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  • About
  • The Global ETD Search service is a free service for researchers to find electronic theses and dissertations. This service is provided by the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations.
    Our metadata is collected from universities around the world. If you manage a university/consortium/country archive and want to be added, details can be found on the NDLTD website.
1

The Comics Other: Charting the Correspondence Between Comics and Difference

Deman, Jonathon January 2010 (has links)
My research demonstrates how Othering practices affect the cultural status of the comics form. Comics frequently rely upon Othering practices such as stereotype when representing minority characters. This tendency contributes to the low cultural status of comics throughout the better part of the last century. In recent years, however, comics artists have cultivated revisioning techniques that challenge the use of Othering practices in comics. These efforts represent an important step in the push toward what is now known as the comics-as-literature movement, which Scott McCloud believes will allow the next generation of comics readers and artists to accept the idea that “comics can yield a body of work worthy of study and meaningfully represent the life, times and world-view of its author” (Reinventing 10). Even as Othering practices in comics create negative perceptions, these same practices, ironically, provide comics artists with the necessary mechanisms to undermine or revise these negative perceptions and to move comics into the literary arena. The primary mechanism that I focus on in this project is the denotation/connotation relationship. In “Rhetoric of the Image,” Roland Barthes -- speaking about advertising images -- suggests that “the denoted image naturalizes the symbolic message, it innocents the semantic artifice of connotation” (“Rhetoric” 45). Building on Barthes’ work, I demonstrate how the comics image uses the denotative component in visual representations of minorities to naturalize symbolic messages (connotations) that project inferiority. This is how comics create and perpetuate Otherness. At the same time, by interrogating the denotation/connotation relationship, contemporary comics artists have been able to undermine this naturalization process and expose the misconceptions that are inherent within representations of the Other in comics. When comics commonly adopt Othering practices, they create what Charles Hatfield refers to as “encrusted connotations” (4), where the reader’s experience of a comics work is deeply affected by the social perceptions that surround comics in general. When the treatment of minorities in comics is based upon outdated stereotypes, for example, readers may assume that comics are a popular art form without literary aspirations, and the readers then treat these comics accordingly. Conversely, when comics artists challenge the encrusted connotations of the form, they undermine these connotations and open the comics readers’ eyes to the possibility that comics can indeed yield a body of work worthy of study. As I demonstrate, this revisioning work of contemporary comics artists is an important component of the comics-as-literature movement. In order to prove this, my work isolates three distinct forms of Othering that comics speak to in a prominent way. By studying the manner in which comics represent women, racial minorities and geeks, I develop the pattern by which Othering practices contribute to the cultural status of comics art. Each chapter isolates touchstone texts with regard to minority representation (Wonder Woman as gender representation, Happy Hooligan and Luke Cage as racial representation, Clark Kent as geek representation, etc.) in order to establish the formation of encrusted connotations that can then be seen across the medium as a whole. I then show how some of the most prominent and critically acclaimed comics literature of the past twenty years (Maus, Jimmy Corrigan, Persepolis, etc.) enters into a self-reflexive dialogue with these encrusted connotations in order to move beyond them and to help transition the form toward a higher cultural status.
2

The Comics Other: Charting the Correspondence Between Comics and Difference

Deman, Jonathon January 2010 (has links)
My research demonstrates how Othering practices affect the cultural status of the comics form. Comics frequently rely upon Othering practices such as stereotype when representing minority characters. This tendency contributes to the low cultural status of comics throughout the better part of the last century. In recent years, however, comics artists have cultivated revisioning techniques that challenge the use of Othering practices in comics. These efforts represent an important step in the push toward what is now known as the comics-as-literature movement, which Scott McCloud believes will allow the next generation of comics readers and artists to accept the idea that “comics can yield a body of work worthy of study and meaningfully represent the life, times and world-view of its author” (Reinventing 10). Even as Othering practices in comics create negative perceptions, these same practices, ironically, provide comics artists with the necessary mechanisms to undermine or revise these negative perceptions and to move comics into the literary arena. The primary mechanism that I focus on in this project is the denotation/connotation relationship. In “Rhetoric of the Image,” Roland Barthes -- speaking about advertising images -- suggests that “the denoted image naturalizes the symbolic message, it innocents the semantic artifice of connotation” (“Rhetoric” 45). Building on Barthes’ work, I demonstrate how the comics image uses the denotative component in visual representations of minorities to naturalize symbolic messages (connotations) that project inferiority. This is how comics create and perpetuate Otherness. At the same time, by interrogating the denotation/connotation relationship, contemporary comics artists have been able to undermine this naturalization process and expose the misconceptions that are inherent within representations of the Other in comics. When comics commonly adopt Othering practices, they create what Charles Hatfield refers to as “encrusted connotations” (4), where the reader’s experience of a comics work is deeply affected by the social perceptions that surround comics in general. When the treatment of minorities in comics is based upon outdated stereotypes, for example, readers may assume that comics are a popular art form without literary aspirations, and the readers then treat these comics accordingly. Conversely, when comics artists challenge the encrusted connotations of the form, they undermine these connotations and open the comics readers’ eyes to the possibility that comics can indeed yield a body of work worthy of study. As I demonstrate, this revisioning work of contemporary comics artists is an important component of the comics-as-literature movement. In order to prove this, my work isolates three distinct forms of Othering that comics speak to in a prominent way. By studying the manner in which comics represent women, racial minorities and geeks, I develop the pattern by which Othering practices contribute to the cultural status of comics art. Each chapter isolates touchstone texts with regard to minority representation (Wonder Woman as gender representation, Happy Hooligan and Luke Cage as racial representation, Clark Kent as geek representation, etc.) in order to establish the formation of encrusted connotations that can then be seen across the medium as a whole. I then show how some of the most prominent and critically acclaimed comics literature of the past twenty years (Maus, Jimmy Corrigan, Persepolis, etc.) enters into a self-reflexive dialogue with these encrusted connotations in order to move beyond them and to help transition the form toward a higher cultural status.
3

Novice Teachers' Stories Represented As a Graphic Narrative

Deardorff, Philip 05 1900 (has links)
The issue of alternative certification teacher training has greatly affected art education over three decades. As a result of training through alternative certification, many art educators enter the profession unprepared and unable to cope with the realities of teaching. This study attempts to understand and represent the experiences and struggles of four alternatively certified art teachers, including myself. By reading these stories, others within the education community can empathize with and provide support for struggling novice teachers. This creative thesis uses a graphic novel format to represent participants' stories. By combining text and imagery, the graphic novel format provides different meanings, interpretations, and insights into the teachers' lives. This medium offered a unique and rich perspective on the stories of what it is like being an alternatively certified art teacher.
4

Hypermasculinity and the hero in comic book fiction : this is it

Connell, Daniel James January 2011 (has links)
This thesis examines occurrences of hypermasculinity in examples from the genre of comic book fiction, utilizing textual evidence to suggest the current collection has re-iterated the more negative hypermasculine components of their source material: comic books. In doing so, the thesis compares the present novels with the creative element of the PhD submission – This Is It – a novel which serves as a critique of the prevalence of hypermasculinity in heroic figures within comic book fiction. By analyzing the sociological reasons behind hypermasculinity, and its subsequent effects, this thesis aims to make apparent the danger inherent with the continued association of hypermasculinity and hero figures in a new medium such as comic book fiction. It will also argue that the development of such a form divergent from comic books allows scope for a deconstruction of the hypermasculine comic book hero.
5

Tre bibliotekariers uppfattningar om serier

Carlsson, Sandra, Dungert, Anna-Sara January 2011 (has links)
This bachelor´s thesis wants to look closer at librarians´ experiences of comics, manga and graphic novels. In order to bring these experiences forward qualitative interviews and the method of phenomenography was used. The material was then examend againstna theory of previous research, revealing that the problems librarians in Sweden face with these media are largely the same as the problems faced by librarians in other parts of the world. It also became clear that the participating librarians held a positive attitude to the presence of comics, manga and graphic novles in their libraries.
6

Le Petit Prince as a Graphic Novel: Images and Dual Address in Intersemiotic Translation

Twiss, Rob January 2016 (has links)
One of the most interesting aspects of Le Petit Prince by Antoine de Saint-Exupéry (1999[1946]) is its dual address. The illustrated narrative is at once a charming story for children and an allegory inviting adults to consider philosophical questions. In the graphic-novel adaptation of the book by Joann Sfar (2008), this allegory is obscured:; the abstract, philosophical ideas recede to the background while the material details of the story become more prominent. But this recession of the allegory does not mean that the adaptation turns its back on adult readers completely. The graphic novel creates a web of intertextual references, which, among other things, amplify the suggestion in the source text that the protagonist is Antoine de Saint-Exupéry himself. It thus displaces the adult interest from allegory to autobiography and the mechanism of adult address from allegory to intertextuality, restricting its adult audience. For those adult readers who remain addressed by the graphic novel, however, the text identifies itself explicitly as a translation, which has consequences for we should think about the “voice” of the translator. Un des aspects les plus intéressants du livre Le Petit Prince d’Antoine de Saint-Exupéry (1999 [1946]) tient au fait que le récit illustré est une histoire charmante pour les enfants en même temps qu’il invite les adultes à réfléchir à des questions philosophiques. Dans l’adaptation du récit en bande dessinée par Joann Sfar (2008), les éléments abstraits du livre s’estompent derrière les détails concrets de l’histoire. Cet effacement de l’allégorie ne signifie pourtant pas que la bande dessinée tourne le dos aux adultes : elle crée un réseau intertextuel qui renforce l’impression donnée par le texte source que le véritable protagoniste est Antoine de Saint-Exupéry. Ainsi, l’intérêt pour les questions philosophiques se reporte sur l’autobiographie et, passant de l’allégorie à l’intertextualité, la bande dessinée sollicite alors moins les adultes. Cependant, pour les adultes auquelles la bande dessinée s’addresse toujours, le texte s’identifie explicitement comme une traduction, ce qui implique une réévaluation du concept de la “voix” du traducteur.
7

I Didn't Grieve Wrong: Using the Graphic Novel For Personal Healing and Public Awareness

Mitchell, Holly 01 January 2018 (has links)
This paper discusses how the author created a comic as a way to explore their personal suffering and the suffering of those around them throughout schooling. It defines the inspirations, both personal and technical for how the comic was produced and how it will expand to a graphic novel after college.
8

Diss and the graphic novel : an international and South Afrcian exploration

Vaandrager, Cornelis 19 August 2011 (has links)
The first part of this submission is a graphic novel entitled “Diss”. The novel is set in South African in the near future, and is based on Dante’s “Inferno”. The work also draws on various ancient mythologies and works of fiction. Essentially, this graphic novel is a reflection on contemporary South African society, as the reader travels with the main character, Dirk, through the rooms of a club in the South African capital, Pretoria. The club contains the nine circles of hell, and leads Dirk to discover aspects of himself that he has suppressed, such as his mother’s brutal murder. He meets his three guardians from ancient Egyptian mythology, who are also the keepers of the hallway. He further has to confront the three aspects of the Queen of hell, based on the three archetypal aspects of woman, who tempt him into letting go of a memory. At the climax, he is confronted with the queen herself, who, craving the taste of Dirk’s pain, tries to remove the memory from him by force. Throughout “Diss” Dirk’s best friend Gugu travels with his, and acts as his moral guide in the club. The second section is entitled “The graphic novel: an international and South African exploration.” The research essay explores the definitions and background of the graphic novel, and looks at how the genre can uniquely explore aspects of time and space, myth and intertext and hybridity and cultural production. To illustrate these aspects the essay explores definitive works in the genre, namely “Maus” by Art Spiegelman, “The Sandman” series by Neil Gaiman, and “Persepolis” by Marjane Satrapi. The essay further looks at the history of African comics, and, more specifically, the graphic novel publication industry in South Africa. Lastly, the essay explores the possibilities of the graphic novel within the multimodal classroom, particularly in how the genre can be used in promoting literacy. / Dissertation (MA)--University of Pretoria, 2011. / Afrikaans / unrestricted
9

Entre a convenção e o deslocamento: uma análise do realismo em Watchmen / Between convention and displacement: an analysis of Watchmen\'s realism

Rômulo Bezerra 05 April 2016 (has links)
Esta dissertação tem como objetivo realizar uma aproximação entre dois campos distintos: a Literatura e as Histórias em Quadrinhos. Especificamente, pretende-se aqui analisar como Watchmen constroi e organiza sua narrativa partindo de um pressuposto realista. Nesse sentido, esta dissertação realiza uma aproximação entre dois gêneros: o romance literário e o romance gráfico (graphic novel). A ascensão de ambos os gêneros já aponta paralelos entre os campos. Após essa exposição, é feita a análise propriamente dita, que compreende duas partes. A primeira se constitui do levantamento das estruturas visuais de Watchmen (balões, formato dos quadrinhos, estilo do desenho) que se organizam em um jogo entre convenção mimética e deslocamento. A segunda parte da análise tem como recorte os capítulos II e XI do romance gráfico e se debruça sobre o tratamento dispensado ao super-heroi; o que significa, no contexto de Watchmen, construir um super-heroi realista. / This thesis aims to approximate two distinctive fields: Literature and Comics. It intends to analyse how Watchmen constructs and organizes its narrative from a realistic assumption. In order to do so, this thesis approximate two genres: the literary novel and the graphic novel. The rise of both genres indicates similarities between the two fields. After that, the two-part analysis is presented. The first part consists of listing and interpreting Watchmens visual structure (speech bubbles, panel format, drawing style) and how they reveal a play between mimetic convention and displacement from it. The second part focuses on Watchmens chapters II and XI and analyses how the super-heroi character is constructed; what does it mean to make a realistic super-hero in Watchmens context.
10

Novas leituras, histórias de outrora: transposição de obras clássicas para o gênero graphic novel

Silva, Camila Santin Calçada 21 June 2018 (has links)
Submitted by JÚLIO HEBER SILVA (julioheber@yahoo.com.br) on 2018-07-10T12:11:26Z No. of bitstreams: 2 Dissertação - Camila Santin Calçada Silva - 2018.pdf: 16713737 bytes, checksum: 29ba6c90635d7281096c48b3e54fe4cc (MD5) license_rdf: 0 bytes, checksum: d41d8cd98f00b204e9800998ecf8427e (MD5) / Approved for entry into archive by Luciana Ferreira (lucgeral@gmail.com) on 2018-07-11T10:37:23Z (GMT) No. of bitstreams: 2 Dissertação - Camila Santin Calçada Silva - 2018.pdf: 16713737 bytes, checksum: 29ba6c90635d7281096c48b3e54fe4cc (MD5) license_rdf: 0 bytes, checksum: d41d8cd98f00b204e9800998ecf8427e (MD5) / Made available in DSpace on 2018-07-11T10:37:23Z (GMT). No. of bitstreams: 2 Dissertação - Camila Santin Calçada Silva - 2018.pdf: 16713737 bytes, checksum: 29ba6c90635d7281096c48b3e54fe4cc (MD5) license_rdf: 0 bytes, checksum: d41d8cd98f00b204e9800998ecf8427e (MD5) Previous issue date: 2018-06-21 / Con base en la importancia de la literatura para la construcción del ser humano pleno y la importancia de los cómics para la formación del lector, en el presente estudio se abordó el análisis de obras denominadas clásicas transpuestas para el género graphic novel, término acuñado por el cuadrinista y la importancia de los cómics para la formación del lector, los estudiosos de las artes gráficas, Will Eisner. Así se seleccionaron cinco obras del Programa Nacional Biblioteca Escolar PNBE entre los años 2006 a 2014, período en que obras en este género fueron incluidas en los edictos de compra gubernamental. En la constitución del presente corpus, elegimos el análisis de las transposiciones de O Guarani (2010) por Luiz Gê e Ivan Jaf, Frankenstein (2012) transpuesta por Taísa Borges, Leonardinho - memorias del primer malandro brasileño (2011) de Walter Pax y Vicente Castro, Don Quijote (2005) de Caco Galhardo. Nos interesó comprender el recorrido y la consolidación de las transposiciones y su importancia en la constitución del alumno-lector. En concreto, cuáles los procesos y caminos fueron tomados por los cuadrinistas al transponer obras literarias al género cuadrinizado. La presente investigación se basó en el análisis de pensadores de las áreas de las Artes Gráficas, así como pensadores ligados a los Estudios Literarios tales como Eisner (1989); McCloud (2005); Barbieri (2017); Vergueiro (2007), Ramos (2014); Hutcheon (2013); Andraus (2006); Paiva (2012); Cosson (2014); (Cagnin (1975), Santaella (2012), Bahía (2012); entre otros . / Tendo como base a importância da literatura para a construção do ser humano pleno e a importância dos quadrinhos para a formação do leitor, a presente pesquisa debruçou-se sobre a análise de obras ditas clássicas transpostas para o gênero graphic novel, termo cunhado pelo quadrinista e estudioso das artes gráficas, Will Eisner. Assim foram selecionadas cinco obras do Programa Nacional Biblioteca Escolar PNBE entre os anos de 2006 a 2014, período em que obras neste gênero foram inclusas nos editais de compra governamental. Na constituição do presente corpus, elegemos a análise das transposições de O Guarani (2010) por Luiz Gê e Ivan Jaf, Frankenstein (2012) transposta por Taísa Borges, Leonardinho – memórias do primeiro malandro brasileiro (2011) de Walter Pax e Vicente Castro, Dom Quixote (2005) por Caco Galhardo. Interessou-nos compreender o percurso e consolidação das transposições e sua importância na constituição do aluno-leitor. Em específico, quais os processos e caminhos foram tomados pelos quadrinistas ao transporem obras literárias para o gênero quadrinizado. A presente pesquisa se pautou na análise de pensadores das áreas das Artes Gráficas, bem como pensadores ligados aos Estudos Literários tais como Eisner (1989); McCloud (2005); Barbieri (2017); Vergueiro (2007), Ramos (2014); Hutcheon (2013); Andraus (2006); Paiva (2012); Cosson (2014); Cagnin (1975), Santaella (2012); Bahia (2012); entre outros.

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