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  • About
  • The Global ETD Search service is a free service for researchers to find electronic theses and dissertations. This service is provided by the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations.
    Our metadata is collected from universities around the world. If you manage a university/consortium/country archive and want to be added, details can be found on the NDLTD website.
31

Differences in Offending among Bisexual and Heterosexual Youth: The Influence of Maternal Support and Running Away from Home

January 2018 (has links)
abstract: Research has consistently shown that gay/lesbian/bisexual (GLB) or sexual minority youth are at an increased risk for adverse outcomes resulting from the stress caused by continual exposure to negative events (e.g., victimization, discrimination). The present study used a nationally representative sample of adolescents to test mechanisms that may be responsible for the differences in offending behaviors among sexual minority and heterosexual adolescents. Specifically, this study tested whether bisexual adolescents received less maternal support than did heterosexual adolescents because of their sexual orientation, thus increasing the likelihood that they run away from home. This study then examined whether the greater likelihood that bisexual adolescents running away would lead to them committing a significantly higher variety of income-based offenses, but not a significantly higher variety of aggression-based offenses. This study tested the hypothesized mediation model using two separate indicators of sexual orientation measured at two different time points, modeled outcomes in two ways, as well as estimated the models separately for boys and girls. Structural equation modeling was used to test the hypothesized direct and indirect relations. Results showed support for maternal support and running away mediating the relations between sexual orientation and offending behaviors for the model predicting the likelihood of committing either an aggressive or an income offense, but only for girls who identified as bisexual in early adulthood. Results did not support these relations for the other models, suggesting that bisexual females have unique needs when it comes to prevention and intervention. Results also highlight the need for a greater understanding of sexual orientation measurement methodology. / Dissertation/Thesis / Doctoral Dissertation Psychology 2018
32

Polyfidelity and the Dynamics of Group Romantic Relationships

Peterson, Jeff R. 01 January 2017 (has links)
Monogamy is considered the romantic norm for establishing family and kinship. Alternative relationships such as polyfidelity, that is, a group romantic relationship, often face prejudice and social stigma resulting in a greater need for mental health counseling services compared to those who are not stigmatized. Yet counselors and counselor educators lack both understanding and cultural competency for serving this population. The purpose of this study was to better understand the dynamics of a polyfidelity relationship, as well as how a counselor might better serve the needs of individuals engaged in this type of relationship. In this study, 14 participants described what it was like to be in a polyfidelitous relationship. A combined theoretical framework-based on relational cultural theory, social constructionism, and queer theory was used to reveal the challenges, as well as the strengths, of such a relationship. It was discovered that there are an exponential number of relationship combinations when introducing an additional member into an existing 2-person relationship. As a result the relational component in counseling becomes compounded. For example, a 3-person relationship has 4 unique relationships, a 4-person relationship has 11 unique relationships, and a 5-person relationship has 26 unique relationship combinations. In addition, members of group relationships often use their group dynamics to check and balance one another, resolve conflict, and better express aspects of each partner's personality. The implications for social change are multifold in both furthering mental health professional's understanding of alternative families, as well as identifying the advantages and pitfalls of engaging in a polyfidelitous relationship.
33

Psychological Bisexuality And Otherness In The Novels Of Angela Carter, Virginia Woolf, Marge Piercy And Ursula Le Guin: A Study From The Perspective Of Ecriture Feminine

Peksen Yanikoglu, Seda 01 April 2008 (has links) (PDF)
This study analyses The Passion of New Eve by Angela Carter, Orlando by Virginia Woolf, Woman on the Edge of Time by Marge Piercy and The Left Hand of Darkness by Ursula Le Guin from the perspective of &eacute / criture f&eacute / minine. After a thorough discussion of the roots of &eacute / criture f&eacute / minine, the theory of the French feminists is put into practice in the analysis of the novels. The study asserts that the concepts of bisexuality, the other and the voice are common elements in novels of &eacute / criture f&eacute / minine, thereby the novelists mentioned in the study follow the propositions of H&eacute / l&egrave / ne Cixous, Julia Kristeva and Luc&eacute / Irigaray. The argument of the study is that the use of &eacute / criture f&eacute / minine as portrayed with reference to the novels, can be an efficient way in deconstructing the patriarchal system of language. Literature has a significant influence on social life, however women cannot make themselves heard using the language of patriarchy. Therefore an alternative such as &eacute / criture f&eacute / minine is essential. This study shows how this alternative can be practiced in various ways and it also creates the opportunity to consider the possibilities of alternative lives if this kind of thinking is widespread.
34

Sexual Attitudes and Motivations in Same-Sex and Mixed-Sex Relationships

Armstrong, Heather L. 04 February 2014 (has links)
People engage in sex for a wide variety of reasons and these reasons can differ depending on the individual, his or her partner, and on the context of the sexual encounter. The purpose of this dissertation was to examine how sexual attraction and sexual orientation, of both self and partner, affect an individual’s reasons to engage in sex, or sexual motivation. Three studies were conducted to explore these effects from both the individual’s and the partner’s perspective. In Study 1, individual attitudes toward having casual sex, dating, and being in a committed relationship with a bisexual partner of the other gender were examined in a sample of 720 men and women. Participants reported negative attitudes toward having these relationships and more negative attitudes were reported as the commitment level of the considered relationship increased. Women also reported more negative attitudes and greater insecurity toward relationships than men. In Study 2, the psychometric properties of a comprehensive research tool, the Why Have Sex? (YSEX?) questionnaire to use in Study 3 for the study of sexual motivation were evaluated in a sample of 146 women with same-sex attraction. Overall, the reliability of this scale was excellent for casual sex motivations and motivations for sex in committed relationships with female partners. In Study 3, motivations for sex and the effects of relationship context, sexual attraction, and the gender of one’s partner were explored in a sample of 510 women including women with same-sex attraction and women with exclusively heterosexual attraction. Results of this study showed that relationship context had the largest effect on sexual motivation; physical motivations were more strongly endorsed for casual sex while emotional motivations were more strongly endorsed for sex in committed relationships. No effect of sexual attraction was reported. Further, no effect of gender of partner was reported by sexual minority women. The results of this dissertation have important implications for the study of sexual motivation, specifically as it relates to sexual attraction and orientation. Motivations for sex are likely to be affected by an individual’s attitudes and perceptions of his or her partner’s sexual orientation and associated stereotypes. In addition, the type of sexual relationship and associated level of commitment had strong, differential effects on sexual motivation. This is a novel finding as the context of the sexual relationship has not previously been considered with respect to individual motivations for sex. Henceforth, studies on sexual motivation need to be more contextualized and include more comprehensive assessments of individuals to increase the validity of findings and demonstrate the complex variation of human sexual motivation.
35

A preliminary investigation of heterosexuals' attitudes toward bisexuality

Nollen, Nicole Lynn January 1997 (has links)
Three-hundred eight students from the Introductory Psychology participant pool at Ball State University took part in a preliminary investigation of heterosexuals' attitudes toward bisexuality. The study found that heterosexual men and women expressed more positive responses toward heterosexuals than toward lesbian, gay male, and bisexual individuals, but did not distinguish between homosexual and bisexual persons. Sex differences were found for acceptance of lesbians, gay men, and bisexual men and women but not for affective responses to these individuals. More specifically, male and female participants' affective responses to homosexual and bisexual target individuals were similar; however, on questions pertaining to acceptance, female participants rated all persons similarly whereas male participants rated heterosexual men more favorably than homosexual or bisexual men. It was also found that beliefs about bisexuality as a real orientation or as homosexual denial were in fact related to participants' responses to the bisexual target individual, whereas beliefs that bisexuality is a transitional or transitory orientation were not. / Department of Psychological Science
36

The impact of internalised homophobia and coping strategies on psychological distress following the experience of sexual prejudice

Cornish, Michael James January 2012 (has links)
It is widely accepted that the LGB (Lesbian, gay and bisexual) population have a higher risk of psychological distress compared to their heterosexual counterparts. Meyer (2003) proposed the minority stress model to explain this increased prevalence. This model proposed that the LGB population are subjected to additional stressors due to their minority status which results in the increased psychological distress observed. The purpose of this study was to investigate some of the risk factors proposed by this model, specifically experiences of sexual prejudice, negative internalised beliefs about homosexuality/bisexuality, coping strategies and how these factors interact to influence the development of psychological distress. This study included 542 LGB individuals who completed measures of sexual prejudice, internalised homophobia, coping strategies and current levels of psychological distress using an online survey. The study found a high prevalence of sexual prejudice within the sample, with 84% of the sample reporting at least one experience of sexual prejudice. 67% reported being verbally abused and 17% reported being physically assaulted. A high number of participants scored above the cut-off for a diagnosis of depression (27%) and anxiety (19%). Regression and path analysis revealed that maladaptive coping had the strongest effect on psychological distress. Sexual prejudice and internalised homophobia, also both had a significant direct impact upon psychological distress, and they were also partially mediated by maladaptive coping. Problem-focused coping was found to be a protective factor with a direct, albeit weak, effect on psychological distress. Problem-focused coping also partially mediated the relationship between sexual prejudice and psychological distress, slightly reducing the negative impact of sexual prejudice. The results suggest that maladaptive coping was the greatest risk factor, out of the ones measured, in the development of psychological distress in the LGB population. The outcomes suggest that clinical psychologists may wish to target their interventions at the development of more adaptive coping strategies, and the reduction of internalised homophobia. They should consider ways to reduce experiences of sexual prejudice by working at a community level to reduce the stigma of homosexuality/bisexuality.
37

En forskningsöversikt om hur bisexuellasöks i samhällsvetenskaplig forskning

Foxhage, Daniel January 2008 (has links)
A research review of 46 peer-reviewed articles with bisexuals as a target group was conducted with the objective to investigate methods of finding bisexual participants in empirical Social Sciences studies. The aim was to examine occurring definitions of “bisexual”, sample types, and sources of data. Results indicated that a self-identification definition was most frequently used, that sample type was seldom reported with an even distribution between probability and non-probability sample types when occurring, and that sources of data varied with media as most frequent. Some of the conclusions drawn were that bisexuals often occur in the same studies as lesbians and gay men, and that bisexual women have a poor representation in studies.
38

En forskningsöversikt om hur bisexuellasöks i samhällsvetenskaplig forskning

Foxhage, Daniel January 2008 (has links)
<p>A research review of 46 peer-reviewed articles with bisexuals as a target group was conducted with the objective to investigate methods of finding bisexual participants in empirical Social Sciences studies. The aim was to examine occurring definitions of “bisexual”, sample types, and sources of data. Results indicated that a self-identification definition was most frequently used, that sample type was seldom reported with an even distribution between probability and non-probability sample types when occurring, and that sources of data varied with media as most frequent. Some of the conclusions drawn were that bisexuals often occur in the same studies as lesbians and gay men, and that bisexual women have a poor representation in studies.</p>
39

Sexual Attitudes and Motivations in Same-Sex and Mixed-Sex Relationships

Armstrong, Heather L. January 2014 (has links)
People engage in sex for a wide variety of reasons and these reasons can differ depending on the individual, his or her partner, and on the context of the sexual encounter. The purpose of this dissertation was to examine how sexual attraction and sexual orientation, of both self and partner, affect an individual’s reasons to engage in sex, or sexual motivation. Three studies were conducted to explore these effects from both the individual’s and the partner’s perspective. In Study 1, individual attitudes toward having casual sex, dating, and being in a committed relationship with a bisexual partner of the other gender were examined in a sample of 720 men and women. Participants reported negative attitudes toward having these relationships and more negative attitudes were reported as the commitment level of the considered relationship increased. Women also reported more negative attitudes and greater insecurity toward relationships than men. In Study 2, the psychometric properties of a comprehensive research tool, the Why Have Sex? (YSEX?) questionnaire to use in Study 3 for the study of sexual motivation were evaluated in a sample of 146 women with same-sex attraction. Overall, the reliability of this scale was excellent for casual sex motivations and motivations for sex in committed relationships with female partners. In Study 3, motivations for sex and the effects of relationship context, sexual attraction, and the gender of one’s partner were explored in a sample of 510 women including women with same-sex attraction and women with exclusively heterosexual attraction. Results of this study showed that relationship context had the largest effect on sexual motivation; physical motivations were more strongly endorsed for casual sex while emotional motivations were more strongly endorsed for sex in committed relationships. No effect of sexual attraction was reported. Further, no effect of gender of partner was reported by sexual minority women. The results of this dissertation have important implications for the study of sexual motivation, specifically as it relates to sexual attraction and orientation. Motivations for sex are likely to be affected by an individual’s attitudes and perceptions of his or her partner’s sexual orientation and associated stereotypes. In addition, the type of sexual relationship and associated level of commitment had strong, differential effects on sexual motivation. This is a novel finding as the context of the sexual relationship has not previously been considered with respect to individual motivations for sex. Henceforth, studies on sexual motivation need to be more contextualized and include more comprehensive assessments of individuals to increase the validity of findings and demonstrate the complex variation of human sexual motivation.
40

Attitudes towards bisexual men and women: the relationship between respondents' attitudes and their sexual orientation

Arndt, Marlene 19 April 2010 (has links)
D.Litt. et Phil. / This study posits that although the South African government has shown an unprecedented commitment to acknowledging and upholding the human rights of bisexual men and women, negative attitudes exist towards bisexual men and women. A mixed method research study was conducted, consisting of three phases. In the first phase of the study (quantitative), a biographical questionnaire, the Attitudes Regarding Bisexuality Scale (ARBS-FM) (Mohr & Rochlen, 1999), and the Sexual orientation scale of Berkey, Perelman-Hall and Kurdek (1990) was utilised. A total of undergraduate 1 459 students were selected by convenience sampling. However, the reliability of the scales of the ARBS-FM in this student sample appeared to be significantly lower than desired. Therefore, the researcher organised an expert group (N = 11). This second section of the study served as expert advice from cultural interpreters that brought about adaptation of the measures (qualitative) and was complementary to the quantitative study. The researcher endeavoured to seek elaboration and clarification of the results from one method with the results of the other method. In the third phase of the study a revised ARBS (consisting of two scales measuring attitudes towards bisexual men and women separately), a biographical questionnaire, and the sexual orientation scale was administered. A total of 578 undergraduate students were selected by convenience sampling. The psychometric properties of the revised ARBS instruments were investigated by means of confirmatory factor analyses. Results indicated a two-factor structure (Tolerance and Stability) for both of the ARBS-F and ARBS-M. Tucker’s coefficients of congruence showed that attitudes towards bisexual men and women may be measured by an integrated scale. Differential item functioning (DIF) and differential test functioning (DTF) analyses suggested the removal of some items that favoured either the black or the white group. The revised ARBS-F and revised ARBS-M were used for testing the stated hypotheses. The results indicated that participants’ attitudes towards bisexual men and women vary on a range of factors such as gender, religiosity, contact, and the sexual orientation of the participants. Both heterosexual and homosexual students have more negative attitudes towards bisexual men and women than bisexual students. This double discrimination by heterosexuals and the gay and lesbian community is seldom recognised or acknowledged. Therefore, the current research findings elucidate that this oppression is real, and may have negative psychological effects on bisexual men and women. The results are discussed against the background of previous studies, and suggestions for future research are made. Key words: bisexual men, bisexual women, biphobia, homophobia, heterosexism, sexual orientation, university community, survey, attitudes, students.

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