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  • About
  • The Global ETD Search service is a free service for researchers to find electronic theses and dissertations. This service is provided by the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations.
    Our metadata is collected from universities around the world. If you manage a university/consortium/country archive and want to be added, details can be found on the NDLTD website.
31

A study on whole school approach to discipline in a Hong Kong secondary school

Chung, Wing-keung., 鍾永強. January 1997 (has links)
published_or_final_version / Education / Master / Master of Education
32

District Leadership and Systemic Inclusion: A Case Study of One Inclusive, Effective School District

Unknown Date (has links)
Inclusion is a federal education policy in the United States that challenges educational leaders. Despite U.S. federal laws requiring an inclusive education for students with disabilities (SWD), educators continue to struggle to implement inclusion. Some scholars argue that leadership is the key to inclusion, with most studies focused on principal leadership. Successful inclusive districts are rare, as are studies of these districts. The purpose of this in-depth case study was to describe and understand the leadership practices of SSSD (pseudonym), an inclusive (based on LRE ≥75% for three consecutive years) and effective district (based on district grades of As and Bs, state measures of student achievement) in Southeast Florida. Within SSSD, a purposeful sample of 31 participants was selected that included eight district leaders, three principals, 15 teachers, and five parents located at four sites and observed across three events over the span of one semester with multiple supporting documents analyzed. Four findings describing district leadership practices emerged from the data analysis; 1) a shared inclusive mission, 2) collaborative efforts, 3) formal and informal professional development (PD), and 4) acknowledging and addressing challenges. The practices of district leaders found in this study resonate with other findings in the literature and contribute two of the new findings in this study: 1) the superintendent’s attitudes, beliefs, and experiences as a special educator were described as key to her district’s inclusive focus and success and extends previous research connecting principal leadership to school site inclusion; and 2) informal versus formal PD was more beneficial to teachers in building collective capacity for inclusive service delivery—marking a new distinction within related PD literature. Recommendations to district leaders, policy makers, and scholars are included. The study concludes by encouraging educational leaders to cultivate a shared inclusive mission implemented through collaborative efforts. There is hope for inclusion, not only in theory, but in practice, mirroring the call of other district leadership studies of successful, systemic inclusion. / Includes bibliography. / Dissertation (Ph.D.)--Florida Atlantic University, 2017. / FAU Electronic Theses and Dissertations Collection
33

A comparative, holistic, multi-case study of the implementation of the Strategic Thinking Protocolà and traditional strategic planning processes at a southeastern university

Unknown Date (has links)
This study explores the strategic thinking and strategic planning efforts in a department, college and university in the southeastern United States. The goal of the study was to identify elements of strategic planning processes that meet the unique organizational features and complexities of a higher education institution. The study employed a holistic, multi-case study approach, wherein three single case studies were conducted with one unit of analysis. The findings in each case were then compared and contrasted to provide more evidence and confidence in the findings. The findings are framed by two constructs : strategic planning and strategic thinking. The conceptual framework for the study identified the distinction between the systematic nature of strategic planning and the more integrated perspective of strategic thinking. Traditional business based strategic planning model uses an analytical process, logic, linear thinking and a calculating process to develop a plan. Strategi c thinking places a premium on synthesis, systems thinking and a social cognitive process that results in an integrated perspective of the organization. The resluts of this study indicate that the use of the Strategic Thinking Protocolà is suitable for higher education organizations to create a learning environment, to implement creative and emergent strategies, that result in the organization's positioning and responses to a rapidly changing environment. The strategic thinking process in both the department and college cases were found to be effective in altering the attitudes, values, beliefs and behaviors of the participants. The integration of the plan is an ongoing process with strong beginnings in both the department and college cases. / The traditional strategic planning process used in the university case was found not to be an effective model for higher education organizations. Finally, the inclusion of strategic thinking elements is an effective change model for higher education institutions. / by Deborah J. Robinson. / Thesis (Ph.D.)--Florida Atlantic University, 2012. / Includes bibliography. / Electronic reproduction. Boca Raton, Fla., 2012. Mode of access: World Wide Web.
34

學校組織變革硏究: 特殊學校電腦輔助敎學的個案. / School organizational change: a case study of computer-assisted instruction in a special school / CUHK electronic theses & dissertations collection / Xue xiao zu zhi bian ge yan jiu: te shu xue xiao dian nao fu zhu jiao xue de ge an.

January 1998 (has links)
伍國雄. / 論文(博士)--香港中文大學敎育學部, 1998. / 附參考文獻. / 附英文摘要. / Available also through the Internet via Dissertations & theses @ Chinese University of Hong Kong. / Electronic reproduction. Hong Kong : Chinese University of Hong Kong, [2012] System requirements: Adobe Acrobat Reader. Available via World Wide Web. / Mode of access: World Wide Web. / Wu Guoxiong. / Lun wen (Bo shi)--Xianggang Zhong wen da xue jiao yu xue bu, 1998. / Fu can kao wen xian. / Zhong Ying wen zhai yao.
35

Perception of school climate on a local newly established secondary school

Leung, Moon-chuen., 梁滿泉. January 1999 (has links)
published_or_final_version / Education / Master / Master of Education
36

Development of organizational commitment in Hong Kong aided secondary school Christian teachers: a case study.

January 1991 (has links)
Leung Ting Chor. / Thesis (M.A.Ed.) -- Chinese University of Hong Kong, 1991. / Bibliography: leaves 142-147. / ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS --- p.I / LIST OF FIGURES --- p.II / LIST OF TABLES --- p.III / ABSTRACT --- p.IV / Chapter CHAPTER I --- Introduction --- p.1 / General description of the area of concern --- p.1 / Background of study --- p.2 / Purpose of study and its problem --- p.5 / Significance of the study --- p.6 / Chapter CHAPTER II --- Literature Review and Theoretical Framework --- p.9 / Concept of organizational commitment --- p.9 / Competing definitions of commitment --- p.9 / Definition of organizational commitment --- p.11 / Antecedents of organizational commitment --- p.11 / Concept of needs and values --- p.15 / Concept of needs --- p.15 / Concept of values --- p.18 / Expectancy models of motivation --- p.19 / Theoretical framework of this study --- p.21 / Conceptualization --- p.21 / Research questions --- p.26 / Propositions --- p.29 / Chapter CHAPTER III --- Methodology --- p.36 / Research method --- p.36 / Collection of data --- p.38 / Choice of cases --- p.38 / Choice of school --- p.40 / Data management --- p.41 / Validation --- p.42 / Interview questionnaire --- p.44 / Data analysis --- p.45 / Limitations --- p.46 / Chapter CHAPTER IV --- Analysis and Discussion --- p.48 / Description of the school --- p.48 / Description of the subjects --- p.50 / Teachers at the early employment career stage --- p.50 / Teachers at the middle career stage --- p.52 / Teachers at the late career stage --- p.54 / Pattern for the development of organizational commitment --- p.56 / Perception of teacher roles --- p.56 / Satisfaction in teaching --- p.77 / Acceptance for the school --- p.81 / Organizational commitment of the teachers --- p.122 / Chapter CHAPTER V --- "Conclusion, Implications and Recommendations" --- p.131 / Conclusion --- p.131 / Implications for further study --- p.138 / Recommendations --- p.140 / BIBLIOGRAPHY --- p.142 / APPENDICES / Chapter Appendix I --- Interview Questionnaire --- p.148 / Chapter Appendix II --- Interview Transcript --- p.150 / Chapter Appendix III --- Notations used in this study --- p.151 / Chapter Appendix IV --- Summary of propositions --- p.152 / Chapter Appendix V --- Categories of codes --- p.153
37

The impact of change of principal on organizational culture: a case study of teachers' perception in aHong Kong secondary school

Chan, Tsui-kum., 陳翠琴. January 1997 (has links)
published_or_final_version / Education / Master / Master of Education
38

A critical evaluation of the roles and strategies of civil society organisations in development : a case study of Planact in Johannesburg

Kapundu, Anny Kalingwishi 06 1900 (has links)
The rise of civil society organisations in South Africa is crucial to development as it contributes to the bridging of the communication gap between civil society and local government organisations and municipalities and promotes access to resources. The contribution of civil society organisations to development has been widely acknowledged as they are involved in service delivery, advocacy, innovation and poverty reduction initiatives. In spite of the development work done by civil society organisations in developing countries, they still face challenges in promoting development as poverty, inequality and unemployment persist. This research focused on the social capital approach as a strategy for the development of local communities in South Africa. The social capital approach involves increasing social stability and enhancement of development issues. Social capital relies on the basic idea that “it is not what you know but who you know”. Social capital refers mostly to social cohesion, which makes a community more committed to better living conditions for all. People in communities have the capacity to improve the quality of their lives with the support of all sectors, civil society, the state and the market by letting the people in communities get involved in all the stages of the programmes because they know better from living in those communities. Civil society organisations can meaningfully add value to economic and social development in any third world country through their work. The government, the market and civil society can complement each other and add value to the development of the country. This study employed a qualitative research design. It used in-depth interviews, direct observation and focus-group interviews to collect data, which was later transcribed and analysed thematically. The main focus of this study was to critically evaluate the roles and strategies of civil society organisations in the development of South African communities, using Planact as a case study. The specific objectives were to: 1) To explore the role Planact plays in development in Johannesburg; 2) To evaluate how Planact uses social capital as a strategy in promoting development if at all; 3) To explore the challenges of civil society organisations, particularly that of Planact in the development process of poor communities and 4) To make possible recommendations in the light of the roles and strategies of civil societies identified in analysing Planact ‘s strategy in development process for the poor. This study found that as a civil society organisation Planact is acting as a voice for the voiceless through its advocacy programme. It contributes to policy making, good governance and accountability. In addition, Planact promotes participation and assists in education and training. Planact uses different strategies to promote development in the community, such as mentoring, promoting integrated human settlement, using technology in networking, encouraging participation, community economic development and social organisation. Furthermore, the organisation uses forums, awareness campaigns and empowerment as strategies to promote development in the community. However, the study found that the organisation faces challenges because of limited funding. The community also encounters certain challenges as they engage with the organisation, for example, lack of accountability, unresponsiveness and inaccessibility. It was noted that civil society organisations should adopt a higher priority in development planning and practice and should allow the participation of poor people in the development process. / Development Studies / M.A. (S.S.)

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