than urban areas. There were no findings of practical significance associated with the demographic variables examined. The selective admission into 12 specially funded seats in the program of students from geographic areas other than the province’s one large urban centre is modestly effective in ensuring a supply of pharmacists for these areas. However, the use of geography as a criterion for all seats and an increase in the total number of seats would ensure that the student body is more representative of the provincial population and would address both supply and demand aspects of the pharmacist shortage.
6

"Green Acres" or "Gotham"? : rural job selection by UBC Pharmacy graduates

Pearson, Marion Louise 11 1900 (has links)
There is a pharmacist shortage in British Columbia that is considered particularly acute in rural and remote locations. As a result, the Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences at the University of British Columbia has increased enrolment from certain geographic areas, assuming that students will return to these areas on graduation. The main objectives of this study are to determine where pharmacy graduates take their first jobs and the factors that influence their selection of job location. Survey methodology was used, with a written questionnaire being administered to the Class of 2007 after a validation process involving volunteers from the Class of 2006. Mean values of responses on rating scales were compared to assess for statistically significant (p≤O.O5) effects of location size and the demographic variables of age, sex, marital status, and ethnicity. Of 93 respondents who reported both a primary home town and ajob location, only 33(35%) planned to take jobs where they grew up and only 42 (45%) were taking jobs in the same area of the province. The most common migration patterns were from smaller to larger communities and from all over the province into Metro Vancouver. Those who grew up in Metro Vancouver did not leave. However, the majority of those who did take jobs in other areas of the province had lived there previously. The strongest influences on job location were familiarity with the location, ability to get an enjoyable job, pace of life, proximity to significant others, and career and relationship plans. Smaller community size, ability to practice in the manner desired, and pace of work were more important, and access to cultural, entertainment, and/or social activities were less important to those taking jobs in rural rather than urban areas. There were no findings of practical significance associated with the demographic variables examined. The selective admission into 12 specially funded seats in the program of students from geographic areas other than the province’s one large urban centre is modestly effective in ensuring a supply of pharmacists for these areas. However, the use of geography as a criterion for all seats and an increase in the total number of seats would ensure that the student body is more representative of the provincial population and would address both supply and demand aspects of the pharmacist shortage.
7

The lived experience of choosing nursing as a profession

Polinard, Elizabeth Lee 10 February 2015 (has links)
The aim of this phenomenological study was to examine the lived experience of choosing professional nursing as a career and to explore the impact that public perception of nursing had on this choice for purposes of informing effective recruitment and retention strategies. Semi-structured interviews of 10 nurses who had been practicing between 11 months and two years were conducted. Five themes emerged from the data: Up Close and Personal/Exposure and Connection, The Image of Nursing, The Conflict Inherent in Nursing, Recruitment and Retention and the Work Environment. From these themes a description of the lived experience of choosing a career in nursing was formed. For these participants, the choice of nursing as a career bespoke a passion that had been affected—but not yet eclipsed—by conflict, compromised fulfillment, and the internalization of nursing and gendered stereotypes directly influenced by the image of nursing. Recommendations involved proposals for the support and preservation of the passion for the profession newer nurses demonstrate as well as health policy initiatives for programs, including a new ad campaign for nursing, that would expose the public to the value of a career in nursing and educate them about the significance and complexities of nursing practice. / text
8

Internal and external labour markets : a synthetic approach

Sutherland, Robert John Davidson January 2000 (has links)
The elevenp apersa ssociatedw ith this submissionre flect a researchp rogrammeth at has as its centralc onceptualf rameworka synthesiso f the traditionally competing perspectiveosf the 'externalla bour market'andt he 'internall abourm arketýT he Holt and David 'stock! and 'flow' model of the former is integrated with Doeringer and Piore'sm odelo f labour allocationa nd utilisation within the organisationto createa 'syntheticp aradigmt!h at offers, it is argued,a moreh olistic insighti nto the operation of labour markets.O ne especialc onsequenceo f the use of this paradigm is the opening up of the 'black box! that is the f= in much of the traditional labour economics literature. Not only are policies of company recruitment and selection transformedto becomee ssential,in tegral elementsw ithin the researchp rogramme, the externall abourm arketc onsequenceosf thesep oliciesa re seent o havei mportant implications for the identification and analysis of 'problems' of the external labour market. For purposes of the introductory, synthesising chapter, the eleven papers are subdivided into three themes. After an essential, preliminary quasi-ideological discussion of the role of perspectives in the literature pertaining to labour markets, the subsequent, predominantly empirical papers focus upon two aspects of the interrelationships between internal and external labour markets viz. engagements i. e. flows, principally from the external labour market, into organisations; and separations ie. flows from organisations, principally but not exclusively to, the external labour market. The synthesising chapter demonstrates - and the accompanying papers evidence - both the viability and the efficacy of the 'synthetic paradigm! and illustrates the additional insights into the problems and policies of employment and Iabour markets which accrue from its application.
9

Achievement, background and commitment : classifications of biographical data in personnel selection

Drakeley, Russell John January 1988 (has links)
No description available.
10

The UK executive search and selection industry

Clark, Timothy Adrian Robert January 1989 (has links)
No description available.

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