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  • About
  • The Global ETD Search service is a free service for researchers to find electronic theses and dissertations. This service is provided by the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations.
    Our metadata is collected from universities around the world. If you manage a university/consortium/country archive and want to be added, details can be found on the NDLTD website.
11

The effects of speech structure and argument strength of audience attitudes and retention

Culton, Gerald Lee. January 1962 (has links)
Call number: LD2668 .T4 1962 C85
12

Attorneys in Litigation

Findley, Jessica Deborah January 2010 (has links)
Trial advocacy is an important aspect of our legal system, and is critical for ensuring a fair trial. This dissertation considers the recommended trial advocacy techniques for attorney demeanor, verbal communications, paralinguistic communications, kinesic communication, attorney-client relationships, and storytelling in light of the available science. First, each chapter reviews the trial strategies recommended by trial commentators. Next, each chapter explores scientific research relevant to the advocacy recommendations by legal commentators and identifies the limitations in their recommendations. In addition, research-based advocacy techniques are suggested for improving trial advocacy.
13

The Art of Persuasion: Self-Esteem, Message Framing, and the Persuasiveness of Prosocial Messages

He, Theresa (Huan) 24 December 2015 (has links)
Our planet currently faces an environmental crisis. Thus, understanding how to persuade people to donate their time and money to environmental organizations has become an ever-pressing concern. Prior research has shown that personality factors such as the behavioural inhibition system (BIS) and the behavioural activation system (BAS) along with promotion and prevention orientations can interact with message frame (i.e, gain- versus loss-framing) to induce regulatory or affective fit, thereby increasing the persuasiveness of the message (e.g. Higgins, 2000; Updegraff, Sherman, Luyster, & Mann, 2007). I propose and test the hypothesis that self-esteem will also interact with message frame to increase persuasion, even when BIS/BAS and promotion/prevention are controlled. I test this hypothesis in two experiments (Ns = 828 and 1614). In each study, participants completed a series of questionnaires assessing BIS/BAS, promotion/prevention, and self-esteem and then read either a gain- or loss-framed environmental message. Then participants completed a memory test concerning the message content. Finally, they completed a donation task in which they apportioned a lump sum of money to five different charities, including one environmental charity. Contrary to my hypotheses, there was no interaction between self-esteem and message frame in either study. However, participants in the loss-framed condition donated more money to the environmental charity than did participants in the gain-framed condition, and this difference was explained by participants' greater memory for the loss-framed message. Moreover, the second experiment demonstrated that participants also reported stronger intentions to behave pro-environmentally when they had donated money to the environmental charity. Thus it appears that loss-framed messages are more effective at persuading people to donate time and money to environmental causes. Due to the paucity and mixed-results of research on gain- and loss-framing in the environmental field, my research can help contribute to the few studies on this topic. The practical application of these results may prove useful to environmental charities and organizations. / Graduate / 2017-12-16 / 0451
14

Exploring the effect of narrative health information and the moderating role of systematic processing on the impact of self-affirmation

Fox, Kerry Jane January 2017 (has links)
Self-affirmation shows promise as a technique for promoting more open-minded responding to health-risk information. However, studies to date have largely ignored a prevalent type of health information: experiential or narrative information. The aims of this research programme were therefore to (1) examine whether self-affirmation would promote more open-minded responding to narrative information and (2) test individual differences in systematic processing as a potential moderator. Chapter 2, Study 1 (N = 52) found that self-affirmation encouraged less derogation and counter-arguing in response to a narrative leaflet detailing the risks of alcohol consumption. Low systematic processors reported consuming significantly less alcohol at follow-up, despite initially reporting lower risk perceptions. In Study 2 (N = 67), self-affirmation produced mixed effects on outcomes. Moderation analyses showed that those low in systematic processing reported lower personal relevance and negative affect following the message, and evidence of less engagement with the narrative (lower reported attention to the narrative and less perspective taking), when self-affirmed. In the study reported in Chapter 3 (N = 142), after viewing a narrative video outlining the risks of alcohol consumption, self-affirmed participants reported consuming significantly less alcohol at follow-up. Self-affirmed participants also engaged in more open-minded responding (e.g., evidence of more message acceptance) to the health information, which was mediated by narrative engagement. Systematic processing did not moderate any effects. In Chapter 4, Study 1 (N = 157) a graphic narrative about the benefits of exercise was no more effective in changing outcomes than a non-narrative version of the same information. In Study 2 (N =71), the few effects of self-affirmation were typically moderated by systematic processing. Chapter 5 (N = 197) examined the impact of self-affirmation on a real health campaign that uses narrative formats to present information: Dry January. Again systematic processing typically moderated the effects of self-affirmation. On balance, the research programme provides some evidence that self-affirmation can promote more open-minded responding to narrative information. However, those low in systematic processing tended to show less persuasion when self-affirmed.
15

The argument structure of fund-raising texts

Lau, Lai Lai Cubie 01 January 2001 (has links)
No description available.
16

The Importance of Class and Money - A Marxist Analysis of Jane Austen's Persuasion

Andersson, Therese January 2009 (has links)
<p>This essay analyzes how issues related to money and social class are presented in Jane Austen’s Persuasion. The method used will be a close reading as well as aspects of Marxist literary criticism, a theory that will be presented in the second chapter. Background information about the author and her time will then be given in the third chapter. In chapter four, the character of Sir Walter Elliot will be analyzed, in chapter five Elizabeth Elliot, and in chapter six William Elliot. Some of the other characters will be analyzed, more briefly, in the seventh chapter. Conclusions will then be drawn in the eighth and final chapter.</p>
17

The application of a model of social influence theory to the study of the effects of source similarity and source expertise on persuasion in an advertising setting /

Swartz, Teresa Anne. January 1981 (has links)
Thesis (Ph. D.)--Ohio State University, 1981. / Includes bibliographical references (leaves 136-142). Available online via OhioLINK's ETD Center.
18

The Importance of Class and Money - A Marxist Analysis of Jane Austen's Persuasion

Andersson, Therese January 2009 (has links)
This essay analyzes how issues related to money and social class are presented in Jane Austen’s Persuasion. The method used will be a close reading as well as aspects of Marxist literary criticism, a theory that will be presented in the second chapter. Background information about the author and her time will then be given in the third chapter. In chapter four, the character of Sir Walter Elliot will be analyzed, in chapter five Elizabeth Elliot, and in chapter six William Elliot. Some of the other characters will be analyzed, more briefly, in the seventh chapter. Conclusions will then be drawn in the eighth and final chapter.
19

Les rapports de la rhétorique et de la philosophie dans l'oeuvre de Cicéron : recherches sur les fondements philosophiques de l'art de persuader /

Michel, Alain, January 2003 (has links)
Texte remanié de: Th. doct.--Lettres--Paris-Sorbonne, 1960. / Bibliogr. p. 665-707 ; p. 747-753. Index.
20

Evaluating attitudes of obesity and their change processes among student teachers and schoolteachers on the world wide web using the elaboration likelihood model /

Hague, Anne L., January 2003 (has links) (PDF)
Thesis (Ph. D.) in Food Science and Human Nutrition--University of Maine, 2003. / Includes vita. Includes bibliographical references (leaves 127-141).

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