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  • About
  • The Global ETD Search service is a free service for researchers to find electronic theses and dissertations. This service is provided by the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations.
    Our metadata is collected from universities around the world. If you manage a university/consortium/country archive and want to be added, details can be found on the NDLTD website.
1

Quid de iterata Medeae Euripideae editione sit judicandum ...

Klette, Theodor Adolf Johann, January 1875 (has links)
Inaug.-diss.-Leipzig. / Vita.
2

The character of Medea: an interpretation for the stage

Jackson, Susan Carter, 1939- January 1964 (has links)
No description available.
3

Die Darstellung von dem Frauenbild Medeas : Eine Untersuchung von dem Medeabild in drei verschiedenen Fassungen

Dahlberg, Camilla January 2009 (has links)
<p> </p><p>In this Thesis three different versions of the Medea myth are analysed. They stem from the Antique, the 19<sup>th</sup> century and the 20<sup>th</sup> century, respectively. Analyses are made of how the female image of Medea is portrayed and if different historical perceptions of woman are being projected in the female image of Medea. The development of the myth and the drama is also being presented showing how it can influence the image of Medea.</p><p>In Euripides version from the Antique, Medea is shown as both a human and with a more supernatural side. This is also typical for myths from these times. However, what sets Euripides apart from other stories from that age is that it contains a female protagonist with a strong character. In Franz Grillparzers story from the 19<sup>th</sup> century, Medea is still portrayed having a strong and independent nature, albeit no longer with supernatural properties. Instead she is driven by traditional human romantic characteristics displayed by her love towards Jason. In the version written by Christa Wolf, Medea is portrayed as a strong independent woman as in the other versions, albeit misunderstood by the society surrounding her. Her emancipated character becomes evident by the cultural differences displayed by Medea on one hand and society on the other hand. Also, Christa Wolf rewrites the myth into a novel and incorporates other aspects to the story such as a profound Scapegoat theme, by some described as a rewriting of the myth by incorporating personal experiences into the story.</p><p>However, the main character of Medea - her independence and strong character is a common denominator in all the three stories.</p><p> </p><p> </p><p> </p><p> </p><p> </p>
4

Die Darstellung von dem Frauenbild Medeas : Eine Untersuchung von dem Medeabild in drei verschiedenen Fassungen

Dahlberg, Camilla January 2009 (has links)
In this Thesis three different versions of the Medea myth are analysed. They stem from the Antique, the 19th century and the 20th century, respectively. Analyses are made of how the female image of Medea is portrayed and if different historical perceptions of woman are being projected in the female image of Medea. The development of the myth and the drama is also being presented showing how it can influence the image of Medea. In Euripides version from the Antique, Medea is shown as both a human and with a more supernatural side. This is also typical for myths from these times. However, what sets Euripides apart from other stories from that age is that it contains a female protagonist with a strong character. In Franz Grillparzers story from the 19th century, Medea is still portrayed having a strong and independent nature, albeit no longer with supernatural properties. Instead she is driven by traditional human romantic characteristics displayed by her love towards Jason. In the version written by Christa Wolf, Medea is portrayed as a strong independent woman as in the other versions, albeit misunderstood by the society surrounding her. Her emancipated character becomes evident by the cultural differences displayed by Medea on one hand and society on the other hand. Also, Christa Wolf rewrites the myth into a novel and incorporates other aspects to the story such as a profound Scapegoat theme, by some described as a rewriting of the myth by incorporating personal experiences into the story. However, the main character of Medea - her independence and strong character is a common denominator in all the three stories.
5

Medea--monster and victim : the representation of Medea's image in the works of Euripides, Seneca, Corneille, Anouilh and Pasolini /

Kruk, Magdalena, January 2007 (has links)
Thesis (M.A.) -- Central Connecticut State University, 2007. / Thesis advisor: Louis Auld. "... in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Arts in French." Includes bibliographical references (leaves 61-64). Also available via the World Wide Web.
6

De Medeae mytho apud antiquos scriptores et artifices,

Goedhart, Johannes Hendrik. January 1911 (has links)
Thesis (doctoral)--Leiden, 1911.
7

Conflicting aspects of character in Euripides' Medea

05 June 2008 (has links)
Medea’s powerful ability to inspire and confuse is at the core of this study. The contradiction concerning Euripides’ character of Medea as a murderer and a victim will be explored in order to understand what implications this would have held for an ancient Greek audience. Thus the irregularities in this female character will be used to indicate the inconsistencies within the society from which Euripides was writing. Women’s lack of freedom in ancient Greece, their confinement to the house and their lack of opportunity to voice their opinions and concerns produced an imbalance in society. This masculine community led to extremes in behaviour. Male heroes overemphasised traits which stressed their physical prowess and masculine bravery. As a hero, Jason’s all-consuming ambition was to succeed in endeavours such as the quest for the Golden Fleece, and to reclaim his title of king. He took advantage of Medea’s gifts until she was no longer of any use to him and then left her for a younger, more beneficial princess to accomplish his subsequent task of gaining a kingdom. Medea’s excessive behaviour was a protest against her position as supportive wife when she found that Jason had neglected his obligation as a protective husband. Euripides’ tragedy was a rebellion against a cultural definition of men and women which did not work. Men were pressured into being the sole providers and authorities over a whole household, whereas women were relegated to the status of possessions. The situation generally suited men, but women were not given a choice of career and had their marriage prearranged by their fathers. More importantly they were not provided with an opportunity to voice their displeasure and were in the hands of fate, whether they attained a kind or a cruel husband. This study argues that by challenging the definition of heroes and victims, Euripides questioned the preconceived perceptions of the nature of women and foreigners. He was also commenting on social restriction and the possible consequences of restraining women’s behaviour and their opinions. / Prof. J.L.P. Wolmarans
8

Dracontius Romul. 10 (Medea) : Einleitung, Text, Übersetzung und Kommentar /

Kaufmann, Helen. January 1900 (has links)
Texte remanié de: Dissertation--Philosophie--Freiburg in der Schweiz, 2005. / Bibliogr. p. 469-499.
9

Motivation in Medeatragödien der Antike und der Neuzeit

Schmierer, Britta January 2004 (has links)
Zugl.: Stuttgart, Univ., Diss., 2004
10

Mythos als Zivilisationskritik: Die Pragmatisierung einer erweiterten negativen Dialektik in Werken Heiner Müllers

Zimmermann, Nora 27 October 2016 (has links)
This thesis analyzes three works of the GDR dramatist Heiner Müller: his early prose poem Orpheus gepflügt, his learning play Mauser, and his late piece Verkommenes Ufer Medeamaterial Landschaft mit Argonauten. It demonstrates how Müller, throughout different career stages, pragmatizes myth to further critical thinking. Ancient Greek myths and Christian symbolism play a crucial role in Müller’s strategy of calling into question the very systems that lay claim to an absolute truth. Müller both alludes to and openly employs myths to identify their inherent dialectical tension operative in everyday life as well as in secular explanatory models used to legitimize political agendas. He expands Theodor W. Adorno’s concept of negative dialectics through an emphasis on the mythical pole of the dialectical dyad “myth and enlightenment.” By drawing attention to myths inherent in civilization, Müller opens up space for the imagination and the potential of the irrational to initiate change.

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