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  • About
  • The Global ETD Search service is a free service for researchers to find electronic theses and dissertations. This service is provided by the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations.
    Our metadata is collected from universities around the world. If you manage a university/consortium/country archive and want to be added, details can be found on the NDLTD website.
1

Genealogie des Holocaust Art Spiegelmans Maus - a survivor's tale

Frahm, Ole 2001 (has links)
Zugl.: Hamburg, Univ., Diss., 2001
2

Genealogie des Holocaust : Art Spiegelmans Maus - a survivor's tale

Frahm, Ole. 2006 (has links)
Univ., Diss.--Hamburg, 2001. Bibliographie S. [277] - 301.
3

Holocaust representation in Art Spiegelman's Maus

Liu, Dan 2009 (has links)
University of Macau Faculty of Social Sciences and Humanities Department of English
4

Genealogie des Holocaust Art Spiegelmans MAUS - a survivor's tale

Frahm, Ole. 2006 (has links)
Thesis (doctoral)--Universität, Hamburg. Includes bibliographical references (p. [277]-301).
5

From the Lancet to the Page: An Analysis of Bloodletting as a Metaphor For Bearing Witness and Its Potentially Deadly Consequences

Severyn, Ryan J. 2014 (has links)
By investigating the metaphorical connection between bloodletting and the act of writing and drawing, this thesis examines the effects and potential dangers of bearing witness and recording witness testimonials as it is experienced by first-generation and second-generation Holocaust witnesses/authors respectively. Primo Levi’s works as well as biographical records documenting his life and death are examined as the primary sources for the analysis of the survivor or first-generation witness/author. Art Spiegelman’s graphic novels Maus and Maus II provide the source materials for the exploration of the second or ‘postmemory’ generation’s experience with recording their own inherited transgenerational trauma. To support this metaphorical and theoretical framework, I will engage the theories of Janet McCord and her study on suicide and Holocaust survivors as well as employ the works of Sigmund Freud, Dominick LaCapra, Cathy Caruth and Marianne Hirsch in relation to their work on cultural trauma and memory. Graduate
6

Auschwitz has happened: an exploration of the past, present, and future of Jewish redemption

Marcus, Alexander Warren 24 April 2009 (has links)
Ch. 1: Introduction: A Destruction without Adequate Precedent. Ch. 2: Rupture and the Holy Ideal: Redemption in the Hebrew Bible. Ch. 3: Giving the Sense: The Rise of Commentary. Ch. 4: Rabbi Eliezer’s Silence. Ch. 5: Gold and Glass: Ethical Rupture in Mystical Union? Ch. 6: Our Impossible Victory.
7

Maus d’Art Spiegelman. Una dissociació de rols a través de la genealogia semiòtica de gats i ratolins a la literatura, la novel•la gràfica i la cultura visual.

Crisóstomo, Raquel 6 July 2011 (has links)
Art Spiegelman realitzà a Maus una biografia sobre les experiències del seu pare com a víctima de l’Holocaust. El que normalment hagués estat una altra narració de supervivència va constituir un abans i un després per tractar-se d’una novel·la gràfica, un suport molt poc habitual per temes de tanta gravetat. Spiegelman dibuixa a jueus i nazis mitjançant ratolins i gats, respectivament. Aquest plantejament representatiu és assumit de forma natural pel lector, però en realitat es tracta d’una inversió de caràcters entre els dos animals, que només es pot entendre si s’analitzen els precedents gràfics de l’autor. L’animalització dels jueus per part dels nazis, la propaganda bèl·lica feta des del món de l’animació de la mà de Disney i la càrrega visual dels dibuixos animats des del anys trenta convergeixen en l’imaginari de Spiegelman i en la correcta comprensió del seu text. Art Spiegelman made in Maus a biography about his father's experiences as a victim of the Holocaust. What normally would have been another story of survival made a difference for its genre: the graphic novel, which is an unusual support for topics with such burden. Spiegelman draws the Jews and Nazis as mice and cats, respectively. This representational approach is naturally assumed by the reader, but actually it is a reversal of characters between the two animals, which can only be understood if we analyze the author's graphic background. The animalisation of Jews by Nazis, the war propaganda from Disney’s animation, and the visual influence of cartoons from the thirties, converge in Spiegelman’s imaginary and in the correct understanding of his text.
8

The truth of a madman : the works of Art Spiegelman

Smith, Philip 2014 (has links)
Art Spiegelman is one of the most important figures in the history of American comics. His work Maus (1980 and 1991) is arguably the landmark text in the field of comic book studies. Given the relatively recent reissue of his first collection Breakdowns (2008) and the publication of his interview/essay collection/scrapbook Metamaus (2011), it is likely that his work will continue to be the subject of critical interest. This thesis concerns the collections Breakdowns (1977 and 2008), Maus (1980 and 1991) and In the Shadow of No Towers (2004). It represents the first book-length extended study of Spiegelman s three major works. The central argument put forth in this thesis is that the Spiegelman oeuvre articulates and manifests a madness which its author perceives to underlie supposedly rational society. In support of this thesis I will employ critical models from the following fields: Holocaust studies, trauma theory, the anti-psychiatry movement, theories concerning the representation of madness, formalist analyses of comics, and Genette s narratological taxonomy.
9

Auschwitz has Happened: An Exploration of the Past, Present, and Future of Jewish Redemption

Marcus, Alexander Warren 24 April 2009 (has links)
Ch. 1: Introduction: A Destruction without Adequate Precedent. Ch. 2: Rupture and the Holy Ideal: Redemption in the Hebrew Bible. Ch. 3: Giving the Sense: The Rise of Commentary. Ch. 4: Rabbi Eliezer’s Silence. Ch. 5: Gold and Glass: Ethical Rupture in Mystical Union? Ch. 6: Our Impossible Victory.
10

Representations of trauma in autobiographical graphic narratives

Johnson, Tara Jessica 3 May 2014 (has links)
This study has analyzed the relationship between trauma and otherness in two autobiographical graphic narratives. The study suggests that autobiographical graphic narratives are better equipped to represent the effects, mainly that of otherness, on the self as a result of trauma. In the ten volume manga series Barefoot Gen, Keiji Nakazawa details his childhood survival of the atomic bombing of Hiroshima during World War II. As he rebuilds his life, fellow survivals that look like his deceased family members recall his trauma of the bombing. Like we see in Nakazawa’s Barefoot Gen, Art Spiegelman also uses repetitious imagery and a fragmentary form of comic narration to represent the experience of trauma throughout In the Shadow of No Towers. However, while Nakazawa repeats specific imagery of the atomic bombing throughout Barefoot Gen based on his eyewitness testimony, Spiegelman manipulates imagery of the September 11, 2001, terrorist attacks to reject the notion that only one specific set of images can represent a traumatic event. Thus, by the end of the second section of In the Shadow of No Towers, Spiegelman creates a multiplicity of images to reenact the trauma of 9/11. Access to thesis permanently restricted to Ball State community only.

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