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  • About
  • The Global ETD Search service is a free service for researchers to find electronic theses and dissertations. This service is provided by the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations.
    Our metadata is collected from universities around the world. If you manage a university/consortium/country archive and want to be added, details can be found on the NDLTD website.
1

Moral judgment and rated school behaviour

Mahabir, Ronald January 1973 (has links)
No description available.
2

Academics as an antecedent to clinical competence

Morgan, Teresa G. January 1984 (has links)
There is no abstract available for this thesis.
3

Die persoonlikheidsbeeld van die suksesvolle onderwysstudent

Verhoef, Stefina Anna Catharina 24 April 2014 (has links)
M.A. (Psychology) / Please refer to full text to view abstract
4

Moral judgment and rated school behaviour

Mahabir, Ronald January 1973 (has links)
No description available.
5

Judgments of academic achievement by teachers and standardized, norm-referenced tests revisited : an issue of educational and political policy

Peters, Richard G. January 1991 (has links)
The purpose of this study was to investigate the degree of concurrence between teachers' judgments of the academic achievement of students and the results of standardized,norm-referenced achievement tests. Although this issue had been addressed before, results reported in the literature lacked a sensitivity to the informational needs of educational policy makers and were obfuscated by significant differences in research design and analytical techniques. This study attempted to address the potential moderating effect of teachers' pre-established notions of students' knowledge, academic subject area, grade level, and student gender on the agreement level between teachers' judgment of student achievement and test results, while focusing on the ever increasing use of test scores to make decisions regarding student readiness for promotion/graduation and overall school accountability.Approximately 670 teachers were asked to rate their students as "not ready to succeed at the next grade level without remedial assistance" (non-masters) or "ready to succeed without additional instruction or intervention" (masters). Ratings were obtained in both English/language arts and mathematics for 15,935 students in grades 1, 2, 3, 6, and 8. The sample utilized was representative of the demographics of the state of Indiana. While appropriate statistical tests of significance were performed when appropriate, this study focused on effect size as the final determinant of "educational significance."Analyses revealed no practical reason to believe that teachers' judgments were influenced by their initial ratings of students as masters or non-masters, student gender, grade level, or subject matter. On the average, teachers' mastery/non-mastery ratings were found to agree with "cutscores" established through discriminant analysis in about 78% of the cases. These results were seen as encouraging, in that test results could be used to support teacher judgment, which seemed unaffected by moderating variables, while not offering information completely redundant with pre-existing teacher knowledge of student achievement. / Department of Educational Psychology
6

Reporting pupil progress

Unknown Date (has links)
"The writer has come to believe that much of the discussion in faculty meetings on the topic 'How to Improve Evaluation of Pupil Progress' has centered too much on the mechanics of reporting, that is, upon a debate regarding the form and kind of marking system used in the report card itself. Ideas gathered from several courses taken at Florida State University and from reading have convinced the writer that while, in evaluating pupil progress, the method of reporting is important, building a new report card is not the first step to be undertaken. Several prior questions of a very fundamental sort must be answered before one comes to settling the report card issue. Therefore the paper will reflect what the writer considers to be essential considerations in the process of defining learning outcomes, securing evidence of their achievement, and reporting the progress achieved"--Introduction. / Typescript. / "August, 1958." / "Submitted to the Graduate Council of Florida State University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Science." / Advisor: W. Edwards, Professor Directing Paper. / Includes bibliographical references (leaves 46-47).
7

Investigating the impact of student-initiated criteria for English language school-based assessment

Ho, Wai-leung, 何偉良. January 2007 (has links)
published_or_final_version / Education / Master / Master of Education
8

Video portfolios : do they have validity as an assessment tool?

Anderson, Craig Donavin January 2004 (has links)
No description available.
9

A comparative study of the intellectual and educational status of high school graduates selected by the University of Arizona as freshmen in 1927

Hoelzle, Gladys E. January 1928 (has links)
No description available.
10

Video portfolios : do they have validity as an assessment tool? / Validity of portfolios

Anderson, Craig Donavin January 2004 (has links)
This thesis presents a study of the validity of video portfolios as an assessment tool. For this study, first and second grade students were videotaped doing exercises four times in reading and four times in math over the course of a school year. After portfolios were collected, each set of four videos (either math or reading) was shown to teachers in random order. The teachers were asked to put the clips into the correct chronological and, therefore, developmental order. Interviews after the task investigated the criteria teachers used to order the clips, and found that they used task complexity, task performance, and demeanor of students as the primary factors. The teachers were able to correctly order the video clips to a high level of significance. This finding supports the hypothesis that video portfolios have validity as an assessment of progress in student achievement. Interview data also yielded relevant findings for the future use and implementation of video portfolios. Further studies should investigate the generalizability of these results, more closely examine the criteria teachers use to evaluate portfolios, and determine the validity of portfolios as an evaluation for other aspects of student learning.

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