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  • About
  • The Global ETD Search service is a free service for researchers to find electronic theses and dissertations. This service is provided by the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations.
    Our metadata is collected from universities around the world. If you manage a university/consortium/country archive and want to be added, details can be found on the NDLTD website.
1

Lay misperceptions of the relationship between men’s benevolent and hostile sexism

Yeung, Amy January 2012 (has links)
Although there is a reliably positive association between hostile (HS) and benevolent sexism (BS), lay perceptions of this association have not been directly tested. I predicted that people perceive an illusory negative association between men’s HS and BS attitudes because lay theories expect men to have univalent attitudes toward women. In Study 1, I manipulated the target’s gender and responses on a subscale of the Ambivalent Sexism Inventory (high HS, low HS, high BS, or low BS). The low BS male target (compared to high BS male target) was judged to be higher on HS, less supportive of female professionals, less good of father and husband, and more likely to perpetrate domestic violence. Ratings of the low BS male target were as equally negative as those of the high HS male target. In Study 2, low BS male targets were judged to be low in hostility towards women only if they explicitly stated that their low BS was motivated by egalitarian values, otherwise men’s low BS was assumed to indicate misogyny. Implications of the misconception of BS in men and future directions are discussed.
2

Lay misperceptions of the relationship between men’s benevolent and hostile sexism

Yeung, Amy January 2012 (has links)
Although there is a reliably positive association between hostile (HS) and benevolent sexism (BS), lay perceptions of this association have not been directly tested. I predicted that people perceive an illusory negative association between men’s HS and BS attitudes because lay theories expect men to have univalent attitudes toward women. In Study 1, I manipulated the target’s gender and responses on a subscale of the Ambivalent Sexism Inventory (high HS, low HS, high BS, or low BS). The low BS male target (compared to high BS male target) was judged to be higher on HS, less supportive of female professionals, less good of father and husband, and more likely to perpetrate domestic violence. Ratings of the low BS male target were as equally negative as those of the high HS male target. In Study 2, low BS male targets were judged to be low in hostility towards women only if they explicitly stated that their low BS was motivated by egalitarian values, otherwise men’s low BS was assumed to indicate misogyny. Implications of the misconception of BS in men and future directions are discussed.
3

Applying the SCM and BIAS Map Models to Theories of Sexual Harassment

Ohse, Dawn 01 August 2014 (has links)
Current theories of sexual harassment do not account for all instances of sexual harassment (e.g., not man enough harassment) or third party reactions to sexual harassment such as manager or coworker perceptions of sexual harassment or interactions with the target of sexual harassment. Perhaps taking a step back from specific sexual harassment theories and looking at more general theories of discriminatory behavior can provide some guidance toward a more overarching theory of sexual harassment. The current study applied the Stereotype Content Model (SCM; Fiske, Cuddy, Glick & Xu, 2002) and Behaviors from Intergroup Affect and Stereotypes (BIAS) Map model (Cuddy, Fiske & Glick, 2007) to women who are sexually harassed and the resulting third party behavioral reactions, including perception of sexual harassment. This study attempted to establish the initial relationships between the evaluation of the female target with regard to her competition and status to the other variables in the model: stereotyping (i.e., how observers think about the target - warmth and competence), prejudice (i.e., how observers feel about the target - pity, admiration, envy, contempt) and behavioral reactions (how observers act toward the target - active facilitation, passive facilitation, active harm, passive harm). Higher status targets were perceived as more competent than lower status targets. Competition did not have an effect on perceptions of the target's warmth. Competition and status did not predict emotions and behavioral reactions as hypothesized; however many other relationships predicted by the model between stereotypes, emotions, behavioral reactions and perceptions of sexual harassment were found here, although not hypothesized in the current study. Targets who were perceived as warm and competent elicited more facilitation and less harm than those who were perceived as less warm and less competent. Targets that were admired and pitied elicited more facilitation whereas targets that were contempted or envied elicited more harm. Additionally, warmth, competence, admiration, and pity were positively related to perceptions of sexual harassment, whereas envy and contempt were negatively related to perceptions of sexual harassment. Targets who were perceived as having been sexually harassed elicited more facilitation and less harm. Thus, the model is still useful in understanding how stereotypes (warmth and competence) and emotions (envy, admiration, pity, and contempt) relate to third party behavioral reactions to sexual harassment and perceptions of sexual harassment. Given that competition and status did not predict stereotypes, emotions, behavioral reactions and perceptions of sexual harassment as expected, it may be that these effects are more a function of individual factors such as gender and hostile sexism, rather than out-group evaluation (competition and status). In the current study men and those higher in hostile sexism were less likely than women and those lower in hostile sexism to perceive that the target had been sexually harassed, to perceive the target as warm and competent, to feel admiration or pity for the target, or to engage in facilitation behaviors. Additionally, men and those higher in hostile sexism were more likely than women and those lower in hostile sexism to feel contempt or envy toward the target and to engage in harm behaviors. Future research should examine other methods of manipulating perceptions of targets' competitiveness and status other than occupational characteristics to examine the impact of these out-group characteristics on stereotypes, emotions and behavioral reactions in the context of sexual harassment.
4

Glass Cliff In Relation To Hostile And Benevolent Sexism

Ak Kurt, Deniz 01 September 2011 (has links) (PDF)
The aim of the study was to investigate the relationship between the glass cliff phenomenon and two forms of sexism: hostile sexism (HS) and benevolent sexism (BS). Glass cliff refers to the tendency to endorse a woman candidate for a normally desirable, high-status position at the time of downfall or when things are not going well. A questionnaire package was first administered to a working people sample (N = 328) with diverse occupational backgrounds. Based on the analyses and findings, to be able to eliminate the potential confounding effect of the order of the scales in the package, the study was repeated on a student sample (N = 147). Finally, analyses were repeated after the data from both samples were combined. Results showed no evidence for 1) the presence of glass cliff and 2) the presence of a relationship between glass cliff and two forms of sexism. The results from both samples were discussed, presenting some plausible explanations for the findings. Limitations of the study and suggestions for future research are also presented.
5

Atuação feminina em profissões consideradas masculinas: O caso da Informática

Santana, Marleny da Penha Oliveira 22 April 2009 (has links)
Made available in DSpace on 2016-07-27T14:21:49Z (GMT). No. of bitstreams: 1 Marleny da Penha Oliveira Santana.pdf: 509292 bytes, checksum: 1c5ab09f818c1f0713edfe249299ecf7 (MD5) Previous issue date: 2009-04-22 / This study aims at investigating prejudice against women through the men's opinions regarding to feminine insertion in a profession considered masculine: information technology. Specifically, we planned to answer to the following question: how do men evaluate women that act in professions of masculine prevalence? Our sample was constituted by 253 men. Of these, 54.2% were information technology students and 45.8% were emplyees in two information technology companies, one federal and one municipal. The mean age was 31.4 years (DP=10.7 years), with minimum of 18 and maximum 58 year-old. Two thirds of participants (66.6%) were married or lived with somebody. The participants answered a questionnaire formed by open questions and Likert-type scales. Taken together, the results indicate that the adhesion to the hostile sexism and the benevolent sexism co-exist among the participants, however, a tendency exists to higher levels of hostile sexism among the students. Those results are discussed from the perspective of the Theory of the Realistic Conflicts (Sherif, 1967). / Este estudo tem como objetivo principal investigar o preconceito contra as mulheres por meio das opiniões dos homens a respeito da inserção feminina em uma profissão considerada masculina: a tecnologia da informação. Especificamente, planejamos responder à seguinte questão: como os homens avaliam mulheres que atuam em profissões de predomínio masculino? Nossa amostra foi constituída por 253 homens, dos quais 54,2% eram estudantes da área de informática e 45,8% atuavam em duas empresas de tecnologia da informação, uma federal e outra municipal. A idade média foi de 31,4 anos (DP=10,7 anos), com idade mínima de 18 e máxima de 58 anos. Dois terços dos participantes (66,6%) eram casados ou moravam junto com alguém. Os participantes responderam a um questionário formado por questões abertas e em formato Likert. Tomados em conjunto, os resultados indicam que tanto a adesão ao sexismo hostil quanto ao benevolente co-existem entre os participantes, no entanto, existe uma tendência ao sexismo hostil ser mais alta entre os estudantes. Esses resultados são discutidos à luz da Teoria dos Conflitos Realistas (Sherif, 1967).
6

The Development of Intergroup Bias in Children to Ambivalent Sexism in Adults: A Study of the Role of Self-esteem

Wrend, Noel E. Thomas 01 January 2007 (has links)
Gender differences play an important role in the diversity that exists in our world today. Evan as infants, our young minds are able to grasp that there are large differences in the roles and expectations for males and females and that these differences contribute to the variety of experiences that we encounter in our interactions with the two genders. As we grown from children into adults, it is clear that the biased opinions we form regarding the opposite sex in childhood are too simplistic in their ideologies, and during the time that we mature into young adults, our opinions mature as well. Although there has been much research into the development of attitudes from childhood into adulthood, the role that self-esteem may play in the process has been somewhat neglected. This thesis explored the nature of self-esteem and tested its salience with regard to intergroup gender bias in children and ambivalent sexism in adults. In the child sample (n=20), intergroup gender bias was found to be correlated positively with global self-worth. In the adult sample (n=218), elevated levels of global self-worth were correlated with hostile sexism in females and with benevolent sexism in males. Surprisingly few types of specific self-esteem (self-perceived peer social competence, behavioral conduct, physical appearance, and athletic competence) were found to correlate with intergroup gender bias in children and ambivalent sexism in adults.
7

Was That Sexist?: Open-Mindedness Predicts Interpretation of Benevolent Sexism in Ambiguous Scenarios

Tanner, Meagan C. January 2019 (has links)
No description available.
8

Leading the Way: Capturing the Lived Experiences of African American Female Superintendents in the State of Ohio

Bailey-Walker, Tonya M. 19 April 2018 (has links)
No description available.
9

Social Attitudes Towards Sexism, Self-Objectification, Fear of Crime, and Trustworthiness-Based Face Ratings

Hughes, Tiana K. 03 August 2023 (has links)
No description available.

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