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  • About
  • The Global ETD Search service is a free service for researchers to find electronic theses and dissertations. This service is provided by the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations.
    Our metadata is collected from universities around the world. If you manage a university/consortium/country archive and want to be added, details can be found on the NDLTD website.
1

Analysis and Suppression of Power Supply Noise for Airborne Telemetering Transmitter

Wu, Qing, Yang, Lu-yu 10 1900 (has links)
ITC/USA 2009 Conference Proceedings / The Forty-Fifth Annual International Telemetering Conference and Technical Exhibition / October 26-29, 2009 / Riviera Hotel & Convention Center, Las Vegas, Nevada / During the program researching on airborne telemetering transmitter of a certain remote telemetry system, small size and a variety of voltage on board are design difficulties. Due to the above important factors, the performance of power supply makes a big affect to the parameters of BPSK modulated signal, especially the EVM (Error Vector Magnitude). The author analyzes the cause of power supply noise and puts forward some suggestions to damp the noise. With these methods, the EVM of modulated signal is improved. Finally, we can conclude the related principles about the suppression of power supply noise.
2

Statistical static timing analysis considering the impact of power supply noise in VLSI circuits

Kim, Hyun Sung 02 June 2009 (has links)
As semiconductor technology is scaled and voltage level is reduced, the impact of the variation in power supply has become very significant in predicting the realistic worst-case delays in integrated circuits. The analysis of power supply noise is inevitable because high correlations exist between supply voltage and delay. Supply noise analysis has often used a vector-based timing analysis approach. Finding a set of test vectors in vector-based approaches, however, is very expensive, particularly during the design phase, and becomes intractable for larger circuits in DSM technology. In this work, two novel vectorless approaches are described such that increases in circuit delay, because of power supply noise, can be efficiently, quickly estimated. Experimental results on ISCAS89 circuits reveal the accuracy and efficiency of my approaches: in s38417 benchmark circuits, errors on circuit delay distributions are less than 2%, and both of my approaches are 67 times faster than the traditional vector-based approach. Also, the results show the importance of considering care-bits, which sensitize the longest paths during the power supply noise analysis.
3

Power supply noise in delay testing

Wang, Jing 15 May 2009 (has links)
As technology scales into the Deep Sub-Micron (DSM) regime, circuit designs have become more and more sensitive to power supply noise. Excessive noise can significantly affect the timing performance of DSM designs and cause non-trivial additional delay. In delay test generation, test compaction and test fill techniques can produce excessive power supply noise. This will eventually result in delay test overkill. To reduce this overkill, we propose a low-cost pattern-dependent approach to analyze noise-induced delay variation for each delay test pattern applied to the design. Two noise models have been proposed to address array bond and wire bond power supply networks, and they are experimentally validated and compared. Delay model is then applied to calculate path delay under noise. This analysis approach can be integrated into static test compaction or test fill tools to control supply noise level of delay tests. We also propose an algorithm to predict transition count of a circuit, which can be applied to control switching activity during dynamic compaction. Experiments have been performed on ISCAS89 benchmark circuits. Results show that compacted delay test patterns generated by our compaction tool can meet a moderate noise or delay constraint with only a small increase in compacted test set size. Take the benchmark circuit s38417 for example: a 10% delay increase constraint only results in 1.6% increase in compacted test set size in our experiments. In addition, different test fill techniques have a significant impact on path delay. In our work, a test fill tool with supply noise analysis has been developed to compare several test fill techniques, and results show that the test fill strategy significant affect switching activity, power supply noise and delay. For instance, patterns with minimum transition fill produce less noise-induced delay than random fill. Silicon results also show that test patterns filled in different ways can cause as much as 14% delay variation on target paths. In conclusion, we must take noise into consideration when delay test patterns are generated.
4

Low Cost Power and Supply Noise Estimation and Control in Scan Testing of VLSI Circuits

Jiang, Zhongwei 2010 December 1900 (has links)
Test power is an important issue in deep submicron semiconductor testing. Too much power supply noise and too much power dissipation can result in excessive temperature rise, both leading to overkill during delay test. Scan-based test has been widely adopted as one of the most commonly used VLSI testing method. The test power during scan testing comprises shift power and capture power. The power consumed in the shift cycle dominates the total power dissipation. It is crucial for IC manufacturing companies to achieve near constant power consumption for a given timing window in order to keep the chip under test (CUT) at a near constant temperature, to make it easy to characterize the circuit behavior and prevent delay test over kill. To achieve constant test power, first, we built a fast and accurate power model, which can estimate the shift power without logic simulation of the circuit. We also proposed an efficient and low power X-bit Filling process, which could potentially reduce both the shift power and capture power. Then, we introduced an efficient test pattern reordering algorithm, which achieves near constant power between groups of patterns. The number of patterns in a group is determined by the thermal constant of the chip. Experimental results show that our proposed power model has very good correlation. Our proposed X-Fill process achieved both minimum shift power and capture power. The algorithm supports multiple scan chains and can achieve constant power within different regions of the chip. The greedy test pattern reordering algorithm can reduce the power variation from 29-126 percent to 8-10 percent or even lower if we reduce the power variance threshold. Excessive noise can significantly affect the timing performance of Deep Sub-Micron (DSM) designs and cause non-trivial additional delay. In delay test generation, test compaction and test fill techniques can produce excessive power supply noise. This can result in delay test overkill. Prior approaches to power supply noise aware delay test compaction are too costly due to many logic simulations, and are limited to static compaction. We proposed a realistic low cost delay test compaction flow that guardbands the delay using a sequence of estimation metrics to keep the circuit under test supply noise more like functional mode. This flow has been implemented in both static compaction and dynamic compaction. We analyzed the relationship between delay and voltage drop, and the relationship between effective weighted switching activity (WSA) and voltage drop. Based on these correlations, we introduce the low cost delay test pattern compaction framework considering power supply noise. Experimental results on ISCAS89 circuits show that our low cost framework is up to ten times faster than the prior high cost framework. Simulation results also verify that the low cost model can correctly guardband every path‟s extra noise-induced delay. We discussed the rules to set different constraints in the levelized framework. The veto process used in the compaction can be also applied to other constraints, such as power and temperature.
5

On-Chip Power Supply Noise: Scaling, Suppression and Detection

Karim, Tasreen January 2012 (has links)
Design metrics such as area, timing and power are generally considered as the primary criteria in the design of modern day circuits, however, the minimization of power supply noise, among other noise sources, is appreciably more important since not only can it cause a degradation in these parameters but can cause entire chips to fail. Ensuring the integrity of the power supply voltage in the power distribution network of a chip is therefore crucial to both building reliable circuits as well as preventing circuit performance degradation. Power supply noise concerns, predicted over two decades ago, continue to draw significant attention, and with present CMOS technology projected to keep on scaling, it is shown in this work that these issues are not expected to diminish. This research also considers the management and on-chip detection of power supply noise. There are various methods of managing power supply noise, with the use of decoupling capacitors being the most common technique for suppressing the noise. An in-depth analysis of decap structures including scaling effects is presented in this work with corroborating silicon results. The applicability of various decaps for given design constraints is provided. It is shown that MOS-metal hybrid structures can provide a significant increase in capacitance per unit area compared to traditional structures and will continue to be an important structure as technology continues to scale. Noise suppression by means of current shifting within the clock period of an ALU block is further shown to be an additional method of reducing the minimum voltage observed on its associated supply. A simple, and area and power efficient technique for on-chip supply noise detection is also proposed.
6

On-Chip Power Supply Noise: Scaling, Suppression and Detection

Karim, Tasreen January 2012 (has links)
Design metrics such as area, timing and power are generally considered as the primary criteria in the design of modern day circuits, however, the minimization of power supply noise, among other noise sources, is appreciably more important since not only can it cause a degradation in these parameters but can cause entire chips to fail. Ensuring the integrity of the power supply voltage in the power distribution network of a chip is therefore crucial to both building reliable circuits as well as preventing circuit performance degradation. Power supply noise concerns, predicted over two decades ago, continue to draw significant attention, and with present CMOS technology projected to keep on scaling, it is shown in this work that these issues are not expected to diminish. This research also considers the management and on-chip detection of power supply noise. There are various methods of managing power supply noise, with the use of decoupling capacitors being the most common technique for suppressing the noise. An in-depth analysis of decap structures including scaling effects is presented in this work with corroborating silicon results. The applicability of various decaps for given design constraints is provided. It is shown that MOS-metal hybrid structures can provide a significant increase in capacitance per unit area compared to traditional structures and will continue to be an important structure as technology continues to scale. Noise suppression by means of current shifting within the clock period of an ALU block is further shown to be an additional method of reducing the minimum voltage observed on its associated supply. A simple, and area and power efficient technique for on-chip supply noise detection is also proposed.
7

Power supply noise reduction in 90 nm using active decap

Thirumalai, Rooban Venkatesh K G 02 May 2009 (has links)
On-chip supply voltage fluctuations are known to adversely affect performance parameters of VLSI circuits. These power supply fluctuations reduce drive capability, causes reliability issues, decrease noise margin and also adversely affect timing. Technology scaling further aggravates the problem as IR and Ldi/dt noise sources increase with each device generation. Current method used to reduce power supply variations uses an on-chip decoupling capacitors (decaps). These MOS capacitors utilize significant die area with about 15%-20% common for high-end microprocessors [4]. They also consume a considerable amount of power due to leakage and are prone to oxide breakdown during an ESD event because of reduced oxide thickness, making MOS capacitors unsuitable for technologies 90 nm and below. To improve the effectiveness of decap and reduce decap’s area, a new active decap design is proposed for 90 nm technology.
8

Power distribution network modeling and microfluidic cooling for high-performance computing systems

Zheng, Li 07 January 2016 (has links)
A silicon interposer platform with microfluidic cooling is proposed for high-performance computing systems. The key components and technologies for the proposed platform, including electrical and fluidic microbumps, microfluidic vias and heat sinks, and simultaneous flip-chip bonding of the electrical and fluidic microbumps, are developed and demonstrated. Fine-pitch electrical microbumps of 25 µm diameter and 50 µm pitch, fluidic vias of 100 µm diameter, and annular-shaped fluidic microbumps of 150 µm inner diameter and 210 µm outer diameter were fabricated and bonded. Electrical and fluidic tests were conducted to verify the bonding results. Moreover, the thermal and signaling benefits of the proposed platform were evaluated based on thermal measurements and simulations, and signaling simulations. Compared to the conventional air cooling, significant reductions in system temperature and thermal coupling are achieved with the proposed platform. Moreover, the signaling performance is improved due to the reduced temperature, especially for long interconnects on the silicon interposer. A numerical power distribution network (PDN) simulator is developed based on distributed circuit models for on-die power/ground grids, package- and board- level power/ground planes, and the finite difference method. The simulator enables power supply noise simulation, including IR-drop and simultaneous switching noise, for a full chip with multiple blocks of different power, decoupling capacitor, and power/ground pad densities. The distributed circuit model is further extended to include TSVs to enable simulations for 3D PDN. The integration of package- and board- level power/ground planes enables co-simulation of die-package-board PDN and exploration of new PDN configurations.
9

Toward Reliable, Secure, and Energy-Efficient Multi-Core System Design

Basu, Prabal 01 August 2019 (has links)
Computer hardware researchers have perennially focussed on improving the performance of computers while stipulating the energy consumption under a strict budget. While several innovations over the years have led to high performance and energy efficient computers, more challenges have also emerged as a fallout. For example, smaller transistor devices in modern multi-core systems are afflicted with several reliability and security concerns, which were inconceivable even a decade ago. Tackling these bottlenecks happens to negatively impact the power and performance of the computers. This dissertation explores novel techniques to gracefully solve some of the pressing challenges of the modern computer design. Specifically, the proposed techniques improve the reliability of on-chip communication fabric under a high power supply noise, increase the energy-efficiency of low-power graphics processing units, and demonstrate an unprecedented security loophole of the low-power computing paradigm through rigorous hardware-based experiments.
10

Pseudofunctional Delay Tests For High Quality Small Delay Defect Testing

Lahiri, Shayak 2011 December 1900 (has links)
Testing integrated circuits to verify their operating frequency, known as delay testing, is essential to achieve acceptable product quality. The high cost of functional testing has driven the industry to automatically-generated structural tests, applied by low-cost testers taking advantage of design-for-test (DFT) circuitry on the chip. Traditional at-speed functional testing of digital circuits is increasingly challenged by new defect types and the high cost of functional test development. This research addressed the problems of accurate delay testing in DSM circuits by targeting resistive open and short circuits, while taking into account manufacturing process variation, power dissipation and power supply noise. In this work, we developed a class of structural delay tests in which we extended traditional launch-on-capture delay testing to additional launch and capture cycles. We call these Pseudofunctional Tests (PFT). A test pattern is scanned into the circuit, and then multiple functional clock cycles are applied to it with at-speed launch and capture for the last two cycles. The circuit switching activity over an extended period allows the off-chip power supply noise transient to die down prior to the at-speed launch and capture, achieving better timing correlation with the functional mode of operation. In addition, we also proposed advanced compaction methodologies to compact the generated test patterns into a smaller test set in order to reduce the test application time. We modified our CodGen K longest paths per gate automatic test pattern generator to implement PFT pattern generation. Experimental results show that PFT test generation is practical in terms of test generation time.

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