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  • About
  • The Global ETD Search service is a free service for researchers to find electronic theses and dissertations. This service is provided by the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations.
    Our metadata is collected from universities around the world. If you manage a university/consortium/country archive and want to be added, details can be found on the NDLTD website.
1

Translating Belief : A translation study of a theological text, focusing on terminology and on words and phrases derived from the Bible

Svanström Salander, Christin January 2012 (has links)
No description available.
2

From Bible to Babel Fish: The Evolution of Translation and Translation Theory

Settle, Lori Louise 20 May 2004 (has links)
Translation, the transfer of the written word from one language to another, has a long history, and many important scholars have helped shape its perceptions, accepted processes, and theories. Machine translation, translation by computer software requiring little or no human input, is the latest movement in the translation field, a possible way for the profession to keep abreast of the enormous demand for scientific, business, and technical translations. This study examines MT by placing it in a historical context â first exploring the history of translation and translation theory, then following that explanation with one of machine translation, its problems, and its potential. / Master of Arts
3

An Active Approach to Translation: Connexions between Translation and Freudian Psychoanalysis

Caballero Rodriguez, B. January 2002 (has links)
This work focuses on Translation as a process as experienced by the translator. It uses a psychoanalysis as a framework to examine the different aspects and stages of this process and ultimately establishes a comparison between the cathartic process of undergoing psychoanalysis with the personal changes the translator may undergo as a result of the process of translation s/he engages with.
4

A cognitive approach to figurative language : Translating conceptual metaphors and hyperboles

Friström Bala, Paula January 2015 (has links)
The present study combines quantitative and qualitative methods to investigate translation strategies applied in a translation of a few chapters in Cat Counsellor, which is a book about cat behaviour. A cognitive approach and translation strategies are the focus of this essay, which arrives at the conclusion that figurative language in general, and conceptual metaphors and hyperboles in particular, are used to manipulate, or rather convince readers of Cat Counsellor of a certain outlook. The translation strategies investigated in this essay are literal translation, transference translation and meaning translation. Of these translation strategies literal translation was applied 70% of the time, which indicates that similar cultures use similar figurative language. It also indicates that the target text and language often benefit from new figurative language rendered in the source language and source text. An important conclusion is that metaphorical language, such as conceptual metaphors and hyperboles may seem easy to translate, while in fact concepts can vary across cultures, which indicate that the translator carefully has to consider his or her translation choices in order to produce an accurate translation.
5

Cicero as translator of Greek in his presentation of the Stoic theory of action

Kruck, James 18 January 2009 (has links)
This thesis involves the study of Cicero’s translation of several Greek terms and concepts. In this analysis I examine some of the historical relations between Greek and Roman cultures in order to establish some of the factors that Cicero encountered when attempting to use Greek terms. This includes, in specific, an examination of Cato the Elder as an example of an elite Roman. The latter half of the thesis focuses on a series of specific Greek terms that deal with the Stoic theory of action. This section illustrates how Cicero introduced the Greek term, how he attempted to translate it into Latin, and any problems that occurred in the translation. Finally, I offer some explanations for any differences that I detected between the Greek Stoic meaning of the term and Cicero’s own translation.
6

Opportunities of Contact: Derrida and Deleuze/Guattari on Translation

Polley, Joanna Louise 17 July 2009 (has links)
This work engages with three contemporary thinkers who offer directions for a philosophy of translation. The initial thesis is that translation is a privileged mode of examining difference in language, because it indicates both the necessity to bring what is irreducibly other or foreign into terms of familiarity, and the extreme difficulties, perhaps the impossibility, of such an enterprise. I examine the particular responses to this translation dilemma given by Jacques Derrida and Gilles Deleuze/Félix Guattari, ultimately arguing that although Derrida gives crucial insights into the problem itself, a future theory of translation would need to go beyond Derrida’s approach and adopt the radically pragmatic approach to language articulated by Deleuze and Guattari. Throughout, I examine this problem in terms of the distinction between Derrida as a philosopher of transcendence and Deleuze and Guattari as philosophers of immanence. Derrida’s work insists on the impossibility of representing the other in language, and his simultaneous necessity and impossibility of translation is valuable insofar as it offers resistances to the presumptions of translation as standing in for the other. I argue, however, that Derrida’s insistence on impossibility as marked in the performativity of language itself is ultimately unable to give us a satisfying account of the relation between language and the world, which leaves us with no direction for how we might engage with concrete problems in actual translation situations in a productive way. The central problem with Derrida’s view is his insistence on the model of inter-lingual translation as figuring the paradox of difference in language. The approach of Deleuze and Guattari reverses this order and re-conceives of translation in a pragmatic context, where inter-semiotic translations are uniquely able to release the creative power of language. Through their articulation of the expressivity of matter, Deleuze and Guattari place language in a wider context in which it is intricately engaged in a world. I place translation in this wider context in order to demonstrate how Deleuze and Guattari’s thinking about language allows us to re-conceive of translation practices as opportunities for transformations of both language and world.
7

Cicero as translator of Greek in his presentation of the Stoic theory of action

Kruck, James 18 January 2009 (has links)
This thesis involves the study of Cicero’s translation of several Greek terms and concepts. In this analysis I examine some of the historical relations between Greek and Roman cultures in order to establish some of the factors that Cicero encountered when attempting to use Greek terms. This includes, in specific, an examination of Cato the Elder as an example of an elite Roman. The latter half of the thesis focuses on a series of specific Greek terms that deal with the Stoic theory of action. This section illustrates how Cicero introduced the Greek term, how he attempted to translate it into Latin, and any problems that occurred in the translation. Finally, I offer some explanations for any differences that I detected between the Greek Stoic meaning of the term and Cicero’s own translation. / February 2009
8

Opportunities of Contact: Derrida and Deleuze/Guattari on Translation

Polley, Joanna Louise 17 July 2009 (has links)
This work engages with three contemporary thinkers who offer directions for a philosophy of translation. The initial thesis is that translation is a privileged mode of examining difference in language, because it indicates both the necessity to bring what is irreducibly other or foreign into terms of familiarity, and the extreme difficulties, perhaps the impossibility, of such an enterprise. I examine the particular responses to this translation dilemma given by Jacques Derrida and Gilles Deleuze/Félix Guattari, ultimately arguing that although Derrida gives crucial insights into the problem itself, a future theory of translation would need to go beyond Derrida’s approach and adopt the radically pragmatic approach to language articulated by Deleuze and Guattari. Throughout, I examine this problem in terms of the distinction between Derrida as a philosopher of transcendence and Deleuze and Guattari as philosophers of immanence. Derrida’s work insists on the impossibility of representing the other in language, and his simultaneous necessity and impossibility of translation is valuable insofar as it offers resistances to the presumptions of translation as standing in for the other. I argue, however, that Derrida’s insistence on impossibility as marked in the performativity of language itself is ultimately unable to give us a satisfying account of the relation between language and the world, which leaves us with no direction for how we might engage with concrete problems in actual translation situations in a productive way. The central problem with Derrida’s view is his insistence on the model of inter-lingual translation as figuring the paradox of difference in language. The approach of Deleuze and Guattari reverses this order and re-conceives of translation in a pragmatic context, where inter-semiotic translations are uniquely able to release the creative power of language. Through their articulation of the expressivity of matter, Deleuze and Guattari place language in a wider context in which it is intricately engaged in a world. I place translation in this wider context in order to demonstrate how Deleuze and Guattari’s thinking about language allows us to re-conceive of translation practices as opportunities for transformations of both language and world.
9

The Heart of Language : Translating Metaphors in an Informative text

Pettersson, Fredrik January 2011 (has links)
This paper is an analysis of the translation of metaphors in an English informative text and its Swedish translation. The English source text is entitled The Madonna of Stalingrad: Mastering the (Christmas) Past and West German National Identity after World War Two,and the Swedish target text is entitled Madonnan från Stalingrad: att behärska det (nazistiska) förflutna och västtysk identitet efter andra världskriget.The aim of this essay is to investigate how metaphors in an English informative text can be translated to Swedish. The analysis is based on translation strategies suggested by Vinay and Darbelnet (1995), and Newmark (1988). The understanding of metaphors is based on theories by a number of scholars, such as Lakoff and Johnson (1980), and Knowles and Moon (2006). In this paper, metaphors are divided into two groups, referred to as “literal metaphors” and “aesthetic metaphors”. The point is to convey that metaphors are not always “poetic” but actually very common in everyday language; we usually do not reflect upon the fact that we use metaphors all the time. The result of the analysis shows that English and Swedish metaphors are often based on the same images, which indicates that English and Swedish Language cultures are similar. The analysis also shows that even though literal translation of English metaphors often is possible, in many cases transposition or especially modulation is required to make the metaphor idiomatic in Swedish. In most cases, the need for another solution than literaltranslation seems to be linked to context.
10

Problems of translating satire from english to telugu and vice versa: An evaluation

Rao, Durga Srinivasa T 01 1900 (has links)
Problems of translating satire from english to telugu and vice versa

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