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  • About
  • The Global ETD Search service is a free service for researchers to find electronic theses and dissertations. This service is provided by the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations.
    Our metadata is collected from universities around the world. If you manage a university/consortium/country archive and want to be added, details can be found on the NDLTD website.
1

Performance modelling and evaluation of network on chip under bursty traffic : performance evaluation of communication networks using analytical and simulation models in NOCs with fat tree topology under bursty traffic with virtual channels

Ibrahim, Hatem Musbah January 2014 (has links)
Physical constrains of integrated circuits (commonly called chip) in regards to size and finite number of wires, has made the design of System-on-Chip (SoC) more interesting to study in terms of finding better solutions for the complexity of the chip-interconnections. The SoC has hundreds of Processing Elements (PEs), and a single shared bus can no longer be acceptable due to poor scalability with the system size. Networks on Chip (NoC) have been proposed as a solution to mitigate complex on-chip communication problems for complex SoCs. They consists of computational resources in the form of PE cores and switching nodes which allow PEs to communicate with each other. In the design and development of Networks on Chip, performance modelling and analysis has great theoretical and practical importance. This research is devoted to developing efficient and cost-effective analytical tools for the performance analysis and enhancement of NoCs with m-port n-tree topology under bursty traffic. Recent measurement studies have strongly verified that the traffic generated by many real-world applications in communication networks exhibits bursty and self-similar properties in nature and the message destinations are uniformly distributed. NoC's performance is generally affected by different traffic patterns generated by the processing elements. As the first step in the research, a new analytical model is developed to capture the burstiness and self-similarity characteristics of the traffic within NoCs through the use of Markov Modulated Poisson Process. The performance results of the developed model highlight the importance of accurate traffic modelling in the study and performance evaluation of NoCs. Having developed an efficient analytical tool to capture the traffic behaviour with a higher accuracy, in the next step, the research focuses on the effect of topology on the performance of NoCs. Many important challenges still remain as vulnerabilities within the design of NoCs with topology being the most important. Therefore a new analytical model is developed to investigate the performance of NoCs with the m-port n-tree topology under bursty traffic. Even though it is broadly proved in practice that fat-tree topology and its varieties result in lower latency, higher throughput and bandwidth, still most studies on NoCs adopt Mesh, Torus and Spidergon topologies. The results gained from the developed model and advanced simulation experiments significantly show the effect of fat-tree topology in reducing latency and increasing the throughput of NoCs. In order to obtain deeper understanding of NoCs performance attributes and for further improvement, in the final stage of the research, the developed analytical model was extended to consider the use of virtual channels within the architecture of NoCs. Extensive simulation experiments were carried out which show satisfactory improvements in the throughput of NoCs with fat-tree topology and VCs under bursty traffic. The analytical results and those obtained from extensive simulation experiments have shown a good degree of accuracy for predicting the network performance under different design alternatives and various traffic conditions.
2

Modeling and Analysis of Active Queue Management Schemes under Bursty Traffic.

Wang, Lan, Min, Geyong, Awan, Irfan U. January 2006 (has links)
No / Traffic congestion arising from the shared nature of uplink channels in wireless networks can cause serious problems for the provision of QoS to various services. One approach to overcome these problems is to implement some effective congestion control mechanisms at the downlink buffer at the mobile network link layer or at gateways on the behalf of wireless network access points. Active queue management (AQM) is an effective mechanism to support end-to-end traffic congestion control in modern high-speed networks. Initially developed for Internet routers, AQM is now being also considered as an effective congestion control mechanism to enhance TCP performance over 3G links. This paper proposes an analytical performance model for AQM using various dropping functions. The selection of different dropping functions and threshold values required for this scheme plays a critical role on its effectiveness. The model uses a well-known Markov-modulated Poisson process (MMPP) to capture traffic burstiness and correlations. The validity of the model has been demonstrated through simulation experiments. Extensive analytical results have indicated that exponential dropping function is a good choice for AQM to support efficient congestion control.
3

Performance Modelling and Evaluation of Network On Chip Under Bursty Traffic. Performance evaluation of communication networks using analytical and simulation models in NOCs with Fat tree topology under Bursty Traffic with virtual channels.

Ibrahim, Hatem Musbah January 2014 (has links)
Physical constrains of integrated circuits (commonly called chip) in regards to size and finite number of wires, has made the design of System-on-Chip (SoC) more interesting to study in terms of finding better solutions for the complexity of the chip-interconnections. The SoC has hundreds of Processing Elements (PEs), and a single shared bus can no longer be acceptable due to poor scalability with the system size. Networks on Chip (NoC) have been proposed as a solution to mitigate complex on-chip communication problems for complex SoCs. They consists of computational resources in the form of PE cores and switching nodes which allow PEs to communicate with each other. In the design and development of Networks on Chip, performance modelling and analysis has great theoretical and practical importance. This research is devoted to developing efficient and cost-effective analytical tools for the performance analysis and enhancement of NoCs with m-port n-tree topology under bursty traffic. Recent measurement studies have strongly verified that the traffic generated by many real-world applications in communication networks exhibits bursty and self-similar properties in nature and the message destinations are uniformly distributed. NoC's performance is generally affected by different traffic patterns generated by the processing elements. As the first step in the research, a new analytical model is developed to capture the burstiness and self-similarity characteristics of the traffic within NoCs through the use of Markov Modulated Poisson Process. The performance results of the developed model highlight the importance of accurate traffic modelling in the study and performance evaluation of NoCs. Having developed an efficient analytical tool to capture the traffic behaviour with a higher accuracy, in the next step, the research focuses on the effect of topology on the performance of NoCs. Many important challenges still remain as vulnerabilities within the design of NoCs with topology being the most important. Therefore a new analytical model is developed to investigate the performance of NoCs with the m-port n-tree topology under bursty traffic. Even though it is broadly proved in practice that fat-tree topology and its varieties result in lower latency, higher throughput and bandwidth, still most studies on NoCs adopt Mesh, Torus and Spidergon topologies. The results gained from the developed model and advanced simulation experiments significantly show the effect of fat-tree topology in reducing latency and increasing the throughput of NoCs. In order to obtain deeper understanding of NoCs performance attributes and for further improvement, in the final stage of the research, the developed analytical model was extended to consider the use of virtual channels within the architecture of NoCs. Extensive simulation experiments were carried out which show satisfactory improvements in the throughput of NoCs with fat-tree topology and VCs under bursty traffic. The analytical results and those obtained from extensive simulation experiments have shown a good degree of accuracy for predicting the network performance under different design alternatives and various traffic conditions. / Libyan Ministry of Higher Education
4

Performance modelling and evaluation of virtual channels in multicomputer networks with bursty traffic

Min, Geyong, Ould-Khaoua, M. January 2004 (has links)
No
5

Analysis of the MAC protocol in low rate wireless personal area networks with bursty ON-OFF traffic

Gao, J.L., Hu, J., Min, Geyong, Xu, L. January 2013 (has links)
No / Supported by the IEEE 802.15.4 standard, embedded sensor networks have become popular and been widely deployed in recent years. The IEEE 802.15.4 medium access control (MAC) protocol is uniquely designed to meet the desirable requirements of the low end-to-end delay, low packet loss, and low power consumption in the low rate wireless personal areas networks (LR-WPANs). This paper develops an analytical model to quantify the key performance metrics of the MAC protocol in LR-WPANs with bursty ONOFF traffic. This study fills the gap in the literature by removing the assumptions of saturated traffic or nonbursty unsaturated traffic conditions, which are unable to capture the characteristics of bursty multimedia traffic in sensor networks. This analytical model can be used to derive the QoS performance metrics in terms of throughput and total delay. The accuracy of the model is verified through NS-2 (http://www.isi.edu/nsnam/ns/) simulation experiments. This model is adopted to investigate the performance of the MAC protocol in LR-WPANs under various traffic patterns, different loads, and various numbers of stations. Numerical results show that the traffic patterns and traffic burstiness have a significant impact on the delay performance of LR-WPANs.
6

Mobile Network Traffic Modeling A Thesis Submitted To The Graduate School Of Natural And Applied Sciences Of Middle East Technical University By Yadigar Cakmak In Partial Fulfillment Of The Requirements For The Degree Of Master Of Science In El

Cakmak, Yadigar 01 January 2005 (has links) (PDF)
The aim of this thesis is to investigate the traffic patterns in the mobile data networks. In this work, a simple Cellular Digital Packet Data (CDPD) network was modeled in order to be used in simulations. For the purpose of using in the CDPD model, a synthetic bursty traffic model was produced and using different traffic patterns some performance investigations were made in CDPD network. During the whole work, OPNET simulation tool was used. The CDPD network modeled by OPNET simulation tool was compared with a CDPD model described in the literature and the differences were shown. The new model has some new features: 1) Burst transmission of MAC blocks. 2) Exponential backoff. 3) New packet structures. 4) Frame segmentation and encapsulation into MAC layer frames. Using OPNET, a traffic having higher level of burstiness was produced and applied to the CDPD network model. Under the bursty traffic, some CDPD performance parameters were collected and according to the collected results some suggestions were given.
7

Performance modelling and evaluation of heterogeneous wired/wireless networks under bursty traffic : analytical models for performance analysis of communication networks in multi-computer systems, multi-cluster systems, and integrated wireless systems

Yulei, W. U. January 2010 (has links)
Computer networks can be classified into two broad categories: wired networks and wireless networks, according to the hardware and software technologies used to interconnect the individual devices. Wired interconnection networks are hardware fabrics supporting communications between individual processors in highperformance computing systems (e.g., multi-computer systems and cluster systems). On the other hand, due to the rapid development of wireless technologies, wireless networks have emerged and become an indispensable part for people's lives. The integration of different wireless technologies is an effective approach to accommodate the increasing demand of the users to communicate with each other and access the Internet. This thesis aims to investigate the performance of wired interconnection networks and integrated wireless networks under the realistic working conditions. Traffic patterns have a significant impact on network performance. A number of recent measurement studies have convincingly demonstrated that the traffic generated by many real-world applications in communication networks exhibits bursty arrival nature and the message destinations are non-uniformly distributed. Analytical models for the performance evaluation of wired interconnection networks and integrated wireless networks have been widely reported. However, most of these models are developed under the simplified assumption of non-bursty Poisson process with uniformly distributed message destinations. To fill this gap, this thesis first presents an analytical model to investigate the performance of wired interconnection networks in multi-computer systems. Secondly, the analytical models for wired interconnection networks in multi-cluster systems are developed. Finally, this thesis proposes analytical models to evaluate the end-to-end delay and throughput of integrated wireless local area networks and wireless mesh networks. These models are derived when the networks are subject to bursty traffic with non-uniformly distributed message destinations which can capture the burstiness of real-world network traffic in the both temporal domain and spatial domain. Extensive simulation experiments are conducted to validate the accuracy of the analytical models. The models are then used as practical and cost-effective tools to investigate the performance of heterogeneous wired or wireless networks under the traffic patterns exhibited by real-world applications.
8

Performance Modeling And Evaluation Of Network Processors

Govind, S 12 1900 (has links)
In recent years there has been an exponential growth in Internet traffic resulting in increased network bandwidth requirements which, in turn, has led to stringent processing requirements on network layer devices like routers. Present backbone routers on OC 48 links (2.5Gbps) have to process four million minimum-sized packets per second. Further, the functionality supported in the network devices is also on the increase leading to programmable processors, such as Intel's IXP, Motorola's C5 and IBM's.NP. These processors support multiple processors and multiple threads to exploit packet-level-parallelism inherent in network workloads. This thesis studies the performance of network processors. We develop a Petri Net model for a commercial network processors (Intel IXP 2400,2850) for three different applications viz., IPv4 forwarding, Network Address Translation and IP security protocols. A salient feature of the Petri net model is its ability to model the application, architecture and their interaction in great detail. The model is validated using the intel proprietary tool (SDK 3.51 for IXP architecture) over a range of configurations. Our Performance evaluation results indicate that 1. The IXP processor is able to support a throughput of 2.5 Gbps for all modeled applications. 2. Packet buffer memory (DRAM) is the bottleneck resource in a network proces sor and even multithreading is ineffective beyond a total of 16 threads in case of header processing applications and beyond 32 threads for payload processing applications. Since DRAM is the bottleneck resource we explore the benefits of increasing the DRAM banks and other software schemes like offloading the packet header to SRAM. The second part of the thesis studies the impact of parallel processing in network processor on packet reordering and retransmission. Our results indicate that the concurrent processing of packets in a network processor and buffer allocation schemes in TFIFO leads to a significant packet reordering, (61%), on a 10-hop network (with packet sizes of 64 B) which in turn leads to a 76% retransmission under the TCP fast-restransmission algorithm. We explore different transmit buffer allocation schemes namely, contiguous, strided, local, and global for transmit buffer which reduces the packet retransmission to 24%. Our performance results also indicate that limiting the number of microengines can reduce the extent of packet reordering while providing the same throughput. We propose an alternative scheme, Packetsort, which guarantees complete packet ordering while achieving a throughput of 2.5 Gbps. Further, we observe that Packetsort outperforms, by up to 35%, the in-built schemes in the IXP processor namely, Inter Thread Signaling (ITS) and Asynchronous Insert and Synchronous Remove (AISR). The final part of this thesis investigates the performance of the network processor in a bursty traffic scenario. We model bursty traffic using a Pareto distribution. We consider a parallel and pipelined buffering schemes and their impact on packet drop under bursty traffic. Our results indicate that the pipelined buffering scheme outperforms the parallel scheme.
9

Performance modelling and evaluation of heterogeneous wired / wireless networks under Bursty Traffic. Analytical models for performance analysis of communication networks in multi-computer systems, multi-cluster systems, and integrated wireless systems.

Yulei, W.U. January 2010 (has links)
Computer networks can be classified into two broad categories: wired networks and wireless networks, according to the hardware and software technologies used to interconnect the individual devices. Wired interconnection networks are hardware fabrics supporting communications between individual processors in highperformance computing systems (e.g., multi-computer systems and cluster systems). On the other hand, due to the rapid development of wireless technologies, wireless networks have emerged and become an indispensable part for people¿s lives. The integration of different wireless technologies is an effective approach to accommodate the increasing demand of the users to communicate with each other and access the Internet. This thesis aims to investigate the performance of wired interconnection networks and integrated wireless networks under the realistic working conditions. Traffic patterns have a significant impact on network performance. A number of recent measurement studies have convincingly demonstrated that the traffic generated by many real-world applications in communication networks exhibits bursty arrival nature and the message destinations are non-uniformly distributed. Analytical models for the performance evaluation of wired interconnection networks and integrated wireless networks have been widely reported. However, most of these models are developed under the simplified assumption of non-bursty Poisson process with uniformly distributed message destinations. To fill this gap, this thesis first presents an analytical model to investigate the performance of wired interconnection networks in multi-computer systems. Secondly, the analytical models for wired interconnection networks in multi-cluster systems are developed. Finally, this thesis proposes analytical models to evaluate the end-to-end delay and throughput of integrated wireless local area networks and wireless mesh networks. These models are derived when the networks are subject to bursty traffic with non-uniformly distributed message destinations which can capture the burstiness of real-world network traffic in the both temporal domain and spatial domain. Extensive simulation experiments are conducted to validate the accuracy of the analytical models. The models are then used as practical and cost-effective tools to investigate the performance of heterogeneous wired or wireless networks under the traffic patterns exhibited by real-world applications.
10

Performance modeling of congestion control and resource allocation under heterogeneous network traffic : modeling and analysis of active queue management mechanism in the presence of poisson and bursty traffic arrival processes

Wang, Lan January 2010 (has links)
Along with playing an ever-increasing role in the integration of other communication networks and expanding in application diversities, the current Internet suffers from serious overuse and congestion bottlenecks. Efficient congestion control is fundamental to ensure the Internet reliability, satisfy the specified Quality-of-Service (QoS) constraints and achieve desirable performance in response to varying application scenarios. Active Queue Management (AQM) is a promising scheme to support end-to-end Transmission Control Protocol (TCP) congestion control because it enables the sender to react appropriately to the real network situation. Analytical performance models are powerful tools which can be adopted to investigate optimal setting of AQM parameters. Among the existing research efforts in this field, however, there is a current lack of analytical models that can be viewed as a cost-effective performance evaluation tool for AQM in the presence of heterogeneous traffic, generated by various network applications. This thesis aims to provide a generic and extensible analytical framework for analyzing AQM congestion control for various traffic types, such as non-bursty Poisson and bursty Markov-Modulated Poisson Process (MMPP) traffic. Specifically, the Markov analytical models are developed for AQM congestion control scheme coupled with queue thresholds and then are adopted to derive expressions for important QoS metrics. The main contributions of this thesis are listed as follows: • Study the queueing systems for modeling AQM scheme subject to single-class and multiple-classes Poisson traffic, respectively. Analyze the effects of the varying threshold, mean traffic arrival rate, service rate and buffer capacity on the key performance metrics. • Propose an analytical model for AQM scheme with single class bursty traffic and investigate how burstiness and correlations affect the performance metrics. The analytical results reveal that high burstiness and correlation can result in significant degradation of AQM performance, such as increased queueing delay and packet loss probability, and reduced throughput and utlization. • Develop an analytical model for a single server queueing system with AQM in the presence of heterogeneous traffic and evaluate the aggregate and marginal performance subject to different threshold values, burstiness degree and correlation. • Conduct stochastic analysis of a single-server system with single-queue and multiple-queues, respectively, for AQM scheme in the presence of multiple priority traffic classes scheduled by the Priority Resume (PR) policy. • Carry out the performance comparison of AQM with PR and First-In First-Out (FIFO) scheme and compare the performance of AQM with single PR priority queue and multiple priority queues, respectively.

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