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  • About
  • The Global ETD Search service is a free service for researchers to find electronic theses and dissertations. This service is provided by the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations.
    Our metadata is collected from universities around the world. If you manage a university/consortium/country archive and want to be added, details can be found on the NDLTD website.
1

Rewriting Art History in Eastern Europe. Review of Art History on the Disciplinary Map in East-Central Europe

Ghiu, Daria 31 March 2011 (has links) (PDF)
No description available.
2

51. Oktobarski Salon. Noć nam prija... (51st October Salon. The Night Pleases Us...)

Renz, Seraina 31 March 2011 (has links) (PDF)
No description available.
3

Jet lag, oder vom Unbehagen eines Mythos. Zur Ausstellung Promises of the Past: A Discontinuous History of Art in Former Eastern Europe

Kapustka, Mateusz 31 March 2011 (has links) (PDF)
No description available.
4

Art Histories, Cultural Studies and the Cold War / Cold War Cities

Puth, Andreas 31 March 2011 (has links) (PDF)
No description available.
5

Art Histories, Cultural Studies and the Cold War / Cold War Cities

Puth, Andreas 31 March 2011 (has links) (PDF)
No description available.
6

Im Dienst der “Arbeiter- und Bauernmacht”: Der Aufbau der Nordistik in der DDR

Muschik, Alexander 15 December 2004 (has links) (PDF)
The existence of the German Democratic Republic (GDR) was confirmed by the declaration of its sovereignty and its membership in the Pact of Warsaw in 1954/55. After that, the new state soon developed lively political activities towards the western countries in order to get internationally recognized. But the fact that the West German government claimed to be the only representation of all Germany made it almost impossible for the GDR to improve its position in the western world. The Scandinavian countries, especially the neutral states Finland and Sweden, played quite an important role for East German foreign policy. The GDR saw in these countries better possibilities than elsewhere to undermine the western non-recognition policy. That is why the Socialist Unity Party (SED) supported the idea of re-founding the traditional Institute for Northern Studies at the University of Greifswald in the mid-fifties. The aim of the institute was first of all a political one: apart from the education of cadres as well as the research on political, economical, historical and philological questions concerning Scandinavia, the institute was supposed to create cultural and scientific contacts with the northern countries in order to prepare in longer terms the establishing of political relations.
7

Im Dienst der “Arbeiter- und Bauernmacht”: Der Aufbau der Nordistik in der DDR

Muschik, Alexander 15 December 2004 (has links)
The existence of the German Democratic Republic (GDR) was confirmed by the declaration of its sovereignty and its membership in the Pact of Warsaw in 1954/55. After that, the new state soon developed lively political activities towards the western countries in order to get internationally recognized. But the fact that the West German government claimed to be the only representation of all Germany made it almost impossible for the GDR to improve its position in the western world. The Scandinavian countries, especially the neutral states Finland and Sweden, played quite an important role for East German foreign policy. The GDR saw in these countries better possibilities than elsewhere to undermine the western non-recognition policy. That is why the Socialist Unity Party (SED) supported the idea of re-founding the traditional Institute for Northern Studies at the University of Greifswald in the mid-fifties. The aim of the institute was first of all a political one: apart from the education of cadres as well as the research on political, economical, historical and philological questions concerning Scandinavia, the institute was supposed to create cultural and scientific contacts with the northern countries in order to prepare in longer terms the establishing of political relations.
8

Parade der Heimlichtuer: Schwedische Geheimdienste und die Wissenschaft

Åmark, Klas 15 December 2000 (has links)
Contrary to the careful refined image regarding the freedom of information and transparency, Sweden has practised extensive secrecy on important political fields. This does not only refer to problems relating to the politics of neutrality, but also concerning the surveillance of parts of the Swedish left by the intelligence services. In spite of numerous exposures and scandals which were made public through journalists and historical research, a serious revelation and examination of the system and methods of this observations has been long awaited. A wide debate in science and in the public is strongly needed – the public should not be left in the dark with the help of limited information of involved authorities and politicians, or restrictions to relevant material.
9

Parade der Heimlichtuer: Schwedische Geheimdienste und die Wissenschaft

Åmark, Klas 15 December 2000 (has links) (PDF)
Contrary to the careful refined image regarding the freedom of information and transparency, Sweden has practised extensive secrecy on important political fields. This does not only refer to problems relating to the politics of neutrality, but also concerning the surveillance of parts of the Swedish left by the intelligence services. In spite of numerous exposures and scandals which were made public through journalists and historical research, a serious revelation and examination of the system and methods of this observations has been long awaited. A wide debate in science and in the public is strongly needed – the public should not be left in the dark with the help of limited information of involved authorities and politicians, or restrictions to relevant material.
10

Kalter Kulturkrieg in Norwegen? Zum Wirken des "Kongreß für kulturelle Freiheit" in Skandinavien

Hannemann, Matthias 15 December 1999 (has links)
Tracing the international network of the "Congress for Cultural Freedom" (CCF): Did the norwegian socialdemocrat Haakon Lie establish anticommunist propaganda in Norway after 1950? Several CCF-reports and letters comment on Lies work in Norway, and even his famous book "Kaderpartiet" (1954) seems to have been published with the help of the CCF – and the money of the CIA. While Lie left the CCF in the middle of the 1950s, Willy Brandt, who had introduced Haakon Lie to the CCF-staff in Berlin, recognized several difficulties concerning the CCF's work in Scandinavia. As late as in 1960, the CCF asked Lars Roar Langslet and his conservative student magazine "Minervas kvartalsskrift" to publish some articles and organize some conferences in Oslo. Was there a "Cold Cultural War in the North?" or were people like Haakon Lie, Willy Brandt or Lars Roar Langslet speaking up against totalitarism without "being told", just being supported by the "Congress of Cultural Freedom"?

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