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  • About
  • The Global ETD Search service is a free service for researchers to find electronic theses and dissertations. This service is provided by the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations.
    Our metadata is collected from universities around the world. If you manage a university/consortium/country archive and want to be added, details can be found on the NDLTD website.
1

Believing to Belong: Negotiation and Expression of American Identity at a Non-religious Camp

Bullivant, Spencer Culham January 2015 (has links)
This dissertation presents results of ethnographic study at a non-religious summer camp called Camp Quest Montana in the summer of 2011 and the numerous insights gained into the lived experiences of non-religious Americans. These particular Americans, because of their non-religion, have experienced unique pressures while navigating through life in a country that is and has been dominated by religious identification and belief. The ethnographic accounts gathered over the course of a week at Camp Quest Montana show how these non-religious people were using a language of belief, informed by a spirituality derived from science, as part of an effort to fit themselves into this wider and religiously steeped American culture. This dissertation argues that the Camp Questers express themselves through a language of “belief” because of the current and historical pressures to be religious, along with Americans’ tendency to distrust non-religious people. Using “belief” language allows them to talk about themselves in a way that makes sense to religious Americans, while also maintaining a non-religious identification. Moreover, this study found differences between how first and second-generation non-religious Americans (the parents and children at Camp Quest Montana) interact with religious Americans. These variations are important because they point to different experiences of the social and cultural landscape of the United States, differences that are reflected in each generation’s non-religious expression. This data also presents a challenge to current arguments regarding the benefits of religion to the socialization and overall well-being of youth.
2

Det katolska prismat : En kvalitativ studie om vardagsreligiositet, prästskandalen och den katolska kyrkan på den irländska landsbygden / The Catholic Prism : a Qualitative Study on Lived Religion, the Clerical Abuse Scandal and the Catholic Church in Rural Ireland

Juel, Evelina January 2012 (has links)
The purpose of this essay is to examine how Irish people on a rural location practice their faith in everyday life. The intention is also to find out what strategies my interviewees use to negotiate the abuse scandal and what their thoughts on the Catholic Church are. The material mainly consists of interviews with seven people part of a rural parish in Ireland. My research also entails smaller observations and conversations in the homes of the participants. The results indicate that they all consider themselves religious, however not all Catholic. All of the participants integrate their religion in everyday life. It also showed that almost all of them used a certain strategy when negotiating the knowledge of the abuse scandal leaving just one participant saying it negatively affected his faith. My results show that all of them are asking for changes within the Catholic Church when it comes to celibacy, ordaining women and same sex marriages. The results of my study are analyzed with Meredith McGuire’s theory on lived religion and Peter Berger’s theory on socialization and secularization. Religious activity is occurring in my participants’ everyday life and church-based practices such as Mass or Confessions are not as important for them as for instance prayer and humility. It also shows that my participants are socialized into Catholicism but that the Church no longer can serve as a sole legitimating power and is being severely questioned. I would also argue that today’s modern society with different religions and expressions has led to my participants questioning of the Church. In the location I have studied the results show that individuals let religion into their everyday lives and create their own version of it. With these results I would argue that my participants allow religion to influence their everyday tasks and create their own religious practice. The results suggest that my participants are indeed part of a secularization process, the objective secularization which separates the Church and state. However, religion is still alive within the subjectivity of my participants.
3

Dispositional Religiosity:Religion in the Context of Life Narratives

Degnats, Suzanne Giovanna 01 December 2013 (has links)
ABSTRACT In loosely structured narrative interviews, individuals discussed their personal religious life stories in the context of their lives, from childhood to the present. They ended up creating coherent narratives that encompassed much more than their religious traditions. The coherency of their stories was through the use of dispositions. Dispositions are the common themes, people, or other narrative schema which the narrator used consistently throughout the story, and are identified by narrative elements that repeat and anchor the narrative. Dispositions found in interviews for the Religious Life Stories Project by the GSU Religious Studies Department include familial, outlier, socioeconomic, contributive, influential, obedient, somatic, and traveler. Analysis of the dipositions in the context of these narratives illuminates the variety of ways traditional religion manifests in individuals’ lives. Furthermore, dispositions provide a theoretical basis for studying individual religion comparatively across doctrinal religious traditions.
4

Häktena Örebro och Karlstads hantering av religiös kost. : En studie i behovet av religiöst betingad kost inom kriminalvården. / How the Correctional Facilities in Örebro and Karlstad Handle the Demand for a Religiously Conditioned Diet. : A Study of the need of Religiously Conditioned Diet in the Prison and Probation Service.

Kvassman, Simon January 2019 (has links)
The purpose of this study is to examine the correctional facilities in Örebro and Karlstad, and how they handle the demand for a religiously conditioned diet. Food and drink are perhaps the most central aspects of all people’s lives. Every single person must eat, regardless of health, age and social status. Our wellbeing revolves around food, drink, and the meal preparation. As a result of that the meal throughout history has been covered with various rites in many different cultures, from the saying of prayers to the collective preparation of the food. The meal is intimately connected to religion, both from an institutional perspective but perhaps above all from a purely practical layman's perspective. This report tries to answer how the correctional facilities in Örebro and Karlstad handle the demand for a religiously conditioned diet from three different perspectives. Firstly, from the point of view of the state agency, which is examined by studying the laws and regulations that controls the handling of food in relation to religion. Secondly, from the point of view of those who are preparing the meals who have been interviewed. Thirdly, from the point of view of the inmates who have had the opportunity to answer a survey. Based on the theory of lived religion the essay concludes that the Correctional Services do follow the laws that are set by the Swedish parliament. There is provision of diversified diets which take into consideration religious requirements to an extent that is possible. Additionally, the staff that prepares and handles the food take the religious requirements seriously. The study emphasised the importance of such requirements for inmates. The highest percentage of inmates requesting a religious based diet was between 20 to 25 percent with a diet free from pork.
5

Body-centered constructivism and lived religion in photojournalism: visual analyses and a creative case study

McGinnis, Klinton Charles-Jones 01 December 2016 (has links)
The purpose of this study was to utilize the dual frameworks of Body-Centered Constructivism and Lived Religion to analyze the work of contemporary photojournalists and documentary photographers. Interviews were conducted with a targeted selection of professional and non-professional photojournalists whose experiences and work were relevant to the Body-Centered Constructivist framework. Informants were asked to comment on how physical factors including but not limited to new photographic technologies affected the use of their bodies while on assignment, their interpretation of stories, and their relationships with their subjects. Next, visual analyses of works of photojournalism were conducted using a Lived Religion framework. These works were selected based on their relevance to the research questions presented, namely how photojournalists approach the mundane in coverage of religious stories. An additional creative component operated as a case study for applying each framework to a work of visual journalism. Various media were employed based on relationships fostered between the media, the photographer’s body, and the subjects. Reflections and conclusions based on this project are included.
6

Greatest Commandment: Lived Religion in a Small Canadian Non-denominational Church

Myhill, Carol 19 November 2012 (has links)
Canada has distinct contemporary faith communities that differ from western and European counterparts. Unfortunately statistics tracking denominational allegiances give little insight into the daily intricacies of collective religious practice. The purpose of this study is to contribute towards filling a gap within scholarly research on the lived culture and experiences of contemporary religious communities within Canada. This study examines the pattern of culture-sharing within a non-denominational faith community as lived and practiced in Ottawa. Through autoethnography, this study asks why members attend and how members view the use of popular culture video clips within church. Individual and collective religious identities are constructed through observations, interviews and material artifacts gleaned through participant observation from January 2011 to December 2011. The results show that within the church, a community of practice is built around shared parenthood and spiritual journey. Members place importance on children, on providing support of all kinds for one another, and on keeping religion relevant. Reasons for attending are echoes of the patterns of culture-sharing: members enjoy the feeling of community, the support, the friendships, the play dates. Participants view popular culture video clips played within church as one aspect of an overall importance placed upon relevance. Mutuality of engagement results in members experiencing their lives as meaningful, it validates their worth through belonging, and it creates personal histories of becoming within the context of a community of practice. Future research recommendations include further study of other contemporary faith communities within Canada, with investigation into the possibility that communities of practice may be what the churched and unchurched are seeking.
7

SACRED SOCIAL SPACES: FINDING COMMUNITY AND NEGOTIATING IDENTITY FOR AMERICAN-BORN CONVERTS TO ISLAM

Soliman, Sarah A 01 January 2014 (has links)
This thesis examines the religious experiences of American-born converts to Islam. The social nature of religion has been long ignored in research on the lives of religious people. A review of research on Muslim identities reveals an emphasis on immigrants, women, and youth in the British context. However, there is little to no research on the unique constituency of converts to Islam and the importance of social aspects of faith for establishing a sustainable and transformative practice of Islam. This research closes this gap through a case study of the religious experiences of American-born converts to Islam. Through in-depth interviews with converts and community leaders, and sustained engagement with the Cincinnati Muslim community, I examine the extent to which social interaction (understood as both site and process) shapes convert identities and their understanding of religious belief and practice. My research suggests that religion not only occupies a variety of everyday lived spaces for converts, but that Islam can be understood as a way of being in the world. Since understanding of religious belief and practice is multifaceted and diverse, I explore the influence of social interaction and community on converts’ spiritual modalities. I argue that spaces not deemed officially sacred (e.g. places of worship or pilgrimage sites) are just as influential in shaping the religious identities of converts, and help converts develop a religious way of being that is self-transformative and sustainable in the American context.
8

Greatest Commandment: Lived Religion in a Small Canadian Non-denominational Church

Myhill, Carol 19 November 2012 (has links)
Canada has distinct contemporary faith communities that differ from western and European counterparts. Unfortunately statistics tracking denominational allegiances give little insight into the daily intricacies of collective religious practice. The purpose of this study is to contribute towards filling a gap within scholarly research on the lived culture and experiences of contemporary religious communities within Canada. This study examines the pattern of culture-sharing within a non-denominational faith community as lived and practiced in Ottawa. Through autoethnography, this study asks why members attend and how members view the use of popular culture video clips within church. Individual and collective religious identities are constructed through observations, interviews and material artifacts gleaned through participant observation from January 2011 to December 2011. The results show that within the church, a community of practice is built around shared parenthood and spiritual journey. Members place importance on children, on providing support of all kinds for one another, and on keeping religion relevant. Reasons for attending are echoes of the patterns of culture-sharing: members enjoy the feeling of community, the support, the friendships, the play dates. Participants view popular culture video clips played within church as one aspect of an overall importance placed upon relevance. Mutuality of engagement results in members experiencing their lives as meaningful, it validates their worth through belonging, and it creates personal histories of becoming within the context of a community of practice. Future research recommendations include further study of other contemporary faith communities within Canada, with investigation into the possibility that communities of practice may be what the churched and unchurched are seeking.
9

Sökes: ett alternativt rum där jag kan få göra individuella val : En fallstudie om varför individen väljer en antroposofisk mödra- och barnavårdcentral

Sjöberg, Johanna January 2012 (has links)
Mitt syfte med denna uppsats är att undersöka varför och på vilket sätt individer söker sig till antroposofi. Jag vill främst göra detta genom att undersöka och beskriva attityder hos individer som har valt att gå till en antroposofisk mödra- och barnavårdcentral. Individer som inte på ett enkelt sätt definierar sig som antroposofer, eller ens som associerade med den organisationen, men som trots allt ändå väljer antroposofisk mödravård. Syftet är att lyfta fram individens val, tankar och förhållningsätt till antroposofin och till mörda- och barnavårdcentralen.
10

Greatest Commandment: Lived Religion in a Small Canadian Non-denominational Church

Myhill, Carol January 2012 (has links)
Canada has distinct contemporary faith communities that differ from western and European counterparts. Unfortunately statistics tracking denominational allegiances give little insight into the daily intricacies of collective religious practice. The purpose of this study is to contribute towards filling a gap within scholarly research on the lived culture and experiences of contemporary religious communities within Canada. This study examines the pattern of culture-sharing within a non-denominational faith community as lived and practiced in Ottawa. Through autoethnography, this study asks why members attend and how members view the use of popular culture video clips within church. Individual and collective religious identities are constructed through observations, interviews and material artifacts gleaned through participant observation from January 2011 to December 2011. The results show that within the church, a community of practice is built around shared parenthood and spiritual journey. Members place importance on children, on providing support of all kinds for one another, and on keeping religion relevant. Reasons for attending are echoes of the patterns of culture-sharing: members enjoy the feeling of community, the support, the friendships, the play dates. Participants view popular culture video clips played within church as one aspect of an overall importance placed upon relevance. Mutuality of engagement results in members experiencing their lives as meaningful, it validates their worth through belonging, and it creates personal histories of becoming within the context of a community of practice. Future research recommendations include further study of other contemporary faith communities within Canada, with investigation into the possibility that communities of practice may be what the churched and unchurched are seeking.

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