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  • About
  • The Global ETD Search service is a free service for researchers to find electronic theses and dissertations. This service is provided by the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations.
    Our metadata is collected from universities around the world. If you manage a university/consortium/country archive and want to be added, details can be found on the NDLTD website.
21

Privatisation and deregulation policies in South Africa.

Mfuku, Nkosana 2006 (has links)

This research report examined the key policies of globalisation namely, privatisation and deregulation of services and also their implication on the Tri-partite alliance. Because they have impacted negatively on major economic sectors, particularly to those that help the needy. Therefore, the study explores these initiatives, which has been debatable in South Africa under the dominant understanding of &lsquo progress&rsquo or &lsquo development&rsquo .


The Objective of the study is to lay the basis for the examination and evaluation of policy option with regard to privatisation and deregulation of services in South Africa and to engage South Africa effectively in global policy debates and adjust in global trends and negotiations within the region (SADC) and other international countries. It examines global challenges and opportunities / threats for South Africa as a developing country in the emerging global order.


This study also attempts to provide answers to several questions concerning privatisation and deregulation of public services in South Africa. To the poor, is deregulation and privatisation of state assets threatening to become the new apartheid, which is an instrument of exclusion, not just from a better life but even from the very basic services? How are workers and including the poorest of the poor affected by the status of deregulation and privatisation? Do the timing and specifics of these processes matter? Who should attempt to regulate the auction, as some of government officials seems to be corrupt? And which prior restructuring policies are worth implementing?

22

Petrographic characterization of sandstones in borehole E-BA1, Block 9, Bredasdorp Basin, Off-Shore South Africa.

Van Bloemenstein, Chantell Berenice 2006 (has links)

The reservoir quality (RQ) of well E-BA1 was characterized using thin sections and core samples in a petrographic study. Well E-BA1 is situated in the Bredasdorp Basin, which forms part of the Outeniqua Basin situated in the Southern Afircan offshore region. Rifting as a result of the break up of Gondwanaland formed the Outeniqua Basin. The Bredasorp Basin is characterized by half-graben structures comprised of Upper Jurassic, Lower Cretaceous and Cenozoic rift to drift strata. The current research within the thesis has indicated that well E-BA1 is one of moderate to good quality having a gas-condensate component.

23

Privatisation and deregulation policies in South Africa.

Mfuku, Nkosana 2006 (has links)

This research report examined the key policies of globalisation namely, privatisation and deregulation of services and also their implication on the Tri-partite alliance. Because they have impacted negatively on major economic sectors, particularly to those that help the needy. Therefore, the study explores these initiatives, which has been debatable in South Africa under the dominant understanding of &lsquo progress&rsquo or &lsquo development&rsquo .


The Objective of the study is to lay the basis for the examination and evaluation of policy option with regard to privatisation and deregulation of services in South Africa and to engage South Africa effectively in global policy debates and adjust in global trends and negotiations within the region (SADC) and other international countries. It examines global challenges and opportunities / threats for South Africa as a developing country in the emerging global order.


This study also attempts to provide answers to several questions concerning privatisation and deregulation of public services in South Africa. To the poor, is deregulation and privatisation of state assets threatening to become the new apartheid, which is an instrument of exclusion, not just from a better life but even from the very basic services? How are workers and including the poorest of the poor affected by the status of deregulation and privatisation? Do the timing and specifics of these processes matter? Who should attempt to regulate the auction, as some of government officials seems to be corrupt? And which prior restructuring policies are worth implementing?

24

Petrographic characterization of sandstones in borehole E-BA1, Block 9, Bredasdorp Basin, Off-Shore South Africa.

Van Bloemenstein, Chantell Berenice 2006 (has links)

The reservoir quality (RQ) of well E-BA1 was characterized using thin sections and core samples in a petrographic study. Well E-BA1 is situated in the Bredasdorp Basin, which forms part of the Outeniqua Basin situated in the Southern Afircan offshore region. Rifting as a result of the break up of Gondwanaland formed the Outeniqua Basin. The Bredasorp Basin is characterized by half-graben structures comprised of Upper Jurassic, Lower Cretaceous and Cenozoic rift to drift strata. The current research within the thesis has indicated that well E-BA1 is one of moderate to good quality having a gas-condensate component.

25

Experimental and computational studies of a fungal chitinase

Khan, Faez Iqbal 2015 (has links)
Submitted in fulfillment of the requirements of the degree of Doctor of Philosophy: Chemistry, Durban University of Technology, 2015. Chitin, the second most abundant natural biopolymer, is composed of repeating units of N-acetyl-β-D-glucosamine and primarily forms the structural component of protective biological matrices such as fungal cell walls and exoskeletons of insects. Chitinases are a ubiquitous class of extracellular enzymes that have gained attention in the past few years due to their wide range of biotechnological applications, especially in the field of agriculture for bio-control of fungal phytopathogens. They play an important role in the defense of organisms against chitin-containing parasites by hydrolyzing the β-1,4-linkages in chitin and hence act as anti-fungal as well as anti-biofouling agents. Moreover, the effectiveness of conventional insecticides is increasingly compromised by the occurrence of resistance and thus, chitinases offer a potential alternative to the use of chemical fungicides. In recent years, thermostable enzymes isolated from thermophilic microorganisms have gained widespread attention in industrial, medical, environmental and biotechnological applications due to their inherent stability at high temperatures and a wide range of pH optima. Determination of the three- dimensional structure of a protein can provide important details about its biological functions and its mode of action. However, despite their significance, the precise three-dimensional structures of most of the chitinases, including those isolated from Thermomyces lanuginosus is not fully characterized so far. Hence, the main focus of the present study was to gain a better understanding of the structural features of chitinases obtained from this thermostable fungus using both experimental and computational techniques, and their relationship with their activity profiles. The genes encoding thermostable chitinase II from T. lanuginosus were isolated and cloned in both E. coli as well as the Pichia pastoris expression system. Analysis of the nucleotide sequences revealed that the chitinase II gene (1196 bp) encodes a 343 amino acid protein of molecular weight 36.65 kDa whereas the chitinase I gene (1538 bp) encodes a 400 amino acid protein of molecular weight 44.14 kDa. In silico protein modeling was helpful in predicting the 3D models of the novel chitinase II enzyme, followed by the prediction of its active sites. The presence of Glu176 was found to be essential for the activity of chitinase II. Similarly, analysis of chitinase I revealed several active sites in its structural framework. A 10 ns Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations was implemented to assess the conformational preferences of chitinases. The MD trajectories at different temperatures clearly revealed that the stability of the enzymes were maintained at higher temperatures. Additionally, a constant pH molecular dynamics simulations at a pH range 2-6 was performed to establish the optimum activity and stability profiles of chitinase I and chitinase II. For this purpose, the Molecular Dynamics simulations were carried out at fixed protonation states in an explicit water environment to evaluate the effect of the physiological pH on chitinase I and II enzymes obtained from T. lanuginosus. The results suggest a strong conformational pH dependence of chitinases. These enzymes retained their characteristic TIM Barrel fold at the respective protonated conditions, thus validated the experimental outcomes. Further, the different stability and flexibility predictions were used to assess the relation of point mutations and enzyme stabilities. Our results pave the way to engineer new and better thermostable enzymes.
26

Middle Permian continental biodiversity changes as reflected in the Beaufort Group of South Africa: a bio-and lithostratigraphic review of the Eodicynodon, Tapinocephalus and Pristerognathus assemblage zones

Day, Michael Oliver 4 March 2014 (has links)
The fluvio-lacustrine rocks of the Beaufort Group, South Africa have long been known for their tetrapod fossil record, which is the richest and most complete Middle Permian to Middle Triassic record for any terrestrial sequence in the world. The abundance of fossil material has enabled the Beaufort Group to be biostratigraphically subdivided into between 8 and 10 tetrapod assemblage zones, of which the lowest three (Eodicynodon, Tapinocephalus and Pristerognathus) are attributed to the Middle Permian. These lower assemblage zones record the earliest therapsiddominated faunas and, because they were recorded during a largely uninterrupted period of deposition, make the Beaufort Group the only place in the world where biodiversity change through the terrestrial Middle Permian can be effectively studied. In the last two decades, much interest has focused on an extinction of marine invertebrates at or close to the end of the Middle Permian (Guadalupian epoch), but the existence of a concurrent extinction in the terrestrial realm is contentious. The Beaufort Group is already well known to record the Permo-Triassic Mass Extinction but it also records an earlier extinction at the top of the Tapinocephalus Assemblage Zone (AZ). This extinction is very poorly understood but recent radiometric dates for many Permian assemblage zones of the Beaufort Group have confirmed a Middle Permian age for Eodicynodon, Tapinocephalus and Pristerognathus assemblage zones and suggest that the end-Tapinocephalus AZ extinction may coincide with the marine extinctions. A recently produced GIS database that accommodates all Beaufort Group fossil material curated in South Africa formed the basis on which the stratigraphic range of individual specimens was calculated. To put the fossil localities in a stratigraphic context, lithostratigraphic information was retrieved from the literature and extensive fieldwork was conducted, which measured stratigraphic sections in key areas and traced the surface outcrop of lithostratigraphic units. In order to compensate for lateral variations in lithostratigraphy, the basin was split into sectors, each represented by a stratigraphic section. The stratigraphic ranges of fossil specimens and, subsequently, of genera and families could then be calculated and a workable biostratigraphic subdivision of the Middle Permian Beaufort Group proposed. The Abrahamskraal Formation, which forms the majority of the Middle Permian Beaufort sequence, can be divided into six lithostratigraphic members based on the occurrence of sandstone ‘packages’. These members were traced laterally across the Basin and their correspondence with fining-upwards cycles was refined and correlated with the newly defined biostratigraphic units. This refined two-pronged stratigraphic subdivision allowed the recognition of a waning period of subsidence in the proximal sector of the Karoo Basin during the Middle Permian. Stratigraphic ranges of individual genera were found to be far more heterogeneous than previously recognised. Dicynodont genera are useful biostratigraphic indicators due to their relative abundance and well-defined stratigraphic ranges, while dinocephalians and pareiasaurs are clustered in the upper part of the Abrahamskraal Formation. The stratigraphic range of Eodicynodon extends further up in the Abrahamskraal Formation than was previously recognised. The Tapinocephalus AZ is restricted to approximately the upper fifth of the Abrahamskraal Formation and is characterised by advanced tapinocephalid dinocephalians and the pareiasaur Bradysaurus. Between these two biozones is a stratigraphic interval dubbed the mid- Abrahamskraal Formation Transition Zone, where both Eodicynodon and advanced tapinocephalids coexisted. A 75 % loss of generic diversity occurred between the upper Tapinocephalus AZ and the base of the Pristerognathus AZ, which corresponds to a stratigraphic interval between the mid-Karelskraal Member of the Abrahamskraal Formation and the mid- Poortjie Member of the Teekloof Formation. Several taxa that survive the end- Tapinocephalus AZ extinction, and are relatively common in the overlying Pristerognathus AZ (scylacosaurid therocephalians, the dicynodont genus Eosimops and the parareptile Eunotosaurus), all became extinct in the upper Poortjie Member at a time when generic originations are increasing. This suggests a second wave of extinctions in a similar fashion to that recorded at the Permo-Triassic boundary.
27

Leisure-learning : revitalising the role of museums : a survey of Cape Town parents' attitudes towards museums

Mathers, Kathryn 1993 (has links)
Bibliography: pages 78-84. The aim of this project was to assess the image of museums in Cape Town society in the context of the changing needs of South African people. A questionnaire examining museum-visiting habits and perceptions of the role of museums was distributed to parents via nine schools in Cape Town. Each school represented a different socioeconomic package so that the sample included parents with varying educational status and incomes. Parents of school-going children were sampled because they may be predisposed towards museums as institutions that offer their children educational and recreational opportunities and, therefore, represent a best-case scenario. The majority of the sample had visited a museum. A relationship exists between museum-visiting and higher socioeconomic status. Museum- visiting, though, was not limited to people with a higher level of education. Parents who were actively involved in a broad range of leisure activities were most likely to have visited museums. Although socioeconomic status and participation in leisure activities are related, museum-visitors appear to have leisure-lifestyles and not level of education in common. The results showed a contradiction in parents' attitudes towards museums; the image of museums was good but the image of the museum experience was often bad. This was particularly the case for infrequent museum-visitors. This group also experienced a feeling that 'museums are for a different type of person', which may explain why they do not visit despite believing that museums are worthwhile institutions. Museums appear to be perceived as institutions that offer children opportunities for learning and recreation. This could be the reason why young adults or seniors do not participate in museum programmes. This survey also showed that museums were associated with research on and preservation of the past. Black parents, though, were least likely to make this association and it is possible that the emphasis of most museums on the post-colonial past of South Africa is one reason why Black South Africans do not visit museums. There does, though, exist a generally positive image of the role of museums. The emphasis placed on leisure-learning or semi-leisure by young and old people in the townships does indicate that museums could meet an important need for constructive leisure opportunities.
28

The contribution of agriculture to the economic growth of South Africa

31 August 2011 (has links)
M.Comm. The agricultural sector is important in South Africa, because it contributes approximately 4 percent to the country’s Gross Domestic Product. Agriculture can contribute significantly to economic growth, by means of food production and job creation, and thereby it can play an important role in reducing poverty. This paper examines the contribution of agriculture to economic growth in South Africa, and its possible role in poverty alleviation. It begins by conducting a literature review of the contribution of agriculture to economic growth. In particular, it examines two stages of farming, namely, the subsistence and commercial stages, to determine how each of these contributes to economic growth and poverty alleviation. It finds that both of these stages have undergone little improvement over the years and have performed poorly. Next, the challenges that prevent the farming sector from performing better are described and investigated in detail. Importantly, unavailability of the data in the subsistence sector makes it harder to arrive at a conclusion as to whether agriculture contributes to poverty alleviation. Despite these challenges, the study finds that agriculture remains the key to survival for most of the rural poor. Finally the paper draws conclusions and makes recommendations for policy measures to increase growth in the agricultural sector based on the findings of the research. The key conclusion emanating from this study is that agriculture does not indeed contribute to economic growth and that it is able to alleviate poverty. However, resources such as land, skilled labour, machinery and capitals are a major limiting factor. As for recommendations, a critical strategy must be to recapitalise agriculture, investing more heavily in this sector and in programmes to develop rural economic and social infrastructure. Public investment needs to be directed in particular towards promoting agricultural research and extension, improving access to financial services, providing investment incentives, and increasing access of the poor to support services and productive resources. The study concludes that data and information should be separated between subsistence and commercial farmers to be able to determine whether agriculture contributes to poverty alleviation.
29

The tax treatment of compensation and damages

Cron, Kevin Richard 17 February 2015 (has links)
No description available.
30

Private padvragvervoer in Suid-Afrika

18 February 2014 (has links)
M.Com. (Economics) The objective of this study was to obtain information that will enable the identification of the role, nature and magnitude of private road freight transport in the South African economy. The underlying rationale was the lack of information in this regard in South Africa. Information about private road freight transport was obtained on a sectoral basis by means of a literature analysis and an empirical investigation.

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