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  • About
  • The Global ETD Search service is a free service for researchers to find electronic theses and dissertations. This service is provided by the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations.
    Our metadata is collected from universities around the world. If you manage a university/consortium/country archive and want to be added, details can be found on the NDLTD website.
1

A Heuristic Exploration of White Lesbian Identity and Cultural Humility Through Art Therapy

Phelps, Jennifer 07 May 2019 (has links)
In this heuristic exploration, data was collected through in vivo reflections using the cultural humility model. The researcher used art making, journaling, and a process of indwelling to collect data exploring the relationship between multiple identities and cultural humility. Through this exploration, four main themes emerged. These themes were explored in a final creative synthesis art process. This research serves as a starting point for developing a culturally humble stance as an art therapy trainee. In addition, this exploration highlights the way that art making can enhance the heuristic research experience by deepening the reflection and pulling out themes not readily seen.
2

Supervision, Culture, and Relationship: Examining Supervisor Cultural Competence and the Working Alliance

Howell, Claudia Elizabeth 05 May 2016 (has links)
In the counseling profession, clinical supervision is utilized to facilitate the personal and professional development of counselors in training (Bernard and Goodyear, 2014). Within this supervisory relationship, supervisors must adhere to the 2015 ACA Code of Ethics, which describes the need for infusing cultural competence into both counseling and supervision practices. This emphasis is warranted; as the population of the United States is growing more diverse and cultural sensitivity in counseling will be needed in order to best serve clients. Both qualitative and quantitative research in various allied fields and settings suggest that supervisor cultural competence positively impacts the supervision working alliance (i.e., Ladany, Brittan-Powell and Pannu, 1997; Ancis and Marshall, 2010; Wong, Wong and Ishiyama, 2013). However, research conducted from the perspective of supervisors working in community settings is limited. This study sampled 78 community supervisors to address the dearth in the counselor education literature concerning the relationships between supervisor cultural competence and the working alliance. Results indicated an overall positively correlated relationship between supervisor multicultural competence and the working alliance. Additionally, the results suggested that supervisor cultural knowledge and supervisor cultural skills are the greatest predictors of a strong working alliance, while supervisor multicultural relationship and supervisor multicultural awareness accounted for some additional variance. The results support the trend away from a competency-based model of cultural sensitivity and attention in counseling and toward a model of cultural humility. / Ph. D.
3

A Heuristic Exploration of the Intersections of Social Justice Theory, Community Art Therapy, and Cultural Humility

Ordway, Beth 01 May 2018 (has links)
This research adopts a heuristic method of inquiry to explore the intersections of social justice theory, cultural humility, and community art therapy to strengthen both the internal awareness and art therapy practices of the researcher. Data was collected over a structured eight-week period through art-making and reflective writing. Six core themes were extrapolated from the data, which were then applied to the researcher’s experience with a community-based art therapy engagement. Through this process of investigating authentic self-reflection and deep consideration for community-based applications, the researcher illuminated personal biases, beliefs, and assumptions to better understand personal and societal implications of the adoption of a more culturally humble art therapy practice.
4

Exploring Social Worker Knowledge, Conceptualization, and Use of Cultural Humility in Hospice

Schiller, Shelby L. 01 January 2019 (has links)
This capstone project examined social workers’ knowledge, values, and beliefs as related to the concept of cultural humility to determine how hospice care professionals treat patients’ cultural preferences and traditions with respect and sensitivity at the end of life; as such practices have the ability to improve the hospice experience. Research questions addressed in the study (a) how social workers in Nevada define cultural humility in the context of hospice social work practice, (b) the values or principles hospice social workers in Nevada consider most important in providing culturally appropriate care to hospice patients, and (c) the ways hospice social workers in Nevada implemented a cultural humility stance within their practice. To obtain data for this project, connections with the local hospice care community were used to recruit interested individuals directly involved in service delivery through a convenience sampling method. Participant data was collected via a focus group with 9 participants, which was then recorded, transcribed, and analyzed. The method of analysis was thematic exploration and estimation of the prevalence of identified themes. Five major themes were identified through analyses: (a) individualized culture, (b) respect for others, (c) team-oriented approach, (d) implementation of cultural humility, (e) lack of formal training and integration of hands-on experience. Findings contribute to the generic hospice services knowledge base, working in synergy with previous research findings to help encourage future research studies on this topic.
5

Supervisee Perceptions of Cultural Rupture & Cultural Humility: Impact on the Supervisory Relationship

Jadaszewski, Stefan 25 August 2020 (has links)
No description available.
6

Counselors' Reflections on Their Experiences in Preparation to Counsel Adult Refugee Clients

Lackey, Bethany Ann 01 February 2021 (has links)
Millions of people around the world have fled their home countries in search of refuge, and there is a great likelihood they experience traumatizing events in their journeys to safety. Refugees are screened for mental health issues in the resettlement process in the United States, and there is a large body of established research regarding refugee mental health needs and strengths. However, far less is known about counseling refugees, and even less so about counselors working with the population. This dissertation study sought counselors' reflections on their experiences, both personal and professional, they feel help prepare them to see refugee clients. Four post-masters counselors participated in the video interviews. Participants were diverse (3 women, 4 ethnicities, counseling refugees from all areas of the world). Minimum criteria was having three adult refugee clients for a minimum of three sessions each. Four main themes emerged as result of analysis: 1) Trauma-informed, 2) Cultural competence and humility, 3) Counselor determination, and 4) Integration of Self. Participants specifically identified trauma-informed practices, cultural competence, and cultural humility as integral parts of necessary training for counselors to see this population. Counselors in this study found they were ill-prepared when they began seeing refugees and had to overcome obstacles to provide needed therapy. Results show a gap between what is known about refugees in academic literature and counselors' knowledge of the population which highlights the need for accessible curriculum and training on refugee issues as well as best practices for serving refugee clients. Implications for counselors, counselor educators, and future research are shared. / Doctor of Philosophy / People who have refugee status often struggle to meet basic needs upon resettlement. They have experienced potentially traumatizing events in their journeys, and their mental health needs are not often met. While a great body of research on refugee mental health exists, far less is known about counseling refugees, and even less so about counselors working with the population. This dissertation study sought counselors' reflections on their experiences, both personal and professional, they feel helped prepare them to see refugee clients. Four counselors participated in the video interviews. Minimum criteria was having three adult refugee clients for a minimum of three sessions each. Four main themes emerged as result of analysis: 1) Trauma-informed, 2) Cultural competence and humility, 3) Counselor determination, and 4) Integration of Self. Counselors in this study found they were ill-prepared when they began seeing refugees and had to overcome obstacles to provide needed therapy. Results show a gap between what is known about refugees in academic literature and counselors' knowledge of the population which highlights the need for accessible curriculum and training on refugee issues as well as best practices for serving refugee clients. Implications for counselors, counselor educators, and future research are shared.
7

Coloniality and the Science of Applied Behavior Analysis

Pritchett, Malika Naomi 05 1900 (has links)
Human life is to be universally cherished and valued. Policies about how to value lives are often developed following gross human rights violations. Some of the most horrific violations have occurred under the guise of biomedical and behavioral research. As a result, policies have been developed to protect participants. Presumably, the primary responsibility of the researcher is their protection. There are, however, potential tensions between protections and research agendas, which set the occasion for over selection of participants with vulnerabilities. This dynamic may establish competing contingencies that devalue, and potentially harm, participants. Power imbalances inherent in the researcher-participant relationship establish the researcher as the dominant knowledge seeking authority and the participant as the subservient subject. Ideally, research in applied behavior analysis is driven by a steadfast orientation toward the enhancement of human life and the amelioration of suffering. The purpose of this paper is to present an analysis of human rights trends in the Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis. The dependent measures are based on ethical principles established for the protection of participants and recommendations concerning participatory research practices in applied behavior analysis. The results indicate that in some cases, protections have been minimally reported. Furthermore, power imbalances are highly likely given the processes and outcomes reported. The trends appear to be moving in an unfavorable direction in most cases. Findings are discussed on three levels: 1) a conceptual analysis of potential contingencies that influence applied behavior analytic research, 2) considerations around coloniality, and, 3) recommendations to neutralize and diffuse power imbalances to ensure the applied spirit of the science is actualized.
8

Intersections Between Violence and Health Promotion Among Indigenous Women Living in Canada

Williams, Julie 07 May 2019 (has links)
Violence against Indigenous women is a major public health concern worldwide and Canada is no exception. Multiple forms of violence inform the broader context of violence against Indigenous women. Nurses are likely to encounter Indigenous women in a variety of settings, but evidence suggests that nurses may lack understandings of violence. This thesis explored the following question: How does extant qualitative research conducted in Canada, contribute to understanding the health and wellbeing of First Nations, Métis and Inuit (Indigenous) women who have experienced violence? During the development of this thesis, significant gaps were highlighted including underrepresentation of Inuit women in the literature, limited focus on health promotion, and lack of methodological approaches to systematic reviews that were participatory and inclusive of the community. Therefore, a secondary aim of this thesis was to privilege perspectives of Inuit women and their communities, by developing a study protocol for a collaborative and community centered approach to reviewing and assessing the extant literature. A configurative and inductive approach based on thematic synthesis was used to systematically search, retrieve, analyze and synthesize extant literature. Post-colonial feminist theory and intersectionality were used as theoretical lenses to emphasize intersections between multiple forms of violence and locate the problem within the broader context of colonization and oppression. Sixteen studies were included in this review, fifteen qualitative and one mixed methods study. Four themes with subthemes emerged based on analysis and synthesis of findings in the included studies: 1) ruptured connections between family and home, 2) that emptiness… my spirit being removed, 3) seeking help and feeling unheard, and 4) a core no one can touch. These themes represent interconnected pathways that influenced health among Indigenous women, and have implications for healthy public policy, clinical practice, and nursing education.
9

An interpretive qualitative study of baccalaureate nursing students following an eight-day international cultural experience in Tanzania

Ferranto, Mary Lou Gemma 07 May 2013 (has links)
No description available.
10

Examining Cultural Humility and Intersectionality in Mental Health Treatment

Herrera-Spinelli, Sandra Y. 01 January 2019 (has links)
Cultural awareness is an ethical standard in the social work profession and, as the diversity in the United States continues to grow, it is a social work practice problem when cultural awareness is not implemented in mental health settings. The National Association of Social Workers revised the cultural awareness standards to include cultural humility and intersectionality as practice indicators. The purpose of this action research study was to examine how clinical social workers demonstrated cultural humility and intersectionality in mental health settings. Person-centered theory guided this study and a total of 17 clinical social workers in New Mexico participated in in-depth interviews to give examples of clinical practice behaviors that demonstrated cultural humility and intersectionality. Thematic analysis was used to identify common themes, which included (a) genuine interest in the client's culture, (b) therapist congruence, (c) unconditional positive regard, and (d) empathic understanding. The implications of this study for social work practice and social change are that findings could contribute to improved cultural awareness in mental health settings and decrease mental health disparities among minorities. Recommendations include creating continuing education, mentoring minority college students on their career path in mental health, and developing a mental health business model that integrates cultural awareness.

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