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  • About
  • The Global ETD Search service is a free service for researchers to find electronic theses and dissertations. This service is provided by the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations.
    Our metadata is collected from universities around the world. If you manage a university/consortium/country archive and want to be added, details can be found on the NDLTD website.
1

Actor observer bias : Påverkar könet hur vi attribuerar?

Aronson, Sara January 2014 (has links)
Actor-observer bias är benägenheten för människor att attribuera sitt eget beteende utifrån omständigheter och andras beteende utifrån deras person. Vi tenderar dessutom att favorisera och vara mer förlåtande i attributionerna till de som tillhör vår ingrupp. Studiens syfte var att undersöka huruvida graden av tillhörighet till ingruppen, kön, påverkar hur vi attribuerar. Studien genomfördes med 102 deltagare, 51 kvinnor och 51 män. En konfliktsituation mellan ett par presenterades för deltagarna där den ena parten i förhållandet (X) beter sig illa mot den andra. Enkäten förekom i tre versioner med X som kvinna, man eller deltagaren själv. Det predicerades bl a att deltagare som upplever hög identifiering med sin ingrupp kommer attribuera övervägande externt då X hör till dennes ingrupp. Resultatet visade inget signifikant stöd för denna hypotes. Tendenser för att kvinnans beteende bedömdes hårdare kunde dock urskiljas. Betydelsen av detta, den eventuella inverkan av könsroller samt framtida forskning diskuteras.
2

The Role of Ethnic Compatibility in Attitude Formation: Marketing to America’s Diverse Consumers

Cano, Cynthia Rodriguez 23 March 2007 (has links)
This study investigates the meaning of advertising through the eyes of the Hispanic consumer and how that meaning is apparent in attitudes and purchase intention. Specifically, the study investigates how ethnic minorities judge print advertisement that feature ethnically diverse models as communication cues. For the first time, data of how minorities evaluate the compatibility of models from different ethnic groups featured together in an advertisement was collected. Qualitative data was collected from Hispanics and typologies of cultural pointers for Hispanics and African-Americans developed. Experimental design, 3x2 within-group analysis, was conducted to test the 14 hypothesized relationships. Finding clearly support the notion that perceived ethnic compatibility of models featured in an advertisement influence resulting attitudes (i.e., toward the actors and advertisement). Of crucial importance is the finding that when viewing an advertisement featuring mixed models (i.e., one Hispanic model and one African-American model), both strong and weak Hispanic ethnic identifiers did not exhibit an intention to purchase the advertised product. This finding challenges the value of multicultural advertising, which feature various ethnic models together to reach several groups simultaneously, to effectively connect with ethnic minorities.
3

The own-group bias in face processing: the effect of training on recognition performance

Wittwer, Tania 02 March 2021 (has links)
The own-group bias in face recognition (OGB) is the greater facility to distinguish and recognize people from one's own group at the expense of people from other-groups. The OGB has been studied for many years, however, very little research focuses on finding a way to decrease or eliminate it, through training. Reporting five studies involving memory or matching tasks, the aim of the present thesis was to develop and to explore to what extent training can decrease or remove the OGB. French White participants, and South African White, Black and Coloured participants took part in different studies, using Black and White faces as stimuli. In each study, White participants from both countries presented the expected OGB prior to any intervention. However, the presence of the OGB in South African Black participants was detected only in one (matching task) study, instead recording a higher discrimination performance by Black participants for White faces in the other studies. As expected, South African Coloured participants did not display increased discrimination performance for any of the other stimuli groups, both being out-group stimuli. Results from the training studies revealed either (a) no effect of a distributed training in feature focus over 5 weeks; (b) an increase of the OGB after a focus on critical facial features; (c) a decrease of the OGB in a task-specific training using pictures whose quality had been manipulated, and; (d) an important implication of the presence/absence of the target in a field detection study. With some promising results, the present work contributes to our understanding of how training could be used to improve face-recognition, and especially other-group face recognition.
4

The effects of sports team allegiance on jurors' perceptions of a defendant

Ranieri, Andrea 01 May 2012 (has links)
This study examined the relationship between levels of sports team identification and sentence leniency. It was hypothesized that sharing the same sports team affiliation with the defendant would create bias in the form of juror leniency, and that highly identified fans would show more bias than lower identified fans. A case description of a hit and run accident, in which the defendant was described as a Tampa Bay Buccaneers fan, was read by 220 participants. Results showed a significant difference in recommended sentence length and levels of sympathy between the three groups (High Identity, Low Identity, & No Identity). However, contrary to the original hypothesis, participants who were highly identified with the Tampa Bay Buccaneers recommended a significantly longer sentence for the defendant and were less sympathetic than participants who had lower identification to the Buccaneers and those who had no Buccaneer identification. This paper discusses the relation of this finding with the Reverse Attractive Leniency Effect, as well as the Same-Sex Penalty Effect.
5

Dissociating Self-Similarity and Self-Relevance in the Own-Group Bias

Deska, Jason C. 23 April 2015 (has links)
No description available.
6

Social interaktion i den minimala gruppsituationen leder inte till mer särbehandling

Wiklund, Sofia, Olin, Cecilia January 2017 (has links)
Individer har en systematisk tendens att favorisera medlemmar i ens egen grupp och diskriminera de som tillhör en annan grupp, trots minimala grunder för gruppindelning. Denna studie syftar till att undersöka om social interaktion mellan individer i grupper påverkar denna särbehandlingstendens. I sådana fall, kan detta komma att yttra sig genom bland annat skillnader i kunskapsutbyte och spridning av information mellan de anställda på en arbetsplats. Grupper delades in slumpmässigt och särbehandlingen mättes via poängfördelning. Datainsamlingen skedde via både experiment (n = 41) och enkät (n = 135) samt med tre olika nivåer av social interaktion. Undersökningsdeltagarna fördelade mer poäng till sin egen grupp, än till den andra gruppen. Däremot påverkade varken grad av social interaktion eller typ av metod poängfördelningen. Vid samtliga tillfällen var det mellan en tredjedel till strax över hälften av undersökningsdeltagarna som särbehandlade. Slutsatsen är att även vid en slumpmässig gruppindelning så kommer en särbehandlingstendens att ske.
7

The role of gender in face recognition

Rehnman, Jenny January 2007 (has links)
Faces constitute one of the most important stimuli for humans. Studies show that women recognize more faces than men, and that females are particularly able to recognize female faces, thus exhibiting an own-sex bias. In the present thesis, three empirical studies investigated the generality of sex differences in face recognition and the female own-sex bias. Study I explored men’s and women’s face recognition performance for Bangladeshi and Swedish female and male faces of adults and children. Result showed sex differences, favoring women, for all face categories. Study II assessed boys’ and girls’ ability to recognize female and male faces from two age- and ethnic groups. The result demonstrated that girls recognize more faces than boys do, but that no sex differences were present for Swedish male faces. The results from Study I and II consistently demonstrate that females show reliable own-sex biases independent of whether the female faces were young, old, or of Bangladeshi or Swedish origin. In an attempt to explain the mechanisms of sex differences in face recognition and the female own-sex bias, Study III investigated men’s and women’s recognition performance for androgynous faces, either labeled “men”, “women”, or “faces”. The result showed that women told to remember “women” recognized more faces than women told to remember faces labeled “men” or “faces”, and that sex differences were present for androgynous faces, regardless of the label. Based on these findings, it is suggested that females’ attention is in particular directed towards other females, resulting in an own-sex bias. It is also suggested that there may be a difference in females’ and males’ orientation toward other individuals. This difference can have a biological base, which together with socialization may result in sex differences in face recognition.
8

Adjusting for Bounding and Time-in-Sample Eects in the National Crime Victimization Survey (NCVS) Property Crime Rate Estimation

Yang, Hui 08 June 2016 (has links)
No description available.
9

The Role of Social Categorization in the Own Group Bias

Wilson, John Paul 28 July 2013 (has links)
No description available.
10

The role of gender in face recognition

Rehnman, Jenny January 2007 (has links)
<p>Faces constitute one of the most important stimuli for humans. Studies show that women recognize more faces than men, and that females are particularly able to recognize female faces, thus exhibiting an own-sex bias. In the present thesis, three empirical studies investigated the generality of sex differences in face recognition and the female own-sex bias. <i>Study I</i> explored men’s and women’s face recognition performance for Bangladeshi and Swedish female and male faces of adults and children. Result showed sex differences, favoring women, for all face categories. <i>Study II </i>assessed boys’ and girls’ ability to recognize female and male faces from two age- and ethnic groups. The result demonstrated that girls recognize more faces than boys do, but that no sex differences were present for Swedish male faces. The results from <i>Study I</i> and <i>II</i> consistently demonstrate that females show reliable own-sex biases independent of whether the female faces were young, old, or of Bangladeshi or Swedish origin. In an attempt to explain the mechanisms of sex differences in face recognition and the female own-sex bias, <i>Study III</i> investigated men’s and women’s recognition performance for androgynous faces, either labeled “men”, “women”, or “faces”. The result showed that women told to remember “women” recognized more faces than women told to remember faces labeled “men” or “faces”, and that sex differences were present for androgynous faces, regardless of the label. Based on these findings, it is suggested that females’ attention is in particular directed towards other females, resulting in an own-sex bias. It is also suggested that there may be a difference in females’ and males’ orientation toward other individuals. This difference can have a biological base, which together with socialization may result in sex differences in face recognition. </p>

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