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  • About
  • The Global ETD Search service is a free service for researchers to find electronic theses and dissertations. This service is provided by the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations.
    Our metadata is collected from universities around the world. If you manage a university/consortium/country archive and want to be added, details can be found on the NDLTD website.
1

Rhygin's vortex art as medicine for race/gender fixations in Jamaica and the U.S. /

Lawrence, Cecile Ann. January 2009 (has links)
Thesis (Ph. D.)-- State University of New York at Binghamton, Philosophy, Interpretation and Culture Graduate Program, 2009.
2

Lay misperceptions of the relationship between men’s benevolent and hostile sexism

Yeung, Amy January 2012 (has links)
Although there is a reliably positive association between hostile (HS) and benevolent sexism (BS), lay perceptions of this association have not been directly tested. I predicted that people perceive an illusory negative association between men’s HS and BS attitudes because lay theories expect men to have univalent attitudes toward women. In Study 1, I manipulated the target’s gender and responses on a subscale of the Ambivalent Sexism Inventory (high HS, low HS, high BS, or low BS). The low BS male target (compared to high BS male target) was judged to be higher on HS, less supportive of female professionals, less good of father and husband, and more likely to perpetrate domestic violence. Ratings of the low BS male target were as equally negative as those of the high HS male target. In Study 2, low BS male targets were judged to be low in hostility towards women only if they explicitly stated that their low BS was motivated by egalitarian values, otherwise men’s low BS was assumed to indicate misogyny. Implications of the misconception of BS in men and future directions are discussed.
3

Lay misperceptions of the relationship between men’s benevolent and hostile sexism

Yeung, Amy January 2012 (has links)
Although there is a reliably positive association between hostile (HS) and benevolent sexism (BS), lay perceptions of this association have not been directly tested. I predicted that people perceive an illusory negative association between men’s HS and BS attitudes because lay theories expect men to have univalent attitudes toward women. In Study 1, I manipulated the target’s gender and responses on a subscale of the Ambivalent Sexism Inventory (high HS, low HS, high BS, or low BS). The low BS male target (compared to high BS male target) was judged to be higher on HS, less supportive of female professionals, less good of father and husband, and more likely to perpetrate domestic violence. Ratings of the low BS male target were as equally negative as those of the high HS male target. In Study 2, low BS male targets were judged to be low in hostility towards women only if they explicitly stated that their low BS was motivated by egalitarian values, otherwise men’s low BS was assumed to indicate misogyny. Implications of the misconception of BS in men and future directions are discussed.
4

Teachers' perceptions of gender bias in the classroom

Kosmerl, Katherine M. January 2001 (has links) (PDF)
Thesis--PlanB (M.S.)--University of Wisconsin--Stout, 2001. / Includes bibliographical references.
5

Sexist vs non sexist education : its implications for the education of South African Indian females

Ponnusamy, Marimutu January 1995 (has links)
Submitted to the Faculty of Education in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Education in the Department of Sociology of Education at the University of Zululand, 1995. / The purpose of this study was to measure the extent to which sexism and/or non-sexism is practised in Indian Schools, controlled by the HOD's Department of Education and Culture and then consider its implications for the education of the South African Indian females. Three methods of research-survey, questionnaires and interviews - were used to gather data from a population of 414 persons, comprising parents, educators and students The researcher intended to establish how these people perceive the influence and impact of sexism/non-sexism on the education of the Indian girls. The data were analysed and interpreted by the 'Triangulation Technique' to enhance the accuracy and the authenticity of the findings. The literature review revealed that sexism in education is universal. Most societies under-invest in their females' education; and although there has recently been equal access to education there has not been equal opportunities to both the sexes. Little information on sexism in Indian education was available. In the historical review of the education of the Indian females, three distinct periods of governmental control were identified - Natal Colonial Government (1860-1910), Union Government (1910-1961) and Republican Government since 1961. In each period the parents and the government had discriminated against the Indian girls and under-invested in their education. Theoretical perspectives on sexism and the practices of sexism and/or non-sexism obtaining elsewhere In the world were presented. This exposition focused on the construction of gender, sex-role stereotyping how the school perpetuates these gender differences, and how education is planned and dispensed to empower the males and disempower the females. Comparisons with the Indian situation in South Africa revealed a close resemblance in the way sexism works. This research demonstrated a confirmation of the sexist practices. The main findings revealed that : the HOD's Department of Education and Culture is sexist; the schools do not overtly practise sexism but the status quo reveals sexism; the differentiated curricula are designed to covertly empower the males over the females in the workplace and the wider society; the Indian parents and the government still under-invest in the girls' education; although the Indian parents now value the education of their daughters, they could still sacrifice it in favour of their sons; sexual harassment occurs at schools and the school population is not fully aware of the institutionalised sexism in Indian education. Emerging from these findings are the following recommendations: integrate schools on non-sexist lines desist from sex-role sterotyping and allocating work according to sex at schools conscientize and transform the school population adopt open curricula at schools empower women teachers use non-sexist language and literature at schools deal effectively with teenage pregnancy encourage women to engage in wage labour include parents in restructuring education.
6

Demographic Variables as Moderators Between Benevolent Sexism and Relationship Satisfaction

Campbell, Dawna Jeanette 01 January 2017 (has links)
Romantic relationship satisfaction relates to better overall health, and identifying factors that affect relationship satisfaction could lead to better understanding of romantic relationships. This study examined the correlation between benevolent sexism, a subtle form of sexism resembling chivalry and relationship satisfaction; gender, age, ethnicity, religious beliefs, education, and length of time were also considered as moderators. The ambivalent sexism theory, which posits that sexism is ambivalent and ranges from hostile to benevolent sexism was the theoretical framework guiding this study. Previous research indicated benevolent sexism may predict relationship satisfaction. However, there remained an important gap in the literature; the demographic variables above had not been considered as moderators in those analyses. Thus, the purpose of this non-experimental study using data collected from a U.S. sample of adults who had been in romantic relationships for at least 1 year was to determine if such links existed. Correlation and regression analyses revealed that benevolent sexism, measured by the Ambivalent Sexism Inventory did not predict relationship satisfaction, measured by the Relationship Assessment Scale, and none of the demographic variables served as moderators. Results were trending toward significance though, suggesting that benevolent sexism might influence women's relationship satisfaction. Further research using longitudinal, mixed-method studies of dyads is recommended to gain a clearer understanding of this phenomenon. Findings would make important contributions to existing literature and enhance social change by providing professionals and individuals with awareness of how benevolent sexist attitudes may affect relationship satisfaction.
7

Är sexismen verkligen välvillig? : Kvinnor och mäns fyra tematiska uppfattningar av välvillig sexism

Uzbekova Kandel, Sabrina January 2020 (has links)
Sexism är en form av diskriminering av en individ baserat på individens kön. Teorin om ambivalent sexism beskriver de två beståndsdelarna fientlig och välvillig sexism. Tidigare kvantitativa metoder och designer har begränsat individers möjligheter att utförligt beskriva attityder och uppfattningar av välvillig sexism. Syftet med denna studie var att belysa individers attityd och uppfattningar av välvillig sexistiskt tankesätt. Totalt 10 deltagare intervjuades om deras uppfattningar och inställning till 2 profiler varav en porträtterar välvillig sexism. Genom en kvalitativ tematisk analys med hermeneutisk ansats utformades 4 teman och 1 underteman. Resultatet visade att välvilligt sexistiskt tankesätt uppfattades som kontrollerande, emotionellt instabilt, dysfunktionellt och med gömda avsikter. Studiens resultat stödjer inte tidigare forskning när det kommer till positiva attityder och förhållningsätt till välvillig sexism. Däremot kompletterar resultatet tidigare kvantitativ forskning med nya data om individers negativa syn på välvillig sexism. Framtida studier inom ämnet skulle kunna utformas med mer fokus på enskilda grupper med andra sexuella läggningar.
8

Las trayectorias femeninas y feministas hacia lo público en Colombia (1970-2000) inclusión sin representación? /

Wills O., María Emma. Dietz, Henry A., January 2004 (has links) (PDF)
Thesis (Ph. D.)--University of Texas at Austin, 2004. / Supervisor: Henry Dietz. Vita. Includes bibliographical references. Also available from UMI.
9

“Perhaps the most important lesson I learned was how closely connected the different forms of inequality are.” : A thematic analysis of the Everyday Sexism Project

Foley, Lauren January 2023 (has links)
This thesis set out to explore how, through a radical feminist lens and using the theory of a continuum of violence by Dr. Liz Kelly, the Everyday Sexism Project community thinks about the issue of everyday sexism, how they view everyday sexism in relation to larger, more severe acts of sexist violence, and whether they see potential for change and/or eradication of the former. The analysis discovered that there is strong cognitive dissonance (mental discomfort that results from holding two conflicting beliefs, values, or attitudes) in how the community speaks about the impact of everyday sexism has had on them. It also found that the frequency of acts, and not the severity, should be more of a focal point when discussing everyday sexism and its relation to larger acts of sexist violence. It also found that, generally speaking, the community is not hopeful for change but does desire it and posit ways to achieve it.
10

'A long weekend' : a case study of student teachers' experiences of a secondary PGCE course

Lloyd, Michele January 1999 (has links)
No description available.

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