• Refine Query
  • Source
  • Publication year
  • to
  • Language
  • 18
  • 9
  • 1
  • 1
  • 1
  • 1
  • 1
  • 1
  • 1
  • Tagged with
  • 39
  • 39
  • 15
  • 15
  • 11
  • 11
  • 9
  • 8
  • 8
  • 6
  • 6
  • 5
  • 5
  • 5
  • 5
  • About
  • The Global ETD Search service is a free service for researchers to find electronic theses and dissertations. This service is provided by the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations.
    Our metadata is collected from universities around the world. If you manage a university/consortium/country archive and want to be added, details can be found on the NDLTD website.
1

Cosmetic surgery media, marketing and advertising requires more regulation

Nelson, Katelyn Christine 29 November 2010 (has links)
The marketing, advertising and mediation of cosmetic surgery in the United States has become a controversial issue. The debate began with the normalization of unrealistic beauty images due to excessive exposure to cosmetic surgery in the media and consumer self-diagnosis. Surgeons use aggressive marketing tactics for preventative procedures and prey on insecurities. Moreover, the proliferation of cosmetic surgery in the media in conjunction with misleading advertising has created an environment where consumers have false and unrealistic expectations and perceptions of cosmetic surgery. This article discusses the history of cosmetic surgery, marketing and advertising tactics as well as mediated theory to understand the ethical issues involved in elective surgery. The goal of this paper is to suggest regulation and protection for vulnerable audiences. / text
2

Outcome assessment in plastic surgery : a study of patients' health related quality of life before and after cosmetic surgery

Klassen, Anne Frances January 1997 (has links)
No description available.
3

Stigma, Surgery and Social Identity: Attitudes towards Cosmetic and Sexual Reassignment Surgeries

Mayeux, Cheryl 15 May 2009 (has links)
This thesis uses a combination of vignettes and interviews to explore social approval of cosmetic and sexual reassignment surgeries as a means of studying sex and gender in contemporary society. It draws from poststructuralist, queer, symbolic interactionist and intersectionality theories. This study found that social approval was higher for normative surgeries than for non-normative surgeries. The main themes that emerged in regard to social approval were respondents‘ religious beliefs, their social distance from a person undergoing surgery, their concerns with possible risks or complications, and their views on an individual‘s right to control their own body. Underlying the vast majority of the responses was an essentialist view of sex that influenced how participants‘ viewed the various surgeries.
4

Perceptions of Cosmetic Alteration in Different Sized Attractive Women.

White, Deborah Suzanne 03 May 2003 (has links)
Two experimental phases examined the characteristics impacting the physical attractiveness stereotype and a potential stereotype shift. From reading a description of a hypothetical target, Phase 1 of this study revealed that participants considered an overweight attractive woman significantly more likely to help a friend in need and significantly more likely to become a friend than an underweight attractive woman. These findings provide understanding of how particular stereotypes may provide social benefits. In Phase 2, knowledge of the woman's plans for liposuction, which was disclosed in a second description of the target, dramatically lowered the participants' evaluations of her physical attractiveness, willingness to help a friend in need, and likelihood as a potential friend. The women's ratings of the target's willingness to help a friend dropped significantly more than the men's ratings. These results indicate that evaluations of physically attractive women may decline if they choose to unnaturally alter their appearance.
5

What do you think of others who pursue cosmetic surgery? influences associated with perceptions of cosmetic surgery

Vergara, Angela 04 1900 (has links)
In the current climate in which it seems like popular media determines normality, it is not surprising to find that reality television, especially programs geared towards elective cosmetic surgery, are correlated with the decision making processes associated with actually pursuing cosmetic surgery. Research suggests that attitudes towards cosmetic surgery have changed dramatically due to the public's exposure to reality makeover shows; these shows have increased the popularity of such procedures and have highlighted and implied that cosmetic surgery is associated with little pain and risk. In this study, I sought to determine if attitudes toward cosmetic surgery vary as a function of ethnicity and gender, as well as examine the influence of the media on openness to pursuing cosmetic surgery. Examining how others view those who pursue elective cosmetic surgery and the variables associated with those who obtain cosmetic surgery will shed light on the processes associated with the decision to pursue the procedures. / B.S. / Bachelors / Sciences / Psychology
6

The Effects of Viewing Sexually Explicit Materials on Men's Body Image Satisfaction, Interest in Pursuing Cosmetic Surgery, and Body Change Behaviors

Schuster, Elizabeth 09 1900 (has links)
This study examined the effects of viewing sexually explicit media on men's body image, body change behaviors, and esteem in a randomized experimental study. The purpose was to determine if a cause and effect relationship exists between viewing sexually explicit media and body image dissatisfaction in men. Participants were randomized to one of four conditions. They were asked to view a short media clip and then answer a series of questionnaires assessing their current body change strategies (e.g., pathogenic weight control practices), interest in risky body behaviors (e.g., cosmetic surgery), esteem (i.e., genital, sexual, and self-esteem), and overall body image satisfaction. It was hypothesized that men exposed to the sexually explicit media condition would evidence more dissatisfaction with their bodies, utilize more body change strategies, and have more interest in risky body change behaviors. It was also hypothesized that men exposed to the sexually explicit condition would evidence poorer self-esteem, sexual esteem, and genital esteem relative to participants in the other conditions. The hypotheses were not supported. There were no significant differences among any of the conditions, including a more specific analysis between the control and sexually explicit conditions. As this differs from findings of similar studies with female participants, it is important for future studies to further examine this topic and to identify protective factors that may exist for men who view sexually explicit materials. / Ph.D. / Doctorate / Psychology / Sciences / Psychology; Clinical Psychology
7

Authenticity and its Contemporary Challenges : On Techniques of Staging Bodies

Bork-Petersen, Franziska January 2013 (has links)
In this thesis I investigate what ‘authenticity’ means in a contemporary popular context and how it is used in the staging of bodies. Furthermore, I analyse works of dance and fashion from the past fifteen years with a focus on their strategies of challenging the notion of ‘bodily authenticity’.   When ‘an authentic body’ is sought by participants or demanded by judges and ‘experts’ on popular makeover and casting TV shows such as The Swan (Fox 2004) or Germany’s Next Topmodel (Pro 7 2006-present) this refers to the physical visualisation of what is perceived/presented as the participants ‘inner self’. I scrutinise the staging techniques and the codes of appearance that bodies have to comply with in order to be deemed ‘authentic’ on the shows. To define them and place them in the history of the idea of ‘bodily authenticity’, I complement my study with an outline of how ‘authenticity’ was understood in the Enlightenment and what techniques were used to stage the body when the concept gained currency, for instance in the writings of Rousseau. My analysis makes clear that 'bodily authenticity' on the two TV shows is achieved by strictly following gender-normative codes of beauty and by a depiction of 'working hard'. But various techniques also mask the hard work, for example by showing a participant ‘having fun’ performing it.   Contemporary works of dance and fashion challenge the problematic implications in the notion of ‘bodily authenticity’. I analyse three strategies of undermining the ‘authentic’ ideal in a total of seven pieces. These strategies are hyperbole which exaggerates the beauty code implicit in ‘authentic appearance’; multiplicity which undermines ‘authenticity’s’ essentialism and estrangement which denies the notion of individual authorship. In conclusion, I place the staging strategies used in my examples in a wider cultural context and highlight potential problems inherent in their critiques. / <p>Thesis is done in ’co-tutelle’ with Freie Universität Berlin. </p>
8

Regulating Healthy Gender: Surgical Body Modification among Transgender and Cisgender Consumers

Windsor, Elroi J. 15 April 2011 (has links)
Few bodies consistently portray natural or unaltered forms. Instead, humans inhabit bodies imbued with sociocultural meanings about what is attractive, appropriate, functional, and presentable. As such, embodiment is always gendered. The social, extra-corporeal body is a central locus for expressing gender. Surgical body modifications represent inherently gendered technologies of the body. But psychomedical institutions subject people who seek gender-crossing surgeries to increased surveillance, managing and regulating cross-gender embodiment as disorderly. Using mixed research methods, this research systematically compared transgender and cisgender (non-transgender) people’s experiences before, during, and after surgical body modification. I conducted a content analysis of 445 threads on a message board for an online cisgender surgery community, an analysis of 15 international protocols for transgender-specific surgeries, and 40 in-depth interviews with cisgender and transgender people who had surgery. The content analysis of the online community revealed similar themes among cisgender and transgender surgery users. However, detailed protocols existed only for transgender consumers of surgery. Interview findings showed that transgender and cisgender people reported similar presurgical feelings toward their bodies, similar cosmetic and psychological motivations for surgery, and similar benefits of surgery. For both cisgender and transgender people, surgery enhanced the inner self through improving the outer gendered body. Despite these similar embodied experiences, having a cisgender gender status determined respondents’ abilities to pursue surgery autonomously and with institutional support. Ultimately, this research highlights inequalities that result from gender status and manifest in psychomedical institutions by identifying the psychosocial impacts of provider/consumer or doctor/patient interactions, relating gendered embodiment to regulatory systems of authority, and illuminating policy implications for clinical practice and legal classifications of sex and gender.
9

Teenage girls online message board talk about cosmetic surgery : constructions and social actions

Quaale, Rebecca Erin 16 August 2011
Previous research on cosmetic surgery and teenage girls is limited and fails to provide information regarding how teenage girls construct these procedures. A social constructionist approach informed by a discursive psychology methodology was used to study how teenage girls and message board respondents construct cosmetic surgery through the language they use and the social actions performed through their talk. I analyzed questions posted by teenage girls between the ages of 13 to 19 on online message boards, as well as responses to these questions posted by other message board users. Social actions identified in the teenage girls talk included: advice and information seeking, approval seeking, and justification of cosmetic surgery. Social actions identified in the respondents talk included: provision of advice and information, warning, approval, disapproval, criticism and judgement, reassurance, empathy, encouragement, and support. In general, teenage girls constructed cosmetic surgery as a way for them to feel better about themselves, as a way for them to feel better about the body part they were seeking surgery for, and as a way for them to fit in and be accepted by others. The results of this study are discussed in relation to the existing research on teenage girls and cosmetic surgery, Daviss (1995) feminist perspective on cosmetic surgery, Fredrickson and Robertss (1997) objectification theory, and embodiment. Implications for teenage girls, parents of teenage girls, physicians, and psychologists are also discussed, and recommendations for future research are suggested.
10

Teenage girls online message board talk about cosmetic surgery : constructions and social actions

Quaale, Rebecca Erin 16 August 2011 (has links)
Previous research on cosmetic surgery and teenage girls is limited and fails to provide information regarding how teenage girls construct these procedures. A social constructionist approach informed by a discursive psychology methodology was used to study how teenage girls and message board respondents construct cosmetic surgery through the language they use and the social actions performed through their talk. I analyzed questions posted by teenage girls between the ages of 13 to 19 on online message boards, as well as responses to these questions posted by other message board users. Social actions identified in the teenage girls talk included: advice and information seeking, approval seeking, and justification of cosmetic surgery. Social actions identified in the respondents talk included: provision of advice and information, warning, approval, disapproval, criticism and judgement, reassurance, empathy, encouragement, and support. In general, teenage girls constructed cosmetic surgery as a way for them to feel better about themselves, as a way for them to feel better about the body part they were seeking surgery for, and as a way for them to fit in and be accepted by others. The results of this study are discussed in relation to the existing research on teenage girls and cosmetic surgery, Daviss (1995) feminist perspective on cosmetic surgery, Fredrickson and Robertss (1997) objectification theory, and embodiment. Implications for teenage girls, parents of teenage girls, physicians, and psychologists are also discussed, and recommendations for future research are suggested.

Page generated in 0.074 seconds