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  • About
  • The Global ETD Search service is a free service for researchers to find electronic theses and dissertations. This service is provided by the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations.
    Our metadata is collected from universities around the world. If you manage a university/consortium/country archive and want to be added, details can be found on the NDLTD website.
1

Working with Transgendered People: Coworkers’ Gender Expectations, Conceptions and Behaviours in the Workplace

Falconi, Laurel January 2014 (has links)
Classification schemes are embedded into everyday life and people often expect that each category is fixed and stands alone from one another (Bowker & Star, 2000). In terms of gender, this is evident when people focus on gender as either male or female. With the increasing presence of people who are openly transgendered in the workplace (Taranowski, 2008), people’s expectations about gender as something ‘that just is’ are questioned. There is an emerging research literature focusing on people who transition in their work environments, but comparatively little on their coworkers. This research focuses on the experiences of the coworkers’ to examine how they interpret the meaning of gender after their colleague transitioned from being a “man” to being a “woman”. By analyzing and interpreting people’s behaviours in the context of a workplace where an individual reconstructs what it means to embody a specific gender identity, the feelings and behaviours that arise when expectations about gender are contradicted can be examined.
2

Gender-queer Identity and Resistance to Gender Binary in Andrea Gibson's Poetry

Sultan, Hazar January 2015 (has links)
The question of gender, specifically gender identity, is prominent in today’s society. It is highly debated and through the development of queer theory it is gaining more academic recognition. However, there is a gap regarding representation of the gender-queer identity of one contemporary poet, Andrea Gibson. Gibson provides a much needed perspective and voice in society and scholarly debates. This is why this essay uses queer theory along with Kate Bornstein and Judith Butler to examine three poems by Gibson, “Swing-Set, “The Jewelry Store” and “A Genderful Pep-Talk for my Younger Self”. The essay analyses the ways Gibson, through poetry, formulates a gender-queer identity and thus questions the generic gender binary system.
3

”Du kan inte bestämma mitt kön, så sluta med det nu!” : En kvalitativ internetstudie om personer som identifierar sig utanför det binära könssystemet / “You can’t decide my gender, so stop doing it now!” : A qualitative internet study about people who identify outside the gender binary system

Skogström, Mathilda, Abrahamsson, Emilia January 2017 (has links)
The purpose of this study was to gain knowledge about how people who identify themselves outside the gender binary system look upon treatment from people in different contexts and how the strategies they use in relation to treatment are expressed. As an approach to this study, we chose to do a qualitative internet study, the empirical material included ten various blogs written by people who identify themselves outside the gender binary system. By using a content analysis we were able to distinguish themes concerning good and bad treatment as well as different forms of coping in our empirical material. The analysis was based on two different kinds of perspectives: queer theory and the concept of coping strategies. The result of this study showed that people who identify themselves outside the gender binary system experience poor treatment more often than good treatment from people in different contexts. One important result that this study showed was that most people described that they felt reduced and ridiculed by, for example, government officials and family members because of their gender identity. We also found that the people in this study used different strategies to cope with the poor treatment they received. A strategy that most of the people in the study used to avoid being treated badly were dressing in gender-neutral clothes. The main conclusion of the study is that it is important that we humans do not assume that all persons belong to the gender binary system. More knowledge about the area is needed to enable us to treat people who identify outside the gender binary system adequately.
4

Breaking the binary : exploring gender self-presentation and passing on #TransIsBeautiful on Instagram

Rutten, Theresa January 2018 (has links)
The advent of social media enabled sexual minorities, as LGBTQ+ people, to find a community online. However, it can be difficult for transgender people to express their gender identity without risking a form of social injustice, as transgender people are not included in the prevailing gender binary. This thesis explores how transgender people present gender on the hashtag #TransIsBeautfiul on Instagram and to what extent to what extent can a form of ‘passing’ be seen in how transgender people adhere to expressing societal gender norms. Goffman’s (1979) theory on gender display is adapted as a main framework to analyse 346 posts with a qualitative content analysis. The theories of gender display (1979) and self-presentation (1956) by Goffman and the concept of passing by Serano (2007) are also employed for a deeper understanding of the social construction of gender. Findings show a great diversity of gender self-presentations. Transgender people tend to express their masculinity and femininity in an exaggerated way, by emphasizing certain masculine and feminine aspects according to societal gender norms and therefore ‘pass’ as a ‘natural’ member of the gender binary. In complete contrast, there are also transgender people who challenge the gender binary by expressing themselves as non-binary. They represent themselves within and outside the gender binary by mixing and minimizing feminine and masculine aspects. These results show that for transgender people there are two ways of coping with societal gender norms and put the gender binary model into question.
5

Restructured heteronormativity : An analysis of Australian Immigration guidelines for assessing  LGBT+ asylum seekers

Jondorf, Ursula January 2020 (has links)
This thesis analyses materials – a set of guidelines and a presentation – provided for officials  who assess claims related to sexual orientation and gender identity within the Australian  government’s Department for Immigration and Border Protection. The analysis is conducted  using critical discourse analysis to see if the lexicon shows a white heterosexual bias, and if it  does, how the bias is manifested within the guidelines, especially within the context of the  gender binary. The theoretical framework primarily uses Critical Race theory, but also  combines elements of Said’s Orientalism, and absence and presence theory. The results show  that the guidelines do have a white heterosexual bias, which manifests itself in the form of,  Western superiority, stereotypes about LGBT+ people, as well as an undertheorized portrayal  of the gender binary. The findings contribute to research within the queer asylum field,  especially with regards to research on migration from a non-gender-binary perspective.
6

Låt ingen komma undan : Hanteringen av främmande kroppar i Marvels filmuniversum / Leave none alive : Treating foreign bodies in Marvel's cinematic universe

Larsson, Vix January 2017 (has links)
This​ ​essay​ ​examines​ ​the​ ​appearance​ ​of​ ​non-normative​ ​bodies​ ​in​ ​three​ ​films​ ​from​ ​the Marvel​ ​Cinematic​ ​Universe;​ ​​The​ ​Avengers​​ ​(2012),​ ​​Thor:​ ​The​ ​Dark​ ​World​​ ​(2013) ​and Avengers:​ ​Age​ ​of​ ​Ultron​​ ​(2015),​ ​in​ ​an​ ​attempt​ ​to​ ​find​ ​qualities​ ​that​ ​might​ ​suggest​ ​queer, non-binary​ ​or​ ​gender​ ​disruptive​ ​attributes,​ ​in​ ​addition​ ​to​ ​looking​ ​at​ ​how​ ​the​ ​movies handle​ ​them.​ ​Using​ ​a​ ​combination​ ​of​ ​feminist​ ​film​ ​theory,​ ​queer​ ​theory​ ​and​ ​discourse analysis,​ ​the​ ​Otherness​ ​of​ ​these​ ​bodies​ ​are​ ​put​ ​into​ ​contrast​ ​with​ ​the​ ​normative​ ​and hegemonic​ ​gender​ ​expressions​ ​employed​ ​by​ ​the​ ​protagonists,​ ​the​ ​heroes​ ​of​ ​the​ ​films. While​ ​the​ ​study​ ​finds​ ​several​ ​indications​ ​of​ ​transgressive​ ​bodies​ ​and​ ​'gender​ ​ambiguity' among​ ​the​ ​creatures​ ​and​ ​beings​ ​who​ ​play​ ​the​ ​part​ ​of​ ​inhuman​ ​threat,​ ​as​ ​well​ ​as​ ​the presence​ ​of​ ​discourses​ ​that​ ​paint​ ​them​ ​as​ ​threatening​ ​partly​ ​​because​​ ​of​ ​these​ ​qualities, they​ ​remain​ ​blurred​ ​and​ ​ill-defined,​ ​their​ ​queerness​ ​inferred​ ​rather​ ​than​ ​overt.​ ​The preferred​ ​reading,​ ​the​ ​analysis​ ​suggests,​ ​offers​ ​little​ ​in​ ​the​ ​way​ ​of​ ​identification,​ ​but​ ​all the​ ​more​ ​with​ ​regard​ ​to​ ​oppression.​ ​The​ ​way​ ​these​ ​bodies​ ​are​ ​treated​ ​in​ ​all​ ​three​ ​films implies​ ​that​ ​the​ ​tolerance​ ​for​ ​bodily​ ​deviance​ ​is​ ​virtually​ ​non-existent,​ ​and​ ​that​ ​a defining​ ​quality​ ​of​ ​masculine​ ​leadership​ ​is​ ​the​ ​ability​ ​to​ ​banish​ ​them​ ​from​ ​existence.

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