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  • About
  • The Global ETD Search service is a free service for researchers to find electronic theses and dissertations. This service is provided by the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations.
    Our metadata is collected from universities around the world. If you manage a university/consortium/country archive and want to be added, details can be found on the NDLTD website.
1

Arthur Bliss's emerging voice a study of two song cycles on texts by Li Po /

Johnson, Mary Ellen. January 1900 (has links)
Treatise (D.M.A.)--University of Texas at Austin, 2003. / Vita. Includes bibliographical references. Includes discography.
2

'Oh My Pen Drops From Me Here' Bliss, Pleasure and Sexual Encounter in the Erotic Novel

Johnson, Justine 29 August 2011 (has links)
This thesis explores three accounts of male erotic fantasy. In my second chapter, I apply Roland Barthes’ conceptions of bliss and pleasure to John Cleland’s 18th century erotic novel, Fanny Hill, or Memoirs of a Woman of Pleasure in order to test Barthes’ theory. In my third chapter, I use D. H. Lawrence’s own erotic theory to analyze his depictions of boredom, tenderness and the mind/body divide in his 20th century novel, Lady Chatterley’s Lover. In my fourth chapter, I rely on the theory of sadomasochism to explore the ways in which pleasure, pain and degradation figure in the Pauline Réage’s 20th century sadomasochistic novel, Story of O. In all three of these novels, erotic pleasure, love and transcendence are central themes and I ultimately elucidate the ways in which Cleland, Lawrence and Réage strategically use them to influence the reader’s reception of their accounts of male erotic fantasy.
3

Bliss som medium och språk : alternativ interpersonell kommunikation

Eriksson, Maria, Eriksson, Johannes January 2002 (has links)
No description available.
4

Bliss som medium och språk : alternativ interpersonell kommunikation

Eriksson, Maria, Eriksson, Johannes January 2002 (has links)
No description available.
5

Arthur Bliss Lane American career diplomat.

Sylvester, John Andrew, January 1967 (has links)
Thesis (Ph. D.)--University of Wisconsin--Madison, 1967. / Typescript. Vita. Description based on print version record. Includes bibliographical references (leaves 167-178).
6

Philip Paul Bliss and the musical, cultural and religious sources of the gospel music tradition in the United States 1850-1876 /

Smucker, David J. Rempel January 1900 (has links)
Thesis (Ph. D.)--Boston University Graduate School, 1981. / Typescript. Vita. Includes bibliographical references (leaves 393-420). Discography: leaves 420-421.
7

Bliss Delight and Pleasure in Paradise Lost

Avin, Ittamar Johanan January 2001 (has links)
There have been many studies of keywords in Paradise Lost. Over the last fifty or so years words such as �wander�, �lapse�, �error�, �fruit�, �balmy�, �fall�, �hands�, among others, have attracted critics� attention. The present enquiry brings under scrutiny three linked keywords which have up to now escaped notice. These are the words �bliss�, �delight�, and �pleasure�. The fundamental proposition of the thesis is that Milton does not use these words haphazardly or interchangeably in his epic poem (though in other of his poetic productions he is by no means as fastidious). On the contrary, he self-consciously distinguishes among the three terms, assigning to each its own particular �theatre of operations�. Meant by this is that each keyword is selectively referred to a separate structural division of the epic, thus, �bliss� has reference specifically to Heaven (or to the earthly paradise viewed as a simulacrum of Heaven), �delight� to the earthly paradise in Eden and to the prelapsarian condition nourished by it; while �pleasure�, whose signification is ambiguous, refers in its favourable sense (which is but little removed from �delight�) to the Garden and the sensations associated with it, and in its unfavourable one to postlapsarian sensations and to the fallen characters. Insofar as the three structural divisions taken into account (Hell is not) are hierarchically organized in the epic, so too are the three keywords that answer to them. Moreover, in relating keywords to considerations of structure, the thesis breaks new ground in Paradise Lost studies.
8

Computer augmented communication in the daily life of severely disabled speech impaired children

Salminen, Anna-Liisa January 2000 (has links)
This study investigated the impact of Bliss based computer augmented communication (CAC) on the daily communication and daily activities of severely disabled speech impaired children from a Finnish school for disabled children from the point of view of the children, their discussion partners and therapists; it also investigated the value and meaning of the CAC devices for them. The school staff had considerable experience in the use of computers with disabled children, but only a few had any experience of CAC. In order to gain a rich understanding of the subject matter, a qualitative multiple case study approach was adopted. The longitudinal study investigated CAC in the real life environments of six severely disabled speech impaired children, aged 7 to 15 years, their parents, helpers, teachers, speech therapists and occupational therapists. All of the speech impaired children had cerebral palsy and their main mode of communication was Blissymbolics, used with the aid of a communication folder. The multiple methods of data collection used in the study included interviews, videotaped observations, the Assessment of Communication Skills Questionnaire, essays and data logs. The data gathering started before the participants received their CAC devices and continued 3,6 and 12 months after they received the devices: it involved studying participants in three different communicative environments. The data analysis was conducted by a narrative analysis of each individual case, which was followed up with a cross-case analysis. The process of CAC was highly individual and context dependent. During the study all the speech impaired participants learned to operate their CAC devices. Their initial enthusiasm begant o decreaseth ree to six months after the participants received their devices.A t the end of the study year, one of the participants used his CAC device nearly daily in two of his communicative environments, two of them used their devices regularly a couple of times a week, two of them hardly at all, and one not at all. The CAC devices were hardly used for face-to-face communication, they were mainly used for educational purposes, written communication, play and leisure. The children and their discussion partners perceived that the main reasons for not using CAC devices were the poor usability of devices, such as slow speed of CAC and insufficient vocabularies, and insufficient related services. During the CAC process the motivation to communicate of four participants increased, the communication folder use of three participants increased and vocalisations of two participants increased. V Despite of the perceived limitations of CAC, the speech impaired children considered the CAC devices important for them and helpful primarily in school work and play. Participants' discussion partners assessed that CAC enriched the children's communication and increased dialogue between themselves and the children. Discussion partners also considered as particularly important the participants' independence in being able to operate the CAC devices themselves and their possibility to use voice output. New opportunities provided by CAC devices were especially meaningful to the participants' parents. The study showed that CAC requires substantial highly specialised services and a number of recommendations were made on the basis of the study. CAC interventions should focus on not only the operative and communication skills of the users. Professionals conducting CAC interventions should evaluate more carefully what users need and subsequently evaluate whether the CAC devices meet these needs. They should also understand and support the motivational processes and psychosocial aspects of developing the use of CAC. The findings suggest that CAC devices should be introduced to severely disabled speech impaired children as an additional mode of communication for face-to-face and indirect communicative purposes and within the context of meaningful activities. This study has shown that CAC is an extremely complex phenomenon with a mixture of interrelated elements that affect the daily communication and daily activities of severely disabled speech impaired children.
9

Bliss Delight and Pleasure in Paradise Lost

Avin, Ittamar Johanan January 2001 (has links)
There have been many studies of keywords in Paradise Lost. Over the last fifty or so years words such as �wander�, �lapse�, �error�, �fruit�, �balmy�, �fall�, �hands�, among others, have attracted critics� attention. The present enquiry brings under scrutiny three linked keywords which have up to now escaped notice. These are the words �bliss�, �delight�, and �pleasure�. The fundamental proposition of the thesis is that Milton does not use these words haphazardly or interchangeably in his epic poem (though in other of his poetic productions he is by no means as fastidious). On the contrary, he self-consciously distinguishes among the three terms, assigning to each its own particular �theatre of operations�. Meant by this is that each keyword is selectively referred to a separate structural division of the epic, thus, �bliss� has reference specifically to Heaven (or to the earthly paradise viewed as a simulacrum of Heaven), �delight� to the earthly paradise in Eden and to the prelapsarian condition nourished by it; while �pleasure�, whose signification is ambiguous, refers in its favourable sense (which is but little removed from �delight�) to the Garden and the sensations associated with it, and in its unfavourable one to postlapsarian sensations and to the fallen characters. Insofar as the three structural divisions taken into account (Hell is not) are hierarchically organized in the epic, so too are the three keywords that answer to them. Moreover, in relating keywords to considerations of structure, the thesis breaks new ground in Paradise Lost studies.
10

Blissful Realism: Saul Bellow, John Updike, and the Modern/Postmodern Divide

Jansen, Todd Edward January 2013 (has links)
This dissertation examines the reaction of many post-WWII American authors against the modernist privileging of form. These authors predicate their response upon what I call "blissful realism," a term which reflects an unlikely conflation of the critical work of Roland Barthes and Georg Lukács. I argue that Saul Bellow and John Updike are exemplars of a larger post-war contingent, including Flannery O'Conner, Bernard Malamud, Joyce Carol Oates, and John Cheever, to name a few, who use the liminal space between the waning of modernism and a burgeoning postmodern sensibility to complicate and critique modernist formalism while exploring (and often presciently critiquing) the nascent ontological inclinations of postmodernism. The characters within their novels endeavor to declare and maintain their autonomy by, through, and against their contact with a cold reality and defining ideological structures. This tension is mirrored in the aesthetic project of the authors as they work by, through, and against modernist strictures. This dissertation also offers a comparison between Bellow and Updike and the work of Ralph Ellison and Vladimir Nabokov in an effort to distinguish and delineate blissful realism from "late modernism." The concluding chapter posits that recent "post-postmodern" work draws heavily on its blissful realist predecessors. Many contemporary authors' concerns with subjective autonomy, authenticity, and notions of transcendence, in spite of postmodern declarations to the contrary, offer different sensibilities and political possibilities that turn away from irony, play, and image toward agency, meaning, and morality.

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