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  • About
  • The Global ETD Search service is a free service for researchers to find electronic theses and dissertations. This service is provided by the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations.
    Our metadata is collected from universities around the world. If you manage a university/consortium/country archive and want to be added, details can be found on the NDLTD website.
1

The efficiency and alignment of planning and environmental impact assessment (EIA) authorisation processes in the Mpumalanga Province / Carli Steenkamp

Steenkamp, Carli Stephani January 2009 (has links)
The legal reform process in South Africa has led to increasingly complex legislative requirements for new developments in the form of various authorization processes. Currently different organs of state, at different spheres of government exercise a range of powers and functions in respect of the approval of development applications. These authorisations typically relate to planning, water management, heritage resources, environmental management, air quality, etc. In order to improve the efficiency and alignment of authorisation processes there is a serious need to gain a better understanding of the interaction between the different authorisation processes as well as the challenges experienced. This research presents the results of a critical analysis of planning and environmental impact assessment (EIA) authorisation processes in the Mpumalanga Province and examines how authorisation processes are implemented and aligned, how efficient the processes are, why process inefficiencies occur and how the efficiency of processes can be improved. The outcome of the research suggests that there are three main success factors for efficiency, namely the legislative framework that provides for administrative and environmental justice, co-operative governance that provides the basis for good communication, and information and competence that injects expertise into the authorisation process. The so-called 'efficiency triangle' is conceptualised, which clearly illustrates the interaction between these success factors. / Thesis (M. Environmental Management)--North-West University, Potchefstroom Campus, 2010.
2

The efficiency and alignment of planning and environmental impact assessment (EIA) authorisation processes in the Mpumalanga Province / Carli Steenkamp

Steenkamp, Carli Stephani January 2009 (has links)
The legal reform process in South Africa has led to increasingly complex legislative requirements for new developments in the form of various authorization processes. Currently different organs of state, at different spheres of government exercise a range of powers and functions in respect of the approval of development applications. These authorisations typically relate to planning, water management, heritage resources, environmental management, air quality, etc. In order to improve the efficiency and alignment of authorisation processes there is a serious need to gain a better understanding of the interaction between the different authorisation processes as well as the challenges experienced. This research presents the results of a critical analysis of planning and environmental impact assessment (EIA) authorisation processes in the Mpumalanga Province and examines how authorisation processes are implemented and aligned, how efficient the processes are, why process inefficiencies occur and how the efficiency of processes can be improved. The outcome of the research suggests that there are three main success factors for efficiency, namely the legislative framework that provides for administrative and environmental justice, co-operative governance that provides the basis for good communication, and information and competence that injects expertise into the authorisation process. The so-called 'efficiency triangle' is conceptualised, which clearly illustrates the interaction between these success factors. / Thesis (M. Environmental Management)--North-West University, Potchefstroom Campus, 2010.
3

The formal specification of the Tees Confidentiality Model

Howitt, Anthony January 2008 (has links)
This thesis reports an investigation into authorisation models, as used in identity and access management. It proposes new versions of an authorisation model, the Tees Confidentiality Model (TCM), and presents formal specifications in B, and verifications and implementations of the key concepts using Spec Explorer, Spec# and LinQ. After introducing the concepts of authorisation and formal models, a formal methods specification in B of Role Based Access Control (RBAC) is presented. The concepts in RBAC have heavily influenced authorisation over the last two decades, and most of the research has been with their continued development. A complete re-working of the ANSI RBAC Standard is developed in B, which highlights errors and deficiencies in the ANSI Standard and confirms that B is a suitable method for the specification of access control. A formal specification of the TCM in B is then developed. The TCM supports authorisation by multiple concepts, with no extra emphasis given to Role (as in RBAC). The conceptual framework of Reference Model and Functional Specification used in the ANSI RBAC Standard is used to structure the TCM formal model. Several improvements to the original TCM are present in the formal specification, notably a simplified treatment of collections. This new variation is called TCM2, to distinguish it from the original model. Following this, a further B formal specification of a TCM reduced to its essential fundamental components (referred to as TCM3) was produced. Spec Explorer was used to animate this specification, and as a step towards implementation An implementation of TCM3 using LinQ and SQL is then presented, and the original motivating healthcare scenario is used as an illustration. Finally, classes to implement the versions of the TCM models developed in the thesis are designed and implemented. These classes enable the TCM to be implemented in any authorisation scenario. Throughout the thesis, model explorations, animations, and implementations are illustrated by SQL, C# and Spec# code fragments. These illustrate the correspondence of the B specification to the model design and implementation, and the effectiveness of using formal specification to provide robust code.
4

Agent-based one-shot authorisation scheme in a commercial extranet environment

Au, Wai Ki Richard January 2005 (has links)
The enormous growth of the Internet and the World Wide Web has provided the opportunity for an enterprise to extend its boundaries in the global business environment. While commercial functions can be shared among a variety of strategic allies - including business partners and customers, extranets appear to be the cost-effective solution to providing global connectivity for different user groups. Because extranets allow third-party users into corporate networks, they need to be extremely secure and external access needs to be highly controllable. Access control and authorisation mechanisms must be in place to regulate user access to information/resources in a manner that is consistent with the current set of policies and practices both at intra-organisational and cross-organisational levels. In the business-to-customer (B2C) e-commerce setting, a service provider faces a wide spectrum of new customers, who may not have pre-existing relationships established. Thus the authorisation problem is particularly complex. In this thesis, a new authorisation scheme is proposed to facilitate the service provider to establish trust with potential customers, grant access privileges to legitimate users and enforce access control in a diversified commercial environment. Four modules with a number of innovative components and mechanisms suitable for distributed authorisation on extranets are developed: * One-shot Authorisation Module - One-shot authorisation token is designed as a flexible and secure credential for access control enforcement in client/server systems; * Token-Based Trust Establishment Module - Trust token is proposed for server-centric trust establishment in virtual enterprise environment. * User-Centric Anonymous Authorisation Module - One-task authorisation key and anonymous attribute certificate are developed for anonymous authorisation in a multi-organisational setting; * Agent-Based Privilege Negotiation Module - Privilege negotiation agents are proposed to provide dynamic authorisation services with secure client agent environment for hosting these agents on user's platform
5

Co-operative environmental governance: alignment of environmental authorisations in the province of KwaZulu/Natal

Jikijela, Sgananda Malibongwe Lwazi January 2013 (has links)
The main legislation governing environmental authorisation in South Africa is the National Environmental Management Act, 107 of 1998 (NEMA). This legislation is administered by the environmental affairs departments at national, provincial and local spheres of government. Besides NEMA, there are other pieces of legislation which govern environmental authorisation and, in some instances, are administered by other organs of state. They, like NEMA, require submission of reports to authorities for decision-making. This may result in cumbersome and duplication of processes; which in turn, may delay the initiation of development activities. NEMA provides for co-operative governance, coordination of activities and alignment of processes to counter the above problems. Section 24L states that activities regulated in another law may be regarded as sufficient for authorisation in terms of NEMA, and vice versa. Furthermore, section 24K provides for consultation and coordination of legislative requirements to avoid duplication. Flowing from these provisions is that competent authorities may exercise their powers by issuing separate or integrated authorisations. All these provisions aim to promote smooth and seamless interactions between all key role-players involved in authorisation processes. However, there are widespread concerns amongst key role-players and the public at large about the lack of application and/or implementation of the foregoing legislative provisions. This study investigates these concerns through a literature review, case study analysis and administration of a questionnaire. The results show that the fruits of these provisions (i.e. coordinated activities, aligned processes and/or integrated authorisations) in the province of KwaZulu-Natal have yet to be realised. This study recommends, therefore, that clear guidance be provided to provinces on how to implement the legislative provisions described above. / Thesis (M. Environmental Management)--North-West University, Potchefstroom Campus, 2013.
6

Co-operative environmental governance: alignment of environmental authorisations in the province of KwaZulu/Natal

Jikijela, Sgananda Malibongwe Lwazi January 2013 (has links)
The main legislation governing environmental authorisation in South Africa is the National Environmental Management Act, 107 of 1998 (NEMA). This legislation is administered by the environmental affairs departments at national, provincial and local spheres of government. Besides NEMA, there are other pieces of legislation which govern environmental authorisation and, in some instances, are administered by other organs of state. They, like NEMA, require submission of reports to authorities for decision-making. This may result in cumbersome and duplication of processes; which in turn, may delay the initiation of development activities. NEMA provides for co-operative governance, coordination of activities and alignment of processes to counter the above problems. Section 24L states that activities regulated in another law may be regarded as sufficient for authorisation in terms of NEMA, and vice versa. Furthermore, section 24K provides for consultation and coordination of legislative requirements to avoid duplication. Flowing from these provisions is that competent authorities may exercise their powers by issuing separate or integrated authorisations. All these provisions aim to promote smooth and seamless interactions between all key role-players involved in authorisation processes. However, there are widespread concerns amongst key role-players and the public at large about the lack of application and/or implementation of the foregoing legislative provisions. This study investigates these concerns through a literature review, case study analysis and administration of a questionnaire. The results show that the fruits of these provisions (i.e. coordinated activities, aligned processes and/or integrated authorisations) in the province of KwaZulu-Natal have yet to be realised. This study recommends, therefore, that clear guidance be provided to provinces on how to implement the legislative provisions described above. / Thesis (M. Environmental Management)--North-West University, Potchefstroom Campus, 2013.
7

Environmental impact assessment follow–up in South Africa : critical analysis of predictions and compliance for the Mooi River Mall case study / Ilse Jordaan

Jordaan, Ilse January 2010 (has links)
Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) is recognised worldwide as a tool for identifying the potential adverse effects of a proposed development on the environment. Very little attention has been given to determining the actual environmental effects resulting from a development. The need for EIA follow–up (i.e. monitoring, auditing, evaluation, management and communication) was identified and would form the building blocks within the EIA process. Follow–up provides information about the consequences of an activity and presents opportunities to implement adequate mitigation measures. EIA follow–up is not developed to its full potential even though the need for it is acknowledged and supported in legislation, scientific journals and scientific books. EIA follow–up necessitates feedback in the EIA process to ensure lessons learnt and outcomes from past experiences can be applied in future actions. Follow–up is only a legal requirement if conditions are specified in the environmental authorisation (EA). Of particular concern to follow–up is the accuracy of prediction and secondly, the level of compliance to conditions set out in the authorization and management plans. This study will focus primarily on critically analysing predictions and compliance from the construction phase of a high profile mega shopping mall project, namely the Mooi River Mall (MRM), with an analysis to gauge the actual effect and contribution of the EIA process to decision making and implementation practices. Multiple data sources were used to determine the accuracy of predictions and legal compliance level of the Mooi River Mall. The Mooi River Mall's accuracy of predictions (66%) and legal compliance (83%) suggest that some of the impacts were unavoidable; that mitigation measures were either not implemented or identified or that EIA follow–up served its purpose in the form of implementing effective auditing programmes to monitor legal compliance. / Thesis (M.Sc (Environmental Science))--North-West University, Potchefstroom Campus, 2011.
8

Environmental impact assessment follow–up in South Africa : critical analysis of predictions and compliance for the Mooi River Mall case study / Ilse Jordaan

Jordaan, Ilse January 2010 (has links)
Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) is recognised worldwide as a tool for identifying the potential adverse effects of a proposed development on the environment. Very little attention has been given to determining the actual environmental effects resulting from a development. The need for EIA follow–up (i.e. monitoring, auditing, evaluation, management and communication) was identified and would form the building blocks within the EIA process. Follow–up provides information about the consequences of an activity and presents opportunities to implement adequate mitigation measures. EIA follow–up is not developed to its full potential even though the need for it is acknowledged and supported in legislation, scientific journals and scientific books. EIA follow–up necessitates feedback in the EIA process to ensure lessons learnt and outcomes from past experiences can be applied in future actions. Follow–up is only a legal requirement if conditions are specified in the environmental authorisation (EA). Of particular concern to follow–up is the accuracy of prediction and secondly, the level of compliance to conditions set out in the authorization and management plans. This study will focus primarily on critically analysing predictions and compliance from the construction phase of a high profile mega shopping mall project, namely the Mooi River Mall (MRM), with an analysis to gauge the actual effect and contribution of the EIA process to decision making and implementation practices. Multiple data sources were used to determine the accuracy of predictions and legal compliance level of the Mooi River Mall. The Mooi River Mall's accuracy of predictions (66%) and legal compliance (83%) suggest that some of the impacts were unavoidable; that mitigation measures were either not implemented or identified or that EIA follow–up served its purpose in the form of implementing effective auditing programmes to monitor legal compliance. / Thesis (M.Sc (Environmental Science))--North-West University, Potchefstroom Campus, 2011.
9

Registrace léčiv v České republice / Marketing authorisation in the Czech Republik

Švestka, Miroslav January 2014 (has links)
Marketing authorisation in the Czech Republic The purpose of the thesis is to provide an overview of essential principles of a process of medicinal products' marketing authorisation in the Czech Republic. Every medicinal product produced on a large-scale must be registered by responsible authority before launching on the market, this process guarantees its effectiveness and safety. Even though the topic is a subject of quickly evolving legislation, in the Czech Republic has not been elaborated any coherent monograph on the issue yet. The diploma thesis is composed of seven chapters, starting with the overview of the historical legislation of medicinal products' marketing authorisation and ending with today's legislation affected by European Union legislation. The second chapter is dealing with the history of the marketing authorisation of medicinal products, which has its beginnings in 1920s, such dating argues that this is not a new field of a legislation. Following a brief outline of the history the third chapter of the diploma thesis explains today's legislation and gives an overview of European legislation and jurisdiction of Court of Justice of the European Union that have important impact on the Czech legislation. In the fourth chapter the thesis focuses on State Institute for Drug Control...
10

Critical evaluation of methods for estimation of increase in systemic drug exposure for renally impaired patients

Svensson, Robin January 2013 (has links)
Introduction: The effect of renal impairment (RI) on systemic exposure is assessed in phase I with RI studies and/or in phase III with population pharmacokinetic analysis. Regulatory review has indicated that the estimated effect of RI from the two methods may differ. Aim: To map the estimated effect of RI on systemic exposure based on phase I and III data, to investigate if the estimated effect based on the two data sources differ and to investigate causes to this potential discrepancy. Methods: Marketing authorisation applications (MAA) were scrutinised with focus on impact of RI on systemic exposure estimated based on phase I and III data. In addition, a simulation-estimation study was performed to explore causes to discrepancies. Phase I and III data were simulated and analysed with non-compartmental analysis (NCA) and population analysis. The phase III data were simulated under several alternative conditions thought to be potential sources for discrepancies,  such as uncertainty in creatinine clearance (CLCR) measurements and varying number of subjects. Results: Six examples were found in MAAs in which a discrepancy was observed, where phase III tended to estimate a lower effect of RI compared with phase I. In the simulation-estimation study, the NCA of phase I data over-predicted the effect of RI on systemic exposure, while the population analysis of phase III data estimated the effect of RI without bias. Uncertainty in CLCR measurement in the phase III data resulted in under-prediction of the effect of RI on systemic exposure. Conclusions: A discrepancy in the estimated effect of RI on systemic exposure between phase I and III was observed in existing MAAs. The NCA of phase I RI study and uncertain CLCR measurements were identified as possible reasons to the discrepancy.

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