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  • About
  • The Global ETD Search service is a free service for researchers to find electronic theses and dissertations. This service is provided by the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations.
    Our metadata is collected from universities around the world. If you manage a university/consortium/country archive and want to be added, details can be found on the NDLTD website.
1

Collective brand strategy, entrepreneurship, and regional growth : The role of a protected designation of origin (PDO)

Borg, Erik, Gratzer, Karl January 2013 (has links)
This research aims to interconnect entrepreneurship theories with brand theories. The study analyzes how this can be accomplished in the context of smaller agricultural firms, considering how intellectual property rights can be used strategically in entrepreneurial activities, ultimately creating regional growth. A firm has several options to protect its brands. Producers of similar products within a limited geographical area can protect the shared designated origin. Use of a collective brand, such as Champagne and Roquefort in France or Parmeggiano Reggiano in Italy, has been studied as a strategy to protect products from a given region. In the case analyzed here, a particular Austrian collective brand – Gailtaler Almkäse – was safeguarded within a protected designation of origin (PDO), providing producers a safe haven from which to enhance their collective brand in competitive markets. The PDO registration of the brand represents a central entrepreneurial strategy for manufacturers. To the region where the brands originate, the PDO has become a specific aspect of entrepreneurship that leads regional development.
2

Convergence, endogenous growth, and development in the regions of Europe

Simms, Jonathan Oliver January 1995 (has links)
No description available.
3

An application of multiregional extended input-output modelling in a developing country : the case of Taiwan

Li, Bin January 1999 (has links)
No description available.
4

Utlokalisering av statliga myndigheter : Ett sätt att påverka den regionala tillväxten?

Paulsson, Annika January 2016 (has links)
In 2017, a report on how to increase economic growth and development in Sweden was handed over to the Minister of rural affairs Sven-Erik Bucht (s). One of the suggestions was to relocate 10 000 governmental jobs to regions in need of government presence. The purpose of this thesis is to establish the effects that a relocation of a state agency, as an political instrument, can have on the regional growth. The thesis objective is to answer the following questions: What positive and negative effects does agency relocation produce? and Is there a connection between a state agency’s relocation and regional economic growth? To answer these questions a model was constructed and filled with the effect findings and then related to the presumptions to economic growth. The formed hypothesis that long-term positive effects will increase growth was proven right, although it is probably a weak correlation. Conclusively, relocation of state agencies is a debatable instrument. The result of this study is that it is very expensive and costly in the short term but can be a success and prosperous in the long run for the organization, the employees and its surrounding environment.
5

Cooperation for Regional Growth and Development in the Värmland Region 1998-2008 : - With a Triple Helix Approach

Säll, Line January 2008 (has links)
<p>In spite of Sweden´s lack of formal regions, the country is evolving towards regional administrations. The regional level are to a growing extent viewed as important bases for economic growth and development. The concept of the triple helix implies that interaction between the public sector, the industry and universities is a source to economic and social development. Research has though implied that the interaction between the triple helix actors could be problematic from a multi-level governance perspective. It has been shown that since the institutional setting is horizontal and vertical fragmented, cooperation between different institutions and actors becomes difficult. In year 2005-2006 the Värmland region was one of fourteen regions in twelve countries that was included in a OECD project, that was a response to the multiplicity of initiatives across the OECD countries concerning regional development. In the report that evolved from the project actors in Värmland was recommended to improve the cooperation concerning regional development in the county. This thesis investigates the cooperation between the triple helix actors for regional growth and development in the Värmland region 1998-2008. My research questions are: Is there evidence of a lack of cooperation between the university, the public sector and the industrial actors in Värmland? And if this is the case, could these problems be related to the fragmentation of the institutional setting? The thesis is a qualitative case study, conducted through elite-interviews and document analysis. My findings implies that the cooperation between the triple helix actors in Värmland has developed dramatically the last decade. From a strive for coordination that was pervaded by institutional fragmentation to an increased closeness and mutual involvement that has come to over-bridge the institutional fragmentation on the regional level. Although, it seems like the vertical fragmentation between the regional and national level, which could impede growth and development in the region, to a great degree remains.</p>
6

Polycentric development and transport network in China's megaregions

Song, Ge 08 June 2015 (has links)
China’s mega-regions, in addition to cities and metropolitan areas, have become the engines for economic development, and the target areas for regional and national policies. Reflecting upon China’s current path of regional urbanization, the proposed research examines a fundamental issue for China’s megaregional development: the impact of transport network development on the spatial pattern of China’s megaregions. Using the multiple national Censuses (1982, 1990, 2000, 2010) and the transport network GIS data in the corresponding years, this research 1) constructs measures of megaregional spatial patterns, 2) assesses the spatial trajectory of megaregional growth based on the differentiated growth rates of metropolitan cities, 3) computes indicators of megaregional transport network connectivity and accessibility, 4) examines the impacts of transportation infrastructure on megaregional growth trajectory. This research helps understand the spatial structure of China’s megaregions with newly constructed quantitative measures of polycentric spatial development, as well as the intra-megaregion and inter-megaregion variation of transport network in China. It also clarifies the link between transport infrastructure and megaregional spatial structure in China’s unique context by providing quantitative evaluation of the implications of transport investment for the spatial pattern in Chinese megaregions. Finally it enriches the megaregional solutions to China’s vision of economic, social and environmental sustainability.
7

Firm dynamics in job growth - employment growth determinants

Zikos, Dimitrios 16 April 2008
Understanding the determinants of employment growth is important in light of the concentration of population and employment in urban centres. As economic activity concentrates, smaller urban centres, and rural areas and towns find themselves at a growing disadvantage. Yet not all small urban or rural towns share the same experience. Moreover, not all urban centres grow significantly. It is thus of academic interest to discover more precisely what the employment growth determinants are.<p>Another aspect of employment growth is the particular source of employment change. Employment growth is not single-dimensional, but it has four components (growth from firm births and business expansions; and decreases from firm deaths and business declines), each of which may have unique determinants. Thus, in investigating the determinants of employment change, it is important to recognize the businesses life cycle and test whether the key influences vary over that life cycle. <p>This study empirically estimates the determinants of employment growth and assesses their role and relative importance in a communitys job growth. The major determinants include industrial composition, human capital, spatial variables and policy variables. The study is carried out at two levels: sub-provincial and provincial and covers the years 1983-1999. Two econometric methods of estimation are applied, random effects and fixed effects. <p>An important finding is that there are significant differences among the four components of employment change. This implies that when we simply examine overall employment growth we are masking very different effects that the determinants of employment change have among the four components of job growth. At the community level industrial diversification assists the growth of expanding firms and boosts employment due to the establishment of new businesses. On the other side, communities that have high industrial concentration experience lower employment losses from declining and exiting firms. Regions with a higher share of population that has received some post secondary education have, ceteris paribus, higher job growth rates. Another finding is that the farther away a community is situated from a large Census Metropolitan Area, the less employment growth it has. These results offer significant refinements to undifferentiated employment change findings.
8

Firm dynamics in job growth - employment growth determinants

Zikos, Dimitrios 16 April 2008 (has links)
Understanding the determinants of employment growth is important in light of the concentration of population and employment in urban centres. As economic activity concentrates, smaller urban centres, and rural areas and towns find themselves at a growing disadvantage. Yet not all small urban or rural towns share the same experience. Moreover, not all urban centres grow significantly. It is thus of academic interest to discover more precisely what the employment growth determinants are.<p>Another aspect of employment growth is the particular source of employment change. Employment growth is not single-dimensional, but it has four components (growth from firm births and business expansions; and decreases from firm deaths and business declines), each of which may have unique determinants. Thus, in investigating the determinants of employment change, it is important to recognize the businesses life cycle and test whether the key influences vary over that life cycle. <p>This study empirically estimates the determinants of employment growth and assesses their role and relative importance in a communitys job growth. The major determinants include industrial composition, human capital, spatial variables and policy variables. The study is carried out at two levels: sub-provincial and provincial and covers the years 1983-1999. Two econometric methods of estimation are applied, random effects and fixed effects. <p>An important finding is that there are significant differences among the four components of employment change. This implies that when we simply examine overall employment growth we are masking very different effects that the determinants of employment change have among the four components of job growth. At the community level industrial diversification assists the growth of expanding firms and boosts employment due to the establishment of new businesses. On the other side, communities that have high industrial concentration experience lower employment losses from declining and exiting firms. Regions with a higher share of population that has received some post secondary education have, ceteris paribus, higher job growth rates. Another finding is that the farther away a community is situated from a large Census Metropolitan Area, the less employment growth it has. These results offer significant refinements to undifferentiated employment change findings.
9

O impacto da agroindústria canavieira na região de Jaboticabal-SP

Marks, Ricardo Luiz [UNESP] 01 September 2010 (has links) (PDF)
Made available in DSpace on 2014-06-11T19:24:16Z (GMT). No. of bitstreams: 0 Previous issue date: 2010-09-01Bitstream added on 2014-06-13T18:52:02Z : No. of bitstreams: 1 marks_rl_me_arafcl.pdf: 650896 bytes, checksum: b4f16554c21852449fc462aade120d88 (MD5) / Coordenação de Aperfeiçoamento de Pessoal de Nível Superior (CAPES) / A agroindústria canavieira tem sido, ao longo da história do Brasil, uma das atividades mais importantes da economia brasileira. A perspectiva da introdução do álcool carburante como commodity mundial e fonte de energia renovável coloca novamente o setor em evidência. No entanto, pelas suas características técnico-produtivas e extensão, o setor tem sido alvo de muitas críticas. Apesar disso, como as perspectivas para o setor são de crescimento, há impactos econômicos e sociais sobre as cidades onde essa agroindústria está instalada. No passado recente, algumas cidades se desenvolveram baseadas na agroindústria de cana de açúcar, como, por exemplo, Ribeirão Preto, Piracicaba, Araraquara, Sertãozinho e Jaboticabal. Examinar o crescimento dessa agroindústria e o crescimento de renda e a qualidade de vida é o objetivo deste trabalho. O enorme crescimento recente do plantio de cana no Estado de São Paulo, em detrimento de outras atividades agrícolas, justifica este trabalho, que se atém à região de Jaboticabal, uma das principais regiões canavieiras do Estado de São Paulo / The Complex of Sugar Cane Agri-industry has been along of the Brazil history one of the more important activities in the Brazilian Economy. The perspective of introduction of Ethanol as a global commodity, it places this sector on evidence again. However, because of their technical and productive characteristics and extension, the sector has been target of several critics. Nevertheless, as the sector perspectives are for growth, it has social and economic impact over the cities where it was established this agri-industry. At the no longer past some cities developed based over the sugar cane agri-industry as, for example, Ribeirão Preto, Piracicaba, Araraquara, Sertãozinho and Jaboticabal. Analyze the growth of this agriindustry and growth of the income and quality of life is the target of this job. The recent huge growth on the sugar cane plantation in the São Paulo State over another agriculture options justifying this job that is based on one of the more important sugar cane regions of the São Paulo State, the Jaboticabal region
10

Regional Growth and Northeastern Ontario Development: An Analysis of Factor Costs in Manufacturing Activity

Saare, Christian 05 1900 (has links)
Regional growth literature indicates that the relations between the core and the peripheral regions, and the process by which growth is transmitted between regions are of prime importance in discussing growth disparities. Northeastern Ontario is a peripheral region, economic­ally subordinate to the Ontario core region, and exhibits ad­verse growth conditions. Diversification of the region's resource dependent economy has been called for by many groups but has been hindered by the perception of higher manufacturing production costs, However, these costs have not been investigated. In this thesis, Northeastern Ontario centers' factor costs in manufacturing are compared with core centers' costs by utilizing a cost accounting method. The results indicate that some Northeastern locations may be cost attractive locations. However, low costs derived for Toronto would indicate continued manufacturing concentration in the principle centers of the core region. When costs are calculated for hypothetical firms, the importance of the factor requirement structure is indicated in determining location. Northeastern locations would be attractive to firms with large land, and low labour requirements. If future analyses verify these results, alternative explanations of the development problem of the Northeast should be explored. / Thesis / Master of Arts (MA)

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