• Refine Query
  • Source
  • Publication year
  • to
  • Language
  • 4
  • 1
  • Tagged with
  • 9
  • 9
  • 9
  • 9
  • 5
  • 5
  • 4
  • 4
  • 4
  • 3
  • 3
  • 3
  • 2
  • 2
  • 2
  • About
  • The Global ETD Search service is a free service for researchers to find electronic theses and dissertations. This service is provided by the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations.
    Our metadata is collected from universities around the world. If you manage a university/consortium/country archive and want to be added, details can be found on the NDLTD website.
1

The Effect of Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungal Diversity on Plant Pathogen Defense

Lewandowski, Thaddeus J. 03 October 2012 (has links)
Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) are widespread soil dwelling microorganisms that associate with plant hosts. AMF receive carbon from the host as a result of the mutualism, while the plant’s ability to acquire nutrients is enhanced by AMF. Additionally, AMF benefit their host in the form of pathogen protection. While it is known that increased AMF species richness positively correlates with aboveground plant productivity, the relationship between AMF diversity and pathogen protection is not well understood. In a growth chamber study, the plant host Leucanthemum vulgare, a non-native plant species in North America, was introduced to all combinations of three AMF species either in the presence or absence of the plant root pathogen Rhizoctonia solani. In the presence of the pathogen, the plant host increased its dependence on the AMF symbiosis. However, the richest AMF species assemblage did not provide the greatest pathogen protection. Understanding how diverse groups of AMF protect plants from pathogen attack provides insight into how plant communities are formed and structured. / NSERC
2

The role of indigenously-associated abuscular mycorrhizal fungi as biofertilisers and biological disease-control agents in subsistence cultivation of morogo / Mohlapa Junior Sekoele

Sekoele, Mohlapa Junior January 2006 (has links)
The study examined interactions between morogo plants, arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) and Fusarium species. Morogo refers to traditional leafy vegetables that, together with maize porridge, are dominant staple foods in rural areas of the Limpopo Province such as the Dikgale Demographic Surveillance Site (DDSS). Morogo plants grow either as weeds (often among maize), occur naturally in the field or are cultivated as subsistence crops by rural communities. Botanical species of morogo plants consumed in the DDSS were determined. Colonisation of morogo plant roots by AMF and Fusarium species composition in the immediate soil environment were investigated in four of eight DDSS subsistence communities, Isolated AMF were shown to belong to the genera Acaulospora and Glomus. Twelve Fusarium species were isolated from soil among which Fusariurn verticilliodes and Fusarium proliferaturn occurred predominantly. Greenhouse pot trials were conducted to examine the effect of AMF on morogo plant growth (cowpea; Mgna unguiculata) and Fusarium proliferatum levels in soil, Interaction between plants and AMF, as well as tripartite interactions of cowpea plants, AMF and Fusarium proliferatum were investigated. Non-inoculated cowpea plants served as controls for the following inoculations of cowpea in pots: (i) Fusarium proliferatum; (ii) commercial AMF from Mycoroot (PTY) Ltd. (a mixture of selected indigenous Glomus spp referred to commercial AMF for the purpose of this study); (iii) indigenous AMF obtained from DDSS soil (referred to iocal AMF for the purpose of this study); (iv) commercial AMF plus Fusarium proliferatum; (v) local AMF plus Fusariurn proliferatum. Results showed reduced root colonization by local as well as commercial AMF when Fusarium proliferatum were present. Local AMF significantly enhanced cowpea growth while commercial AMF apparently reduced the level of Fusarium proliferatum in the rhizosphere and surrounding soil. Results suggest that AMF may have potential as biological growth enhancers and bioprotective agents against Fusarium proliferatum. / Thesis (M. Environmental Science (Water Science))--North-West University, Potchefstroom Campus, 2007.
3

The role of indigenously-associated abuscular mycorrhizal fungi as biofertilisers and biological disease-control agents in subsistence cultivation of morogo / Mohlapa Junior Sekoele

Sekoele, Mohlapa Junior January 2006 (has links)
The study examined interactions between morogo plants, arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) and Fusarium species. Morogo refers to traditional leafy vegetables that, together with maize porridge, are dominant staple foods in rural areas of the Limpopo Province such as the Dikgale Demographic Surveillance Site (DDSS). Morogo plants grow either as weeds (often among maize), occur naturally in the field or are cultivated as subsistence crops by rural communities. Botanical species of morogo plants consumed in the DDSS were determined. Colonisation of morogo plant roots by AMF and Fusarium species composition in the immediate soil environment were investigated in four of eight DDSS subsistence communities, Isolated AMF were shown to belong to the genera Acaulospora and Glomus. Twelve Fusarium species were isolated from soil among which Fusariurn verticilliodes and Fusarium proliferaturn occurred predominantly. Greenhouse pot trials were conducted to examine the effect of AMF on morogo plant growth (cowpea; Mgna unguiculata) and Fusarium proliferatum levels in soil, Interaction between plants and AMF, as well as tripartite interactions of cowpea plants, AMF and Fusarium proliferatum were investigated. Non-inoculated cowpea plants served as controls for the following inoculations of cowpea in pots: (i) Fusarium proliferatum; (ii) commercial AMF from Mycoroot (PTY) Ltd. (a mixture of selected indigenous Glomus spp referred to commercial AMF for the purpose of this study); (iii) indigenous AMF obtained from DDSS soil (referred to iocal AMF for the purpose of this study); (iv) commercial AMF plus Fusarium proliferatum; (v) local AMF plus Fusariurn proliferatum. Results showed reduced root colonization by local as well as commercial AMF when Fusarium proliferatum were present. Local AMF significantly enhanced cowpea growth while commercial AMF apparently reduced the level of Fusarium proliferatum in the rhizosphere and surrounding soil. Results suggest that AMF may have potential as biological growth enhancers and bioprotective agents against Fusarium proliferatum. / Thesis (M. Environmental Science (Water Science))--North-West University, Potchefstroom Campus, 2007.
4

Impact des changements globaux sur la diversité des champignons du sol : approche en génomique environnementale / Impact of global changes on soil fungal diversity : an environmental genomics study / Impatto dei cambiamenti globali sulla diversità fungina del suolo : uno studio di genomica ambientale

Bragalini, Claudia 01 April 2015 (has links)
La thèse porte sur l'impact de changements globaux sur la diversité taxonomique et fonctionnelle des champignons du sol. L'impact de l'intensification agricole sur les champignons mycorhiziens à arbuscules a été évalué par comparaison des communautés fongiques présentes sur des sites Européens soumis à différents niveaux d'intensification dans l'usage des terres. La diversité taxonomique a été appréciée par « métabarcoding » sur l'ADN de sol. L'effet de l'intensification apparait lié au contexte local. L'adaptation aux conditions environnementales locales ainsi que des processus stochastiques semblent jouer un rôle important dans le modelage des communautés fongiques. L'effet des changements climatiques en zone Méditerranéenne a été évalué sur les sols d'un site expérimental où une réduction de la pluviométrie a été établie. Nous avons réalisé une approche de séquençage haut débit de 4 familles géniques, 3 d'entre elles codant des enzymes actives sur la biomasse végétale. La date d'échantillonnage, et non la réduction de pluviométrie, a un fort impact sur la diversité béta. Nous formulons l'hypothèse que les communautés fongiques présentes sur des sites soumis à de fortes et récurrentes variations climatiques ont développé des stratégies adaptatives leur conférant une résistance à des variations d'une plus forte intensité. Enfin, une technique indépendante de la PCR (« solution hybrid selection capture ») a été adaptée pour étudier la diversité fonctionnelle des communautés eucaryotes à partir d'ARN de sol. Cette approche, testée sur une famille génique codant des endoxylamases a permis l'isolement d'ADNc complets produisant des enzymes fonctionnelles dans la levure / In this thesis we assessed the impact of two drivers of global change on the taxonomic and functional diversity of soil fungi. The impact of changes in land use on symbiotic Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungi (AMF) was evaluated comparing AMF communities from European sites with different levels of land use intensification. AMF taxonomic diversity was assessed by metabarcoding using soil-extracted DNA. The effect of land use intensification was found to be context-dependent. Adaptation to local environmental conditions and stochastic processes may play important roles in shaping these communities. The effect of climate change in the Mediterranean area was assessed in soils collected from an experimental forest where a rainfall reduction experiment had been established. A parallel high-throughput metabarcoding on soil-extracted RNA was performed on four transcribed fungal genes, 3 of them encodind enzymes involved in plant biomass degradation. Analyses indicated that sampling time had a strong impact on beta-diversity indices, while rainfall reduction had not. We hypothesized that microbial communities present in environments which naturally experience strong and recurrent climatic variations have developed adaptive strategies to cope with these variations and may be to some extent resistant to further climate changes. Finally, an original PCR-independent technique (“solution hybrid selection capture”) was adapted to study the functional diversity of eukaryotic microbial communities using soil RNA. The approach, tested on an endoxylanase gene family, allowed the efficient recovery of full-length cDNA which could be expressed as functional proteins in yeast
5

Biodiversity of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi from extreme petroleum hydrocarbon contaminated site

Kong, Mengxuan 08 1900 (has links)
Les activités industrielles, la production d’énergie le transport et l’urbanisation ont engendré de sérieux problèmes environnementaux qui ont des effets néfastes non seulement pour les divers écosystèmes, mais aussi pour la santé des Humains. Il existe plusieurs méthodes de réhabilitation des sites contaminés. Les méthodes dites conventionnelles consistent le plus souvent à excaver, transporter et entreposer des sols dans des sites d’enfouissements, alors que d’autres technologies utilisent des traitements physico-chimiques ou l’incinération des polluants. Les inconvénients majeur de ces méthodes en sont le coût élevé, l’émission des gaz à effet de serre et la destruction des habitats. Cependant, plusieurs technologies ont émergé ces dernières décennies. Parmi ces technologies émergentes, la phytoremédiation est une méthode prometteuse et dont l’efficacité devienne de plus en plus reconnue. La phytoremédiation consiste à utiliser des plantes et les microbes qui leurs sont associés pour dégrader, extraire ou stabiliser les polluants du sol aussi bien organiques qu’inorganiques. Parmi les microbes associés aux racines des plantes, on trouve les champignons mycorhiziens arbusculaires (CMA) dont le rôle en phytoremédiation a été montré. Cependant, la diversité et les changements des structures des communautés de ces champignons dans des sites hautement contaminés et en association avec les populations des plantes qui poussent spontanément dans ces sites demeurent méconnues. L’objectif de mon projet de maitrise consiste à étudier la diversité et la structure des communautés des CMA dans les racines et les sols rhizosphériques de trois espèces de plantes Eleocharis elliptica, Populus tremuloides et Persicaria maculosa qui poussent spontanément dans des bassins d’une ancienne raffinerie pétro-chimique. J’ai échantillonné trois individus par espèce de plante dans trois bassins qui ont montré des concentrations différentes des polluants pétroliers. J’ai utilisé l’approche de la PCR conventionnelle, le clonage et le séquençage en ciblant le gène 18S de l’ARN ribosomique autant sur des échantillons de racines et des que sur ceux de sols rhizophériques. J’ai analysé au minimum 48 clones par échantillon. L’analyse de la diversité Beta a montré que la structure des communautés des CMA était significativement différente selon les biotopes (racines et sols rhizosphèriques) et les concentrations de contaminants pétroliers. Mes résultats ont montré que l'identité de la plante et la concentration de contaminants ont fortement influencé la structure des communautés de CMA. J’ai aussi observé qu’en plus de l’effet des facteurs biotiques et abiotiques mentionnés ci-dessus, plusieurs OTUs de CMA sont corrélés soit positivement ou négativement entre eux et aussi avec différents types de polluants d'hydrocarbures pétroliers. Cette étude a permis de comprendre les facteurs qui influencent les changements des structures des communautés des CMA et pourrait nous aider à améliorer l’efficacité de la phytoremédiation avec des plantes indigènes poussant spontanément sur des sites hautement contaminés par des hydrocarbures pétroliers. / Industrial activities, energy production, transportation, and urbanization have led to serious environmental problems that have negative effects not only for the natural ecosystems, but also for the human health. Several methods of rehabilitation of contaminated sites such as conventional methods consisting on excavation, transportation and storage of contaminated soils in landfills (known as Dig and Dump), as well as other technologies that use physical and chemical treatments or incineration of polluted soil pollutants, have been largely utilized. However, these methods are very costly and not environmental-friendly because of greenhouse gas emission and destruction of habitats. Several green technologies have emerged in recent decades. Among these emerging technologies, phytoremediation is a promising method whose effectiveness becomes increasingly recognized worldwide. Phytoremediation uses plant and their associated microbes to degrade, uptake or sequestrate organic and inorganic pollutants. Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) are among microbes that live intimately with plant root where they form a symbiosis known as arbuscular mycorrhiza. The objective of my master project was to study the diversity and changes of community structure of AMF in roots and rhizospheric soils of three native plant species Eleocharis elliptica, Populus tremuloides and Persicaria maculosa growing in petroleum-contaminated sedimentation basins of a former petro-chemical plant. I used conventional PCR, cloning and sequencing approach targeting 18S rRNA gene to investigate AMF community structure. I analyzed at minimum 48 clones for each sample. Beta diversity analyses showed that AMF community structure was significantly different across biotopes (roots and rhizospheric soils) and different concentrations of petroleum hydrocarbon contamination. Our results showed that plant identity and concentrations of petroleum hydrocarbon contaminations strongly influenced the AMF community structure as well as the inter-specific relationship among AMF taxa. Moreover, with consideration of both biotic and abiotic factors, we found that several AMF OTUs showed positive and negative correlations between each other and also with petroleum hydrocarbon pollutants. My study brings us in-valuable information to apply AMF for the phytoremediation in the future.
6

Influence of Soil Biogeochemical Properties on the Invasiveness of Old World Climbing Fern (Lygodium microphyllum)

Soti, Pushpa Gautam 31 October 2013 (has links)
The state of Florida has one of the most severe exotic species invasion problems in the United States, but little is known about their influence on soil biogeochemistry. My dissertation research includes a cross-continental field study in Australia, Florida, and greenhouse and growth chamber experiments, focused on the soil-plant interactions of one of the most problematic weeds introduced in south Florida, Lygodium microphyllum (Old World climbing fern). Analysis of field samples from the ferns introduced and their native range indicate that L microphyllum is highly dependent on arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) for phosphorus uptake and biomass accumulation. Relationship with AMF is stronger in relatively dry conditions, which are commonly found in some Florida sites, compared to more common wet sites where the fern is found in its native Australia. In the field, L. microphyllum is found to thrive in a wide range of soil pH, texture, and nutrient conditions, with strongly acidic soils in Australia and slightly acidic soils in Florida. Soils with pH 5.5 - 6.5 provide the most optimal growth conditions for L. microphyllum, and the growth declines significantly at soil pH 8.0, indicating that further reduction could happen in more alkaline soils. Comparison of invaded and uninvaded soil characteristics demonstrates that L. microphyllum can change the belowground soil environment, with more conspicuous impact on nutrient-poor sandy soils, to its own benefit by enhancing the soil nutrient status. Additionally, the nitrogen concentration in the leaves, which has a significant influence in the relative growth rate and photosynthesis, was significantly higher in Florida plants compared to Australian plants. Given that L. microphyllum allocates up to 40% of the total biomass to rhizomes, which aid in rapid regeneration after burning, cutting or chemical spray, hence management techniques targeting the rhizomes look promising. Over all, my results reveal for the first time that soil pH, texture, and AMF are major factors facilitating the invasive success of L. mcirophyllum. Finally, herbicide treatments targeting rhizomes will most likely become the widely used technique to control invasiveness of L. microphyllum in the future. However, a complete understanding of the soil ecosystem is necessary before adding any chemicals to the soil to achieve a successful long-term invasive species management strategy.
7

Étude de la biodiversité microbienne associée aux champignons mycorhiziens arbusculaires dans des sites hautement contaminés par des hydrocarbures pétroliers

Iffis, Bachir 07 1900 (has links)
Les champignons mycorhiziens à arbuscules (CMA) forment un groupe de champignons qui appartient à l'embranchement des Gloméromycètes (Glomeromycota). Les CMA forment des associations symbiotiques, connus sous le nom des mycorhizes à arbuscules avec plus de 80 % des plantes vasculaires terrestres. Une fois que les CMA colonisent les racines de plantes, ils améliorent leurs apports nutritionnels, notamment le phosphore et l'azote, et protègent les plantes contre les différents pathogènes du sol. En contrepartie, les plantes offrent un habitat et les ressources de carbone nécessaires pour le développement et la reproduction des CMA. Des études plus récentes ont démontré que les CMA peuvent aussi jouer des rôles clés dans la phytoremédiation des sols contaminés par les hydrocarbures pétroliers (HP) et les éléments traces métaliques. Toutefois, dans les écosystèmes naturels, les CMA établissent des associations tripartites avec les plantes hôtes et les microorganismes (bactéries et champignons) qui vivent dans la rhizosphère, l'endosphère (à l'intérieur des racines) et la mycosphère (sur la surface des mycéliums des CMA), dont certains d'entre eux jouent un rôle dans la translocation, l’immobilisation et/ou la dégradation des polluants organiques et inorganiques présents dans le sol. Par conséquent, la diversité des CMA et celle des microorganismes qui leur sont associés sont influencées par la concentration et la composition des polluants présents dans le sol, et aussi par les différents exsudats sécrétés par les trois partenaires (CMA, bactéries et les racines de plantes). Cependant, la diversité des CMA et celle des microorganismes qui leur sont associés demeure très peu connue dans les sols contaminés. Les interactions entre les CMA et ces microorganismes sont aussi méconnus aussi bien dans les aires naturelles que contaminées. Dans ce contexte, les objectifs de ma thèse sont: i) étudier la diversité des CMA et les microorganismes qui leur sont associés dans des sols contaminés par les HP, ii) étudier la variation de la diversité des CMA ainsi que celle des microorganismes qui leur sont associés par rapport au niveau de concentration en HP et aux espèces de plantes hôtes, iii) étudier les correlations (covariations) entre les CMA et les microorganismes qui leur sont associés et iv) comparer les communautés microbiennes trouvées dans les racines et sols contaminés par les HP avec celles trouvées en association avec les CMA. Pour ce faire, des spores et/ou des propagules de CMA ont été extraites à partir des racines et des sols de l'environnement racinaire de trois espèces de plantes qui poussaient spontanément dans trois bassins de décantation d'une ancienne raffinerie de pétrole située dans la Rive-Sud du fleuve St-Laurent, près de Montréal. Les spores et les propagules collectées, ainsi que des échantillons du sol et des racines ont été soumis à des techniques de PCR (nous avons ciblés les genes 16S de l'ARNr pour bactéries, les genes 18S de l'ARNr pour CMA et les régions ITS pour les autres champignons), de clonage, de séquençage de Sanger ou de séquençage à haut débit. Ensuite, des analyses bio-informatiques et statistiques ont été réalisées afin d'évaluer les effets des paramètres biotiques et abiotiques sur les communautés des CMA et les microorganismes qui leur sont associés. Mes résultats ont montré une diversité importante de bactéries et de champignons en association avec les spores et les propagules des CMA. De plus, la communauté microbienne associée aux spores des CMA a été significativement affectée par l'affiliation taxonomique des plantes hôtes et les niveaux de concentration en HP. D'autre part, les corrélations positives ou négatives qui ont été observées entre certaines espèces de CMA et microorganismes suggérèrent qu’en plus des effets de la concentration en HP et l'identité des plantes hôtes, les CMA peuvent aussi affecter la structure des communautés microbiennes qui vivent sur leurs spores et mycéliums. La comparaison entre les communautés microbiennes identifiées en association avec les spores et celles identifiées dans les racines montre que les communautés microbiennes recrutées par les CMA sont différentes de celles retrouvées dans les sols et les racines. En conclusion, mon projet de doctorat apporte de nouvelles connaissances importantes sur la diversité des CMA dans un environnement extrêmement pollué par les HP, et démontre que les interactions entre les CMA et les microorganismes qui leur sont associés sont plus compliquées que ce qu’on croyait précédemment. Par conséquent, d'autres travaux de recherche sont recommandés, dans le futur, afin de comprendre les processus de recrutement des microorganismes par les CMA dans les différents environnements. / Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) are an important soil fungal group that belongs to the phylum Glomeromycota. AMF form symbiosic associations known as arbuscular mycorrhiza with more than 80% of vascular plants on earth. Once AMF colonize plant roots, they promote nutrient uptake, in particular phosphorus and nitrogen, and protect plants against soil-borne pathogens. In turn, plants provide AMF with carbon resources and habitat. Furthermore, more recent studies demonstrated that AMF may also play key roles in phytoremediation of soils contaminated with petroleum hydrocarbon pollutants (PHP) and trace elements. Though, in natural ecosystems, AMF undergo tripartite associations with host plants and micoorganisms (Bacteria and Fungi) living in rhizosphere (the narrow region of soil surounding the plant roots), endosphere (inside roots) and mycosphere (on the surface AMF mycelia), which some of them play a key role on translocation, immobilization and/or degradation of organic and inorganic pollutants. Consequently, the diversity and community structures of AMF and their associated microorganisms are influenced by the composition and concentration of pollutants and exudates released by the three partners (AMF, bacteria and plant roots). However, little is known about the diversity of AMF and their associated microorganisms in polluted soils and the interaction between AMF and these microorganisms remains poorly understood both in natural and contaminated areas. In this context, the objectives of my thesis were to: i) study the diversity of AMF and their associated microorganisms in PHP contaminated soils, ii) study the variation in diversity and community structures of AMF and their associated microorganisms across plant species identity and PHP concentrations, iii) study the correlations (covariations) between AMF species and their associated microorganisms and iv) compare microbial community structures of PHP contaminated soils and roots with those associated with AMF spores in order to determine if the microbial communities shaped on the surface of AMF spores and mycelia are different from those identified in soil and roots. To do so, AMF spores and/or their intraradical propagules were harvested from rhizospheric soil and roots of three plant species growing spontaneously in three distinct waste decantation basins of a former petrochemical plant located on the south shore of the St-Lawrence River, near Montreal. The harvested spores and propagules, as well as samples of soils and roots were subjected to PCR (we target 16S rRNA genes for bacteria, 18S rRNA genes for AMF and ITS regions for the other fungi), cloning, Sanger sequencing or 454 high throughput sequencing. Then, bioinformatics and statistics were performed to evaluate the effects of biotic and abiotic driving forces on AMF and their associated microbial communities. My results showed high fungal and bacterial diversity associated with AMF spores and propagules in PHP contaminated soils. I also observed that the microbial community structures associated with AMF spores were significantly affected by plant species identity and PHP concentrations. Furthermore, I observed positive and negative correlations between some AMF species and some AMF-associated microorganisms, suggesting that in addition to PHP concentrations and plant species identity, AMF species may also play a key role in shaping the microbial community surrounding their spores. Comparisons between the AMF spore-associated microbiome and the whole microbiome found in rhizospheric soil and roots showed that AMF spores recruit a microbiome differing from those found in the surrounding soil and roots. Overall, my PhD project brings a new level of knowledge on AMF diversity on extremely polluted environment and demonstrates that interaction of AMF and their associated microbes is much complex that we though previously. Further investigations are needed to better understand how AMF select and reward their associated microbes in different environments.
8

Comparative mitochondrial genomics toward understanding genetics and evolution of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi

Nadimi, Maryam 03 1900 (has links)
Les champignons mycorhiziens arbusculaires (CMA) sont très répandus dans le sol où ils forment des associations symbiotiques avec la majorité des plantes appelées mycorhizes arbusculaires. Le développement des CMA dépend fortement de la plante hôte, de telle sorte qu'ils ne peuvent vivre à l'état saprotrophique, par conséquent ils sont considérés comme des biotrophes obligatoires. Les CMA forment une lignée évolutive basale des champignons et ils appartiennent au phylum Glomeromycota. Leurs mycélia sont formés d’un réseau d’hyphes cénocytiques dans lesquelles les noyaux et les organites cellulaires peuvent se déplacer librement d’un compartiment à l’autre. Les CMA permettent à la plante hôte de bénéficier d'une meilleure nutrition minérale, grâce au réseau d'hyphes extraradiculaires, qui s'étend au-delà de la zone du sol explorée par les racines. Ces hyphes possèdent une grande capacité d'absorption d’éléments nutritifs qui vont être transportés par ceux-ci jusqu’aux racines. De ce fait, les CMA améliorent la croissance des plantes tout en les protégeant des stresses biotiques et abiotiques. Malgré l’importance des CMA, leurs génétique et évolution demeurent peu connues. Leurs études sont ardues à cause de leur mode de vie qui empêche leur culture en absence des plantes hôtes. En plus leur diversité génétique intra-isolat des génomes nucléaires, complique d’avantage ces études, en particulier le développement des marqueurs moléculaires pour des études biologiques, écologiques ainsi que les fonctions des CMA. C’est pour ces raisons que les génomes mitochondriaux offrent des opportunités et alternatives intéressantes pour étudier les CMA. En effet, les génomes mitochondriaux (mt) publiés à date, ne montrent pas de polymorphismes génétique intra-isolats. Cependant, des exceptions peuvent exister. Pour aller de l’avant avec la génomique mitochondriale, nous avons besoin de générer beaucoup de données de séquençages de l’ADN mitochondrial (ADNmt) afin d’étudier les méchanismes évolutifs, la génétique des population, l’écologie des communautés et la fonction des CMA. Dans ce contexte, l’objectif de mon projet de doctorat consiste à: 1) étudier l’évolution des génomes mt en utilisant l’approche de la génomique comparative au niveau des espèces proches, des isolats ainsi que des espèces phylogénétiquement éloignées chez les CMA; 2) étudier l’hérédité génétique des génomes mt au sein des isolats de l’espèce modèle Rhizophagus irregularis par le biais des anastomoses ; 3) étudier l’organisation des ADNmt et les gènes mt pour le développement des marqueurs moléculaires pour des études phylogénétiques. Nous avons utilisé l’approche dite ‘whole genome shotgun’ en pyroséquençage 454 et Illumina HiSeq pour séquencer plusieurs taxons de CMA sélectionnés selon leur importance et leur disponibilité. Les assemblages de novo, le séquençage conventionnel Sanger, l’annotation et la génomique comparative ont été réalisés pour caractériser des ADNmt complets. Nous avons découvert plusieurs mécanismes évolutifs intéressant chez l’espèce Gigaspora rosea dans laquelle le génome mt est complètement remanié en comparaison avec Rhizophagus irregularis isolat DAOM 197198. En plus nous avons mis en évidence que deux gènes cox1 et rns sont fragmentés en deux morceaux. Nous avons démontré que les ARN transcrits les deux fragments de cox1 se relient entre eux par épissage en trans ‘Trans-splicing’ à l’aide de l’ARN du gene nad5 I3 qui met ensemble les deux ARN cox1.1 et cox1.2 en formant un ARN complet et fonctionnel. Nous avons aussi trouvé une organisation de l’ADNmt très particulière chez l’espèce Rhizophagus sp. Isolat DAOM 213198 dont le génome mt est constitué par deux chromosomes circulaires. En plus nous avons trouvé une quantité considérable des séquences apparentées aux plasmides ‘plasmid-related sequences’ chez les Glomeraceae par rapport aux Gigasporaceae, contribuant ainsi à une évolution rapide des ADNmt chez les Glomeromycota. Nous avons aussi séquencé plusieurs isolats de l’espèces R. irregularis et Rhizophagus sp. pour décortiquer leur position phylogénéque et inférer des relations évolutives entre celles-ci. La comparaison génomique mt nous montré l’existence de plusieurs éléments mobiles comme : des cadres de lecture ‘open reading frames (mORFs)’, des séquences courtes inversées ‘short inverted repeats (SIRs)’, et des séquences apparentées aux plasimdes ‘plasmid-related sequences (dpo)’ qui impactent l’ordre des gènes mt et permettent le remaniement chromosomiques des ADNmt. Tous ces divers mécanismes évolutifs observés au niveau des isolats, nous permettent de développer des marqueurs moléculaires spécifiques à chaque isolat ou espèce de CMA. Les données générées dans mon projet de doctorat ont permis d’avancer les connaissances fondamentales des génomes mitochondriaux non seulement chez les Glomeromycètes, mais aussi de chez le règne des Fungi et les eucaryotes en général. Les trousses moléculaires développées dans ce projet peuvent servir à des études de la génétique des populations, des échanges génétiques et l’écologie des CMA ce qui va contribuer à la compréhension du rôle primorial des CMA en agriculture et environnement. / Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) are the most widespread eukaryotic symbionts, forming mutualistic associations known as Arbuscular Mycorrhizae with the majority of plantroots. AMF are obligate biotrophs belonging to an ancient fungal lineage of phylum Glomeromycota. Their mycelia are formed by a complex network made up of coenocytic hyphae, where nuclei and cell organelles can freely move from one compartment to another. AMF are commonly acknowledged to improve plant growth by enhancing mineral nutrient uptake, in particular phosphate and nitrate, and they confer tolerance to abiotic and biotic stressors for plants. Despite their significant roles in ecosystems, their genetics and evolution are not well understood. Studying AMF is challenging due to their obligate biotrophy, their slow growth, and their limited morphological criteria. In addition, intra-isolate genetic polymorphism of nuclear DNA brings another level of complexity to the investigation of the biology, ecology and function of AMF. Genetic polymorphism of nuclear DNA within a single isolate limits the development of efficient molecular markers mainly at lower taxonomic levels (i.e. the inter-isolate level). Instead, mitochondrial (mt) genomics have been used as an attractive alternative to study AMF. In AMF, mt genomes have been shown to be homogeneous, or at least much less polymorphic than nuclear DNA. However, by generating large mt sequence datasets we can investigate the efficiency and usefulness of developing molecular marker toolkits in order to study the dynamic and evolutionary mechanisms of AMF. This approach also elucidates the population genetics, community ecology and functions of Glomeromycota. Therefore, the objectives of my Ph.D. project were: 1) To investigate mitochondrial genome evolution using comparative mitogenomic analyses of closely related species and isolates as well as phylogenetically distant taxa of AMF; 2) To explore mt genome inheritance among compatible isolates of the model AMF Rhizophagus irregularis through anastomosis formation; and 3) To assess mtDNA and mt genes for marker development and phylogenetic analyses. We used whole genome shotgun, 454 pyrosequencing and HiSeq Illimina to sequence AMF taxa selected according to their importance and availability in our lab collections. De novo assemblies, Sanger sequencing, annotation and comparative genomics were then performed to characterize complete mtDNAs. We discovered interesting evolutionary mechanisms in Gigaspora rosea: 1) we found a fully reshuffled mt genome synteny compared to Rhizaphagus irregularis DAOM 197198; and 2) we discovered the presence of fragmented cox1 and rns genes. We demonstrated that two cox1 transcripts are joined by trans-splicing. We also reported an unusual mtDNA organization in Rhizophagus sp. DAOM 213198, whose mt genome consisted of two circular mtDNAs. In addition, we observed a considerably higher number of mt plasmidrelated sequences in Glomeraceae compared with Gigasporaceae, contributing a mechanism for faster evolution of mtDNA in Glomeromycota. We also sequenced other isolates of R. irregularis and Rhizophagus sp. in order to unravel their evolutionary relationships and to develop molecular toolkits for their discrimination. Comparative mitogenomic analyses of these mtDNAs revealed the occurrence of many mobile elements such as mobile open reading frames (mORFs), short inverted repeats (SIRs), and plasmid-related sequences (dpo) that impact mt genome synteny and mtDNA alteration. All together, these evolutionary mechanisms among closely related AMF isolates give us clues for designing reliable and efficient intra- and inter-specific markers to discriminate closely related AMF taxa and isolates. Data generated in my Ph.D. project advances our knowledge of mitochondrial genomes evolution not only in Glomeromycota, but also in the larger framework of the Fungal kingdom and Eukaryotes in general. Molecular toolkits developed in this project will offer new opportunities to study population genetics, genetic exchanges and ecology of AMF. In turn, this work will contribute to understanding the role of these fungi in nature, with potential applications in both agriculture and environmental protection.
9

The evolution of RNA interference system, blue light sensing mechanism and circadian clock in Rhizophagus irregularis give insight on Arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis

Lee, Soon-Jae 08 1900 (has links)
No description available.

Page generated in 0.095 seconds