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  • About
  • The Global ETD Search service is a free service for researchers to find electronic theses and dissertations. This service is provided by the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations.
    Our metadata is collected from universities around the world. If you manage a university/consortium/country archive and want to be added, details can be found on the NDLTD website.
1

Component Descriptor Frames : A representation to support the storage and retrieval of reusable software components

Wood, M. I. January 1988 (has links)
No description available.
2

Making efficient use of microcomputers in primary schools through the development of a software cataloguing system

Shaylor, J. January 1986 (has links)
No description available.
3

Bibliographic information systems for manuscripts in Turkey

Kucuk, Mehmet Emin January 1996 (has links)
No description available.
4

The use of cataloguing tools and resources by cataloguers in the University of Malawi libraries and the Malawi National Library service in providing access to information /

Nampeya, Chrissie Ennie. January 2009 (has links)
Thesis (M.I.S.) - University of KwaZulu-Natal, Pietermaritzburg, 2009. / Full text also available online. Scroll down for electronic link.
5

Intute: from a distributed network to a unified database – lessons learned

Kerr, Linda 12 1900 (has links)
Intute (http://www.intute.ac.uk/) catalogues and describes the best Internet resources for education and research. It is funded by the Joint Information Systems Committee (JISC), and is primarily aimed at evaluating web resources suitable for undergraduate study. The service also offers Internet research skills tutorials, rss feeds of new resources added to the catalogue, a personalisation service (MyIntute), and a blog highlighting trends in Internet research skills and particularly good or topical subject-based resources. The current Intute catalogue of Internet resources is an aggregation of records from eight subject services previously funded by the JISC as the Resource Discovery Network (RDN). This paper describes the process and challenges of integrating these eight databases into one unified catalogue with one standard metadata schema, whilst continuing to satisfy the needs of different subject communities. The paper also outlines a current project to evaluate and compare the cost-effectiveness of manual and automatic metadata creation.
6

The link between cataloguing and classification curricula and job requirements in South Africa

Sibiya, Philangani Thembinkosi January 2017 (has links)
A dissertation submitted to the Faculty of Arts in fulfillment of the requirements for the Degree of Masters in the Department of Library and Information Studies at the University Of Zululand, 2017 / This study investigated the link between cataloguing and classification curricula and the cataloguing and classification job requirements in South Africa. This is necessary because it is not known whether Library and Information Science (LIS) schools teach what the South Africa LIS job market requires. In order to determine whether the cataloguing and classification curricula meet the requirements of employers, cataloguing and classification course outlines were requested and received from six LIS schools. Ten cataloguing and classification advertisements for vacant posts were taken from two weekly newspapers (Sunday Times and Mail & Guardian) and the Library and Information Association of South Africa (LIASA) listserv. A total of 18 professional cataloguers and classifiers from public and academic libraries were involved in the study, which was informed by the interpretive paradigm, while a qualitative research approach was adopted. Qualitative content analysis was used as a research method and for data analysis. A content analysis schedule for the course outlines and professional vacancy advertisements were designed for data collection purposes. An interview schedule was also designed for data collection from professional cataloguers. The results indicate that cataloguing and classification is offered at the bachelor’s degree and postgraduate diploma levels in LIS schools in South Africa, but it is noted that it is also offered at an undergraduate diploma level. No course outlines were provided by LIS schools teaching the courses at diploma level. Cataloguing and classification courses aim to equip students with knowledge on how to organise information in a library environment. The outcomes of these courses are based on the contents offered by LIS schools. In a nutshell, upon completion of these courses students are expected to use both traditional and techno centric methods to organise information materials. Cataloguing and classification contents include AACR2, RDA, DDC, LCC, LCSH, indexing and abstracting and other contents. Data from professional personnel employment advertisements indicate that an undergraduate diploma, a bachelor’s degree or a postgraduate diploma is required for appointment as a cataloguer. At least two years’ relevant professional experience is also needed. Cataloguers chiefly require computer skills, communication skills, interpersonal skills, among others. Based on the published knowledge requirement, cataloguers need to have a knowledge of AACR2, RDA and DDC library systems, for example Millennium software or SLIMS. Among the duties of a cataloguer the most dominant requirement was the ability to catalogue and classify library materials using cataloguing tools. Cataloguers stated the need in their professions for knowledge and skills similar to those stated in the employment vacancy advertisements. They emphasised the knowledge of RDA as it is a priority requirement in both academic and public libraries. The results obtained from cataloguers revealed that the best attitudes for a cataloguer are love for the job, being a lifelong learner, with honesty and integrity, and many others as detailed in Chapter 5. Cataloguers believe that the curricula offered by LIS schools based on these courses are not sufficient, more especially in the bachelor’s degree in LIS. Their concern is mostly based on the amount of practical tuition and experience included in these courses: cataloguers mentioned that the time provided is limited. The study therefore concludes that the curricula offered by LIS schools are in line with what employers are looking for. The study recommends that LIS schools build strong links/relationships with libraries to improve their cataloguing and classification curricula. Employers of cataloguers are advised to provide continuous training to their employees so that they remain relevant in their professional field. Cataloguers and classifiers themselves must be lifelong learners in order to remain relevant in their field since it is dynamic.
7

The use of cataloguing tools and resources by cataloguers in the University of Malawi libraries and the Malawi National Library service in providing access to information.

Nampeya, Chrissie Ennie. January 2009 (has links)
This study investigated the us e of cataloguing tools and resour ces in the University of Malawi (UNIMA) Libraries and the Malawi National Library Service (MNLS) in providing access to information. Cataloguing tools and resources are mainly used by cataloguers to process library materials fo r easy location and access to the collection. The cataloguer’s goal is to meet user needs and make available materials and services for the purpose of supporting the learning, te aching and research needs of the UNIMA Libraries and the MNLS. Cataloguing practice in most of the acad emic and public libraries in developing countries has lagged behind due to financial constraints. Poor budget allocations and economic problems have forced many libraries to operate inefficiently without preparing cataloguers for the work with effective training. The UNIMA Libraries and the MNLS have also been affected by this economic problem. In order to find out how catal oguing tools and resources are being used by cataloguers in UNIMA Libraries and the MNLS in providing access to information, a study sample consisting of fifty cataloguers and directors (Librarians) of libraries was chosen. The cataloguers and directors of libra ries were surveyed by means of a self administered questionnaire a nd an interview schedule to investigate availability and use of cataloguing tools and re sources and the effectiveness of the services to provide for the information needs of the users. Other information requested from the respondents related to the probl ems encountered with the tool s and training offered to the cataloguers. A to tal of thirty-fiv e cataloguers and directors of libraries responded yielding a 70 % response rate. The results were analysed using SPSS. The results were shown in the form of tables and figures. The study revealed that the majority of cataloguers in the UNIMA Libraries and the MNLS used the cataloguing t ools and resources but relati vely infrequently. Results also revealed that the cata loguers encountered various pr oblems with the tools which most of them attributed to a lack of training to adequately prepare them for cataloguing requirements. In addition, the majority of libraries had cataloguing iv backlogs which were attribut ed to various factors such as a lack of professionally trained staff in cataloguing and a lack of cataloguing tools and resources. Recommendations and sugges tions to improve the catal oguing practice in general were made by both the researcher and re spondents with regard to the findings and the literature reviewed. / Thesis (M.I.S.)-University of KwaZulu-Natal, Pietermaritzburg, 2009.
8

The catalog’s one-many problem : reading the Walker Art Center’s online collection catalog

Galletly, Barbara Catherine 27 November 2013 (has links)
A museum catalog is a legible, interpretable information system that acts as a rhetorical exposition of the museum’s collection and work. The unity of a collection is of course distinct from that represented in a catalog, and still further from the reader’s experience of it. But the information that comprises such an assemblage of individual records or representations, consistent metadata, support the ability to “read” collections as finite, enclosed, or complete. Here I perform a close reading of the elements and relationships that underpin the Walker Art Center’s online Permanent Collection catalog, an emergent publication funded by The Getty Foundation’s Online Scholarly Catalog Initiative (OSCI). I incorporate multiple layers of interpretation into my reading of the structure and contents of the museum website, drawing on concepts developed in information science and textual studies by Bonnie Mak and Johanna Drucker. My performance of reading of the new catalog helps me begin to address how collectively, online representation in virtual frames, contextualization within a website, searching, and browsing support divergent interpretations of a collection catalogue as a text. I conclude that to engage a catalog at a scholarly level, and to interpret and synthesize meaning of the catalog as a text, the museum must situate its self-representation spatially and temporally. / text
9

Fasilitering van die voortgesette opleidingsbehoeftes vir professionele katalogiseerders in Suid-Afrika : 'n raamwerk vir selfgerigte leer

de Klerk, Maria Albertina Dorothea January 2016 (has links)
This dissertation reports on an exploratory study of a self-directed learning framework for South African cataloguers (increasingly becoming known as metadata specialists) for facilitating their continuing education needs. The study is triggered by the 2010 report of the South African Department of Arts and Culture, which found that newly qualified information specialists cataloguers included were in practice not yet able to perform professional tasks. Continuing education is characteristic of professions and essential for keeping one's professional knowledge up to date. The study focused on the question of a framework required to support and bridge the continuing education needs of professional cataloguers in South Africa. It examines professionals' knowledge of organising information, the nature and role of selfdirected learning in their continuing education and the extent of cataloguers' commitment to selfdirected learning. These aspects are described in the research goal, namely to propose a selfdirected learning framework that cataloguers can use to facilitate their ongoing training needs. The study contains a literature review and an empirical component based on a mixed methods research approach. A survey was conducted in April-May 2015 as research method. Quantitative data was collected using a structured questionnaire (59 participants), supplemented by qualitative data from three semi-structured focus group interviews. An exploratory profile of the state of continuing education for South African cataloguers and their needs could accordingly be drawn up. Findings indicate that "self-direction" is not only related to the personality of the cataloguer. It also pertains to the process of self-directed learning and the context in which it takes place. Several theories on self-directed learning were compared to design a framework that speaks to the continuing education needs of cataloguers. Three concepts professional context, people (individuals, in collaboration with others) and learning (processes, theories and opportunities) form the background against which the framework was developed. The study concludes with recommendations about a framework for self-directed learning. It includes, inter alia, a national programme for continuing information organisation training, and the development of selfdirection in learning as a multifaceted personality trait recommended for continuing education in information organisation. Further research possibilities in relation to selfdirected learning and the self-directed learning framework are also mentioned. / Hierdie verhandeling rapporteer oor 'n verkennende studie aangaande 'n selfgerigteleerraamwerk vir Suid-Afrikaanse katalogiseerders (toenemend bekend as metadataspesialiste) vir die fasilitering van hul voortgesette opleidingsbehoeftes. Die studie is ontlok deur die 2010- verslag van die Suid-Afrikaanse Departement van Kuns en Kultuur, wat bevind het dat inligtingspesialiste insluitend katalogiseerders wat pas gekwalifiseer het, nog nie in staat is om professionele take in die praktyk uit te voer nie. Voortgesette opleiding is 'n eienskap van professies en onontbeerlik vir die byhou van professionele kennis. Die studie word gerig deur die vraag oor hoe 'n raamwerk sou lyk wat die voortgesette opleidingsbehoeftes van professionele katalogiseerders in Suid-Afrika sal ondervang en oorbrug. Die studie ondersoek professionele kennis van inligtingsorganisasie, die aard en rol van selfgerigte leer in voortgesette opleiding en tot watter mate katalogiseerders op selfgerigte leer ingestel is. Hierdie aspekte word vervat in die ondersoekdoelstelling, naamlik om 'n selfgerigteleer-raamwerk voor te stel wat benut kan word om die voortgesette leer van katalogiseerders te fasiliteer . Afgesien van literatuurontledings, sluit die studie 'n empiriese komponent in wat 'n gemengdeondersoekbenadering volg. 'n Opname in April-Mei 2015 is as navorsingsmetode aangewend. Kwantitatiewe data is versamel deur 'n gestruktureerde vraelys (59 deelnemers), aangevul deur kwalitatiewe data uit drie semigestruktureerde fokusgroeponderhoude. Daaruit kon 'n verkennende profiel van die Suid-Afrikaanse voortgesette opleidingsituasie en behoeftes vir katalogiseerders opgebou word. Bevindinge toon dat "selfgerigtheid" nie net met die persoonlikheid van die katalogiseerder verband hou nie. Dit behels ook die proses van selfgerigte leer en die konteks waarin dit plaasvind. Verskeie selfgerigteleerteorieë is in verband met mekaar gebring om 'n raamwerk te ontwerp wat die behoeftes van katalogiseerders aan voortgesette opleiding aanspreek. Drie begrippe professionele konteks, persoon (individue, in samewerking met ander) en leer (prosesse, teorieë en geleenthede) vorm die agtergrond waarteen die raamwerk ontwikkel is. Die studie word afgesluit met aanbevelings oor 'n raamwerk vir selfgerigte leer. Dit sluit onder meer in 'n nasionale program vir voortgesette inligtingsorganisasieopleiding, en 'n aanmoediging tot die ontwikkeling van selfgerigtheid in leer tydens voortgesette opleiding as 'n veelkantige persoonlikheidseienskap vir inligtingsorganisasie. Verdere navorsingsmoontlikhede met betrekking tot selfgerigte leer en die selfgerigteleer-raamwerk word genoem. / Dissertation (MIS)--University of Pretoria, 2016. / Information Science / MIS / Unrestricted
10

Factors influencing the rendering of services in academic libraries

Hosana, Faith Rhulani January 2003 (has links)
Magister Bibliothecologiae - MBibl / In the field of user studies, very little research has been done on rendering of services in academic libraries. These services need to be examined in depth in order to be able to provide academic library users with more appropriate information services. There is clearly a need to determine what the real needs of academic library users are and how they prefer to look for information. The rapid growth of information technology could have a great influence on service rendering to academic library users.

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